UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying

The Qualifying rounds for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 determined which 11 teams joined Sweden, the hosts of the 2013 tournament, to play for the UEFA Women's Championship.

Tie breakers

If two or more teams are tied in points the tie breakers are in ascending order:[1]

  1. Points in matches between tied teams
  2. superior goal difference in matches between tied teams
  3. higher number of goals scored in matches between tied teams
  4. higher number of goals scored away from home in matches between tied teams (not to be used in preliminary round ties)

If the number of tied teams is reduced now, tie breakers 1 to 4 are applied again to the still tied teams. Only then the next tie breakers are used

  1. superior goal difference in all matches
  2. higher number of goals scored in all matches
  3. position in the UEFA women’s national team coefficient ranking used for the group stage draw
  4. higher number of goals scored away from home in all matches (not to be used in preliminary round ties)

Preliminary round

Eight teams were divided into two groups of four. The two group winners qualified for the actual qualification round. The draw took place on 3 December 2010.[2] The games were played from 3 to 8 March 2011. The hosts of the two one-venue preliminary round groups are indicated below in italics.

Group 1

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 North Macedonia 3 2 1 0 7 2 +5 7
 Lithuania 3 1 1 1 5 3 +2 4
 Luxembourg 3 1 0 2 4 9 −5 3
 Latvia 3 1 0 2 1 3 −2 3
Lithuania 1–1 North Macedonia
Budrytė Goal 71' Report Andonova Goal 21'
Luxembourg 2–0 Latvia
Settanni Goal 60' (pen.)
Berscheid Goal 70'
Report
Luxembourg 1–5 North Macedonia
Settanni Goal 82' Report Andonova Goal 21'62'
Brahimi Goal 24'
Salihi Goal 59'
Rochi Goal 90+3'
Latvia 1–0 Lithuania
Sokolova Goal 13' Report
Lithuania 4–1 Luxembourg
Imanalijeva Goal 45+2'85'
Vanagaitė Goal 48'
Stasiulytė Goal 59'
Report Thompson Goal 65'
North Macedonia 1–0 Latvia
Rochi Goal 31' Report

Group 2

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Armenia 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1 5
 Malta 3 1 1 1 2 3 −1 4
 Georgia 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
 Faroe Islands 3 1 0 2 2 2 0 3
Georgia 0–1 Malta
Report D'Agostino Goal 90+1'
Faroe Islands 0–1 Armenia
Report Kostanyan Goal 8'
Armenia 0–0 Georgia
Report
Faroe Islands 2–0 Malta
Josephsen Goal 26'
O. Hansen Goal 86'
Report
Georgia 1–0 Faroe Islands
Chichinadze Goal 90+5' Report
Malta 1–1 Armenia
Cuschieri Goal 14' Report Mangasaryan Goal 64'

Qualification round

The two winners of the preliminary round will join the 36 top ranked nations, with the exception of already qualified Sweden, and play in four groups of five teams and three of six teams. The group winners and the best ranked runner-up qualified for the final tournament. The other six runners-up will play three two-legged playoffs with those winners also advancing to the final tournament. This stage will run from September 2011 to September 2012.

Seeding

Pot A Pot B Pot C Pot D Pot E

 Germany (Holder)
 Norway
 England
 France
 Italy
 Denmark
 Finland

 Russia
 Netherlands
 Iceland
 Spain
 Ukraine
 Scotland
 Czech Republic

  Switzerland
 Poland
 Republic of Ireland
 Austria
 Belgium
 Belarus
 Slovenia

 Hungary
 Serbia
 Portugal
 Greece
 Slovakia
 Romania
 Wales

 Bulgaria
 Northern Ireland
 Turkey
 Israel
 Estonia
 Croatia
 Kazakhstan
 Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Armenia
 North Macedonia

Due to the risk of suspension by FIFA of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Football Federation (NFSBiH), Bosnia and Herzegovina have automatically been drawn in sixth position in Group 1 in order to avoid the possibility of a five-team group being reduced to four.[3] The draw was made on March 14, 2011.[4]

Group 1

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Italy 10 9 1 0 35 0 +35 28
 Russia 10 7 1 2 31 6 +25 22
 Poland 10 5 2 3 17 11 +6 17
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 10 3 1 6 12 21 −9 10
 Greece 10 0 5 5 7 20 −13 5
 North Macedonia 10 0 2 8 5 49 −44 2
Source:
Bosnia and Herzegovina Greece Italy North Macedonia Poland Russia
Bosnia and Herzegovina  1–1 0–1 1–0 0–2 0–1
Greece  2–3 0–0 2–2 1–1 0–4
Italy  4–0 2–0 9–0 1–0 2–0
North Macedonia  2–6 1–1 0–9 0–3 0–6
Poland  4–0 2–0 0–5 4–0 0–3
Russia  4–1 4–0 0–2 8–0 1–1
  • The Poland–Russia match ended 0–2 originally but was awarded a 3–0 win for Russia by the UEFA.

