UEFA Women's Euro 2005

The 2005 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2005, was a football tournament for women held from 5 June to 19 June 2005 in Lancashire, England and Cheshire, England. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.[1][2][3]

Germany won the competition for the fourth consecutive tournament, and the sixth time overall (including one win in the predecessor tournament, the European Competition for Representative Women's Teams). Their championship win was the last for coach Tina Theune-Meyer, who months earlier had announced her retirement effective at the end of the tournament. In her nine years in charge of Germany, they won three European titles, two bronze medals in the Olympics, and the 2003 World Cup.[4]

UEFA Women's Euro 2005
Tournament details
Host countryEngland
Dates5 June – 19 June
Teams8
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Germany (6th title)
Runners-up Norway
Tournament statistics
Matches played15
Goals scored50 (3.33 per match)
Attendance118,403 (7,894 per match)
Top scorer(s)Germany Inka Grings (4 goals)
Best player(s)Finland Anne Mäkinen

Teams and structure

Eight national teams participated – seven of which qualified from earlier stages, plus England, which received an automatic berth as the host nation. They were split into two groups of four: Group A and Group B. Each team in a group played each other once, with the top two teams in each group progressing to the semi-finals. The winner faced the runner-up of the other group in a play-off, with the winner of each semi-final advancing to the final to determine the champion.[5]

Group A

Group B

Qualification

A qualifying round ran from 22 March to 3 October 2004.[6] The teams which were entered played in a group stage, with the winners advancing to the final, and the runners-up being given the chance of qualification through a play-off. England, as the host nation, qualified automatically for the tournament.

The following teams were eliminated at this stage:[7]

  • Armenia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Kazakhstan, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Ireland, Romania, Scotland, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine

Three teams were also eliminated in play-offs for the tournament:

  • Czech Republic, Iceland, Russia

More information on the qualification format at UEFA.com

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 2005 UEFA Women's Championship squads

Match officials

Croatia Croatia
  • Blazenka Logarusic
Czech Republic Czech Republic
England England
Hungary Hungary
Northern Ireland Northern Ireland
  • Andi Regan
Poland Poland
  • Katarzyna Nadolska
Romania Romania
  • Floarea Cristina Ionescu
  • Irina Mirt
Slovakia Slovakia
Spain Spain
  • Yolanda Parga Rodriguez
Switzerland Switzerland
United States United States of America

Results

First round

Top two teams in each group advanced to the semi-finals

Group A

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Sweden 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1 5
 Finland 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4
 Denmark 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4
 England 3 1 0 2 4 5 −1 3

Note:

  • Finland and Denmark finished level on points. Finland advanced to the semi-finals due to their head-to-head win.
Sweden 1–1 Denmark
Ljungberg Goal 21' Report Rasmussen Goal 29'
England 3–2 Finland
Valkonen Goal 18' (o.g.)
Barr Goal 40'
Carney Goal 90+1'
(Report) Rantanen Goal 56'
Kalmari Goal 88'
England 1–2 Denmark
Williams Goal 52' (pen.) (Report) M. Pedersen Goal 80'
Sørensen Goal 88'
Sweden 0–0 Finland
(Report)
England 0–1 Sweden
(Report) Sjöström Goal 3'
Finland 2–1 Denmark
Kalmari Goal 6'
Kackur Goal 16'
(Report) Sørensen Goal 45'

Group B

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Germany 3 3 0 0 8 0 +8 9
 Norway 3 1 1 1 6 5 +1 4
 France 3 1 1 1 4 5 −1 4
 Italy 3 0 0 3 4 12 −8 0
Germany 1–0 Norway
Pohlers Goal 61' (Report)
France 3–1 Italy
Lattaf Goal 16'
Pichon Goal 20'30'
(Report) Di Filippo Goal 83'
Germany 4–0 Italy
Prinz Goal 11'
Pohlers Goal 18'
Jones Goal 55'
Mittag Goal 74'
(Report)
Norway 1–1 France
Herlovsen Goal 66' (Report) Mugneret-Béghé Goal 20'
France 0–3 Germany
(Report) Grings Goal 72'
Lingor Goal 77' (pen.)
Minnert Goal 83'
Norway 5–3 Italy
Klaveness Goal 7'57'
Christensen Goal 29'
Gulbrandsen Goal 35'
Mellgren Goal 44'
(Report) Gabbiadini Goal 8' Goal 53'
Camporese Goal 69'