Group 2

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Germany 10 9 1 0 64 3 +61 28
 Spain 10 6 2 2 43 14 +29 20
 Romania 10 5 1 4 20 20 0 16
  Switzerland 10 5 0 5 29 24 +5 15
 Kazakhstan 10 2 1 7 4 55 −51 7
 Turkey 10 0 1 9 4 48 −44 1
Source:
Germany Kazakhstan Romania Spain Switzerland Turkey
Germany  17–0 5–0 5–0 4–1 10–0
Kazakhstan  0–7 0–3 0–4 1–0 2–0
Romania  0–3 3–0 0–4 4–2 7–1
Spain  2–2 13–0 0–0 3–2 4–0
Switzerland   0–6 8–1 4–1 4–3 5–0
Turkey  0–5 0–0 1–2 1–10 1–3

Spain's María Paz Vilas set a new competition record when she scored seven goals against Kazakhstan.[5]

Group 3

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Norway 10 8 0 2 35 9 +26 24
 Iceland 10 7 1 2 28 4 +24 22
 Belgium 10 6 2 2 18 8 +10 20
 Northern Ireland 10 3 2 5 12 15 −3 11
 Hungary 10 3 1 6 18 22 −4 10
 Bulgaria 10 0 0 10 1 54 −53 0
Source:
Belgium Bulgaria Hungary Iceland Northern Ireland Norway
Belgium  5–0 2–1 1–0 2–2 0–1
Bulgaria  0–1 0–4 0–10 0–1 0–3
Hungary  1–3 9–0 0–1 2–2 0–5
Iceland  0–0 6–0 3–0 2–0 3–1
Northern Ireland  0–2 4–1 0–1 0–2 3–1
Norway  3–2 11–0 6–0 2–1 2–0

Group 4

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 France 8 8 0 0 32 2 +30 24
 Scotland 8 5 1 2 21 12 +9 16
 Wales 8 3 1 4 12 14 −2 10
 Republic of Ireland 8 3 0 5 8 11 −3 9
 Israel 8 0 0 8 1 35 −34 0
Source:
France Israel Republic of Ireland Scotland Wales
France  5–0 4–0 2–0 4–0
Israel  0–5 0–2 1–6 0–2
Republic of Ireland  1–3 2–0 0–1 0–1
Scotland  0–5 8–0 2–1 2–2
Wales  1–4 5–0 0–2 1–2

Group 5

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Finland 8 6 1 1 22 4 +18 19
 Ukraine 8 5 1 2 18 4 +14 16
 Belarus 8 4 1 3 10 17 −7 13
 Slovakia 8 3 1 4 8 7 +1 10
 Estonia 8 0 0 8 5 31 −26 0
Source:
Belarus Estonia Finland Slovakia Ukraine
Belarus  2–1 2–2 1–0 0–5
Estonia  2–4 0–5 0–2 1–4
Finland  4–0 6–0 2–0 0–1
Slovakia  3–0 3–1 0–1 0–2
Ukraine  0–1 5–0 1–2 0–0

Group 6

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 England 8 6 2 0 22 2 +20 20
 Netherlands 8 6 1 1 20 2 +18 19
 Serbia 8 4 1 3 15 18 −3 13
 Slovenia 8 1 1 6 6 21 −15 4
 Croatia 8 0 1 7 6 26 −20 1
Source:
Croatia England Netherlands Serbia Slovenia
Croatia  0–6 0–3 1–4 3–3
England  3–0 1–0 2–0 4–0
Netherlands  2–0 0–0 6–0 3–1
Serbia  4–2 2–2 0–4 3–0
Slovenia  1–0 0–4 0–2 1–2

Group 7

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Denmark 8 7 0 1 28 3 +25 21
 Austria 8 6 1 1 16 9 +7 19
 Czech Republic 8 4 1 3 16 9 +7 13
 Portugal 8 2 0 6 16 13 +3 6
 Armenia 8 0 0 8 2 44 −42 0
Source:
Armenia Austria Czech Republic Denmark Portugal
Armenia  2–4 0–2 0–5 0–8
Austria  3–0 1–1 3–1 1–0
Czech Republic  5–0 2–3 0–2 1–0
Denmark  11–0 3–0 1–0 2–0
Portugal  6–0 0–1 2–5 0–3

Ranking of second-placed teams

The highest ranked second placed team from the groups qualify automatically for the tournament, while the remainder will enter the play-offs. As some groups contain six teams and some five, matches against the sixth-placed team in each group will not be included in this ranking. As a result, a total of eight matches played by each team will count toward the purpose of the second-placed ranking table. The Netherlands finished as best runners-up.

Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
6  Netherlands 8 6 1 1 20 2 +18 19
7  Austria 8 6 1 1 16 9 +7 19
5  Ukraine 8 5 1 2 18 4 +14 16
1  Russia 8 5 1 2 17 6 +11 16
4  Scotland 8 5 1 2 21 12 +9 16
3  Iceland 8 5 1 2 12 4 +8 16
2  Spain 8 4 2 2 29 13 +16 14

Play-off round

The six teams advancing as runners-up were drawn against each other to qualify three team through a two legged play-off. The three nations with the highest UEFA coefficients were seeded and played their second leg at home. The draw took place on Friday, 21 September 2012, at 12:45 local time at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[6]

The seeded teams were Iceland, Russia and Spain.[7]

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Scotland  3–4  Spain 1–1 2–3 (a.e.t.)
Ukraine  4–6  Iceland 2–3 2–3
Austria  1–3  Russia 0–2 1–1

First leg

Scotland 1–1 Spain
Little Goal 26' (pen.) Report Adriana Goal 30'
Ukraine 2–3 Iceland
Romanenko Goal 39'
Chorna Goal 51'
Report Ómarsdóttir Goal 5'
Magnúsdóttir Goal 25'
Viðarsdóttir Goal 64'
Austria 0–2 Russia
Report Savchenkova Goal 25'
Shlyapina Goal 43'

Second leg

Spain 3–2 (a.e.t.) Scotland
Adriana Goal 74'
Meseguer Goal 113'
Boquete Goal 120+2'
Report Mitchell Goal 62'
Little Goal 98'

Spain won 4–3 on aggregate.

Russia 1–1 Austria
Kostyukova Goal 30' Report Puntigam Goal 75'

Russia won 3–1 on aggregate.

Iceland 3–2 Ukraine
Viðarsdóttir Goal 8'
Ómarsdóttir Goal 12'
Brynjarsdóttir Goal 76'
Report Dyatel Goal 36'
Apanaschenko Goal 72'

Iceland won 6–4 on aggregate.

Top goalscorers

The top scorers in UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying are as follows:[8]

Rank Name Goals Minutes played
1 Germany Célia Šašić 17 532'
2 Switzerland Ramona Bachmann 11 848'
3 Spain María Paz Vilas 10 269'
Spain Verónica Boquete 10 799'
5 Italy Patrizia Panico 9 593'
Norway Isabell Herlovsen 9 630'
Denmark Pernille Harder 9 720'
Iceland Margrét Lára Viðarsdóttir 9 824'
9 Germany Alexandra Popp 8 473'
Netherlands Manon Melis 8 540'
Poland Anna Żelazko 8 627'

References

  1. ^ uefa.com; EURO 2013 Regulations
  2. ^ uefa.com; Preliminary round draw made
  3. ^ UEFA (9 March 2011). "Women's EURO group stage draw to be made".
  4. ^ UEFA (14 March 2011). "UEFA Women's EURO 2013 qualifying draw".
  5. ^ "Germany and Spain in the goals, Finland ahead". UEFA. 5 April 2012. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  6. ^ "Iceland and Ukraine meet in play-offs". UEFA. 21 September 2012. Retrieved 21 September 2012.
  7. ^ "Iceland, Russia, Spain are play-off seeds". UEFA. 20 September 2012. Retrieved 20 September 2012.
  8. ^ "Statistics – Goals scored". UEFA.com. 5 April 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2012.

External links

Croatia women's national football team results

This is a list of the games played by the Croatia women's national football team since Croatia gained independence from Yugoslavia in 1990.

Célia Šašić

Célia Šašić (German pronunciation: [ˈtseːlja ˈʃaːʃɪtʃ]; born 27 June 1988), née Okoyino da Mbabi, is a retired German footballer of Cameroonian and French ancestry. She played as a striker for SC 07 Bad Neuenahr, 1. FFC Frankfurt and the German national team before retiring in 2015.

Eugénie Le Sommer

Eugénie Anne Claudine Le Sommer (born 18 May 1989) is a French football player who plays for French club Olympique Lyonnais of the Division 1 Féminine. Le Sommer plays as a creative attacking midfielder, but often plays as a second striker for the France women's national football team. She was awarded the Bronze Ball for her performance at the 2008 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. Le Sommer made her first major tournament appearance for her nation at UEFA Women's Euro 2009. On 30 June 2010, Le Sommer announced she would be joining the four-time defending champions Olympique Lyonnais departing her former club, Stade Briochin, after three seasons.