Knockout stage

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
15 June – Preston
 
 
 Germany4
 
19 June – Blackburn
 
 Finland1
 
 Germany3
 
16 June – Warrington
 
 Norway1
 
 Sweden2
 
 
 Norway3
 

Semi-finals

Germany 4–1 Finland
Grings Goal 3'12'
Pohlers Goal 8'
Prinz Goal 62'
(Report) Mustonen Goal 15'
Sweden 2–3 (aet) Norway
Ljungberg Goal 43'89' (Report) Gulbrandsen Goal 41'109'
Herlovsen Goal 65'

Final

Germany 3–1 Norway
Grings Goal 21'
Lingor Goal 24'
Prinz Goal 63'
(Report) Mellgren Goal 41'
Germany
GERMANY:
GK 1 Silke Rottenberg
DF 4 Steffi Jones
FW 6 Inka Grings Substituted off 68'
FW 9 Birgit Prinz (c)
MF 10 Renate Lingor
FW 11 Anja Mittag Substituted off 58'
DF 13 Sandra Minnert
MF 14 Britta Carlson Substituted off 81'
MF 16 Conny Pohlers
DF 17 Ariane Hingst
MF 18 Kerstin Garefrekes
Substitutes:
FW 20 Petra Wimbersky Substituted in 58'
FW 8 Sandra Smisek Substituted in 68'
DF 5 Sarah Günther Substituted in 81'
Manager:
Tina Theune
Norway
NORWAY:
GK 1 Bente Nordby
DF 2 Ane Stangeland (c)
DF 3 Gunhild Følstad
DF 4 Ingvild Stensland
DF 6 Marit Christensen
MF 7 Trine Rønning Substituted off 83'
MF 8 Solveig Gulbrandsen
FW 14 Dagny Mellgren
DF 17 Marianne Paulsen
FW 19 Stine Frantzen Substituted off 59'
FW 20 Lise Klaveness Substituted off 87'
Substitutes:
FW 9 Isabell Herlovsen Substituted in 59'
MF 18 Marie Knutsen Substituted in 83'
FW 16 Kristin Blystad-Bjerke Substituted in 87'
Manager:
Bjarne Berntsen

MATCH OFFICIALS

Goalscorers

4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goal

See also

References

  1. ^ "BBC SPORT | Football | Women | Backlash over Johansson's remarks". BBC News. 2005-06-17. Retrieved 2012-08-20.
  2. ^ Harlow, Phil (2005-06-13). "BBC SPORT | Football | Women | FA hails Euro 2005 as big success". BBC News. Retrieved 2012-08-20.
  3. ^ "Birmingham - Sport - Women's football popularity on the rise". BBC. 2007-05-07. Retrieved 2012-08-26.
  4. ^ "BBC SPORT | Football | Women | Germany Women 3-1 Norway Women". BBC News. 2005-06-19. Retrieved 2012-08-20.
  5. ^ "Women's 2005 European Championships | Mail Online". Dailymail.co.uk. 2005-06-05. Retrieved 2012-08-20.
  6. ^ "UEFA Women's C'ship". Uefa.com. 2009-09-17. Retrieved 2012-08-05.
  7. ^ "UEFA Women's C'ship". Uefa.com. 2009-09-17. Retrieved 2012-08-05.

External links

Camille Abily

Camille Anne Françoise Abily (born 5 December 1984) is a French football player who currently plays for French club Lyon in the Division 1 Féminine. She plays primarily as an attacking midfielder. Abily is a two-time winner of the National Union of Professional Footballers (UNFP) Female Player of the Year and, following her second consecutive honour in 2007, became the first woman to win the award in back-to-back seasons. Following a move to the Women's Professional Soccer (WPS) league in the United States, she earned Player of the Month and All-Star honors.