Jarmo Matikainen

Jarmo Matikainen (born 21 February 1960) is a Finnish football player and coach, who formerly managed the Wales women's national football team.

Matikainen made over 400 league and cup appearances in a long playing career which included a season at First division (second tier of Finnish competition) with KontU in 1988. He scored nine league goals in 1987 and 12 league goals in 1990 for Helsingin Ponnistus . Matikainen later player–coached Vuosaaren Viikingit from the fourth division to the second division (third level of Finnish league football). Matikainen also managed his first club Helsingin Ponnistus before taking a job with the Football Association of Finland in 1999.Matikainen successfully coached the Finland U–17 and U–19 teams and was assistant coach of the senior team which reached the UEFA Women's Euro 2005 semi-final. In August 2010 it was announced that Matikainen was to take over as Wales' first ever full-time head of national teams on 4 October 2010. As well as overseeing the senior team's UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying campaign, Matikainen assumed direct responsibility for the U–17 and U–19 teams. The holder of a UEFA Pro Licence, Matikainen was also tasked by the Football Association of Wales with helping to develop an overall strategy for women's football in Wales.

Joana Flaviano

Joana Flaviano Aurtenetxe (born 15 February 1990) is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a midfielder. She spent the vast majority of her career with Athletic Bilbao, winning the Spanish league title twice (2006–07 and 2015–16). She also had a season at Torres Calcio of the Italian Serie A.

As an Under-19 international she played the 2007 and 2008 U-19 European Championships. She made a 30-minute substitute appearance for the senior national team in a 0–0 home UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying draw with Romania in September 2012.

Flaviano retired from top level football halfway through the 2017–18 season, aged 27, to pursue other career opportunities.

Malene Olsen

Malene Marquard Olsen (born 2 February 1983) is a retired Danish football defender. She lastly played for Elitedivisionen club Brøndby IF and has also played for the Danish national team.

Olsen began her club career at Hedehusene IK. As of September 2012, Olsen had made the second most appearances for Brøndby with 247. Only Mia Brogaard had more with 327.In 2009 Olsen played for Swedish club Tyresö FF, while working as a nurse in Stockholm.Olsen made her debut for the senior Denmark women's national football team in February 2003; a 4–0 defeat to Norway in La Manga Club. In October 2011 Olsen was recalled to the national team after a five-year absence, for a UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying tie with Austria. She was named in national coach Kenneth Heiner-Møller's squad for the final tournament, where Denmark reached the semi-finals. Olsen retired from football in June 2014.

Marie-Laure Delie

Marie-Laure Delie (born 29 January 1988) is a French football player who currently plays for FC Metz of the Division 1 Féminine. She plays as a striker and is a member of the France women's national football team having made her debut for the team on 23 September 2009.

Martina Müller (footballer)

Martina Müller (born 18 April 1980) is a retired German footballer. She played as a striker for VfL Wolfsburg and the German national team.

Melanie Behringer

Melanie Behringer (born 18 November 1985) is a German footballer who plays as a midfielder for Bayern Munich. She has been Best FIFA Women's Player finalist.

Pamela Begič

Pamela Begič (born 12 October 1994) is a Slovenian footballer. She has played for the Slovenia women's national football team since 2011 including during UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying and UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying.

Pernille Harder (footballer)

Pernille Mosegaard Harder (born 15 November 1992) is a Danish professional footballer who plays as a striker for VfL Wolfsburg as well as for the Danish national team, which she has captained since 2016. She made her debut for the national team in 2009.

Tessa Wullaert

Tessa Wullaert (born 19 March 1993) is a Belgian football forward currently playing for Manchester City in the English FA WSL and the Belgian national team.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 1

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 1 was contested by six teams competing for one spot for the final tournament.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 2

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 2 was contested by six teams competing for one spot for the final tournament.

Spain's María Paz set a new competition record when she scored seven goals against Kazakhstan.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 3

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 3 was contested by six teams competing for one spot for the final tournament.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 4

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 4 was contested by five teams competing for one spot for the final tournament.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 5

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 5 was contested by five teams competing for one spot for the final tournament.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 6

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 6 was contested by five teams competing for one spot for the final tournament.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 7

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying – Group 7 was contested by five teams competing for one spot for the final tournament.

Stages
General information
UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying
Tournaments
Qualification
Finals
Squads

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.