Abily began her football career joining Jeanne d'Arc Bruz in 1992. In 1994, she joined nearby club FC Bruz. After a year's stint at another local club, Abily spent time in the first division playing for Stade Briochin and La Roche-sur-Yon. In 2002, she was selected to attend the women's section of the nationally recognized Clairefontaine academy. After her stint at Clairefontaine, Abily signed with Montpellier and won two league titles while at the club, as well as the Challenge de France, the women's domestic cup. After three seasons with Montpellier, Abily joined Lyon. Similar to her stint at Montpellier, she won several titles, which included three straight league titles from 2006–2009. In 2008, Abily joined the new United States-based women's soccer league, Women's Professional Soccer, after her American playing rights were chosen by the Los Angeles Sol in the 2008 WPS International Draft. After helping the Sol win the league, Abily returned to France where she played for Paris Saint-Germain on loan. In 2010, she returned to the United States to play with FC Gold Pride and, subsequently, won her second consecutive title in the league. In 2010, Abily announced that she would be returning to Lyon for the 2010–11 season and, subsequently, was a part of the team that won the 2010–11 UEFA Women's Champions League.

Abily is also a French international. Prior to playing for the senior team, she played at youth level representing the under-18 team at the 2001 UEFA Women's Under-18 Championship. Abily made her senior international debut in September 2001, in a friendly match against the Netherlands. She scored her first goal for the national team six years later in a 2–0 win over China in February 2007. Abily made her major international tournament debut for the team at UEFA Women's Euro 2005 and later played on the teams that qualified for UEFA Women's Euro 2009, UEFA Women's Euro 2013 as well as the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2011 and 2015.

Candie Herbert

Candie Monique Nadine Herbert (born 4 June 1977 in Seclin) is a French football player currently playing for FCF Hénin-Beaumont of the Division 1 Féminine. Herbert plays as a striker and is a member of the France women's national football team making her debut in 1994.

Carla Brunozzi

Carla Brunozzi (born 20 April 1976 in Teramo) is an Italian footballer who played as a goalkeeper for the Italy women's national football team. She was part of the team at the UEFA Women's Euro 2001 and UEFA Women's Euro 2005.

Caroline Seger

Sara Caroline Seger (born 19 March 1985) is a Swedish footballer who plays as a midfielder and club captain for FC Rosengård in the Damallsvenskan league. She is the current captain of the Swedish national football team.

Casey Stoney

Casey Jean Stoney (born 13 May 1982) is an English professional football manager and former player who is the head coach of FA WSL club Manchester United W.F.C.. A versatile defender, she was capped more than 100 times for the England women's national football team since making her debut in 2000. After being a non playing squad member at UEFA Women's Euro 2005, she was an integral part of the England teams which reached the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final and the quarter finals of the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2007 and 2011. In 2012 Stoney succeeded Faye White as the England captain and also became captain of the newly formed Team GB squad for the 2012 London Olympics. She ended her playing career at Liverpool Ladies. She was appointed as the first head coach of the newly-formed Manchester United Women on 8 June 2018.

Chiara Marchitelli

Chiara Marchitelli (born 4 May 1985) is an Italian football goalkeeper who plays for C.F. Florentia of Serie A. She has won four league titles with SS Lazio, ASD Fiammamonza and ACF Brescia Femminile (twice).

Giulia Perelli

Giulia Perelli (born 23 April 1982 in Livorno) is an Italian women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the Italy women's national football team. She was part of the team at the UEFA Women's Euro 2001 and UEFA Women's Euro 2005.

Isabell Herlovsen

Isabell Lehn Herlovsen (born 23 June 1988) is a Norwegian football player who is currently playing for Kolbotn after moving home from China and the club Jiangsu Suning. She plays as a midfielder and a striker.

Herlovsen is the daughter of former football player Kai Erik Herlovsen and was born in Germany during his spell at Borussia Mönchengladbach. She is a Norwegian women's international having made her debut at the age of 16. Herlovsen was the youngest player at UEFA Women's Euro 2005 and became the youngest goal-scorer in the tournament's history on 9 June 2005 when she scored a goal in a 1–1 draw against France.

Jarmo Matikainen

Jarmo Matikainen (born 21 February 1960) is a Finnish football player and coach, who formerly managed the Wales women's national football team.

Matikainen made over 400 league and cup appearances in a long playing career which included a season at First division (second tier of Finnish competition) with KontU in 1988. He scored nine league goals in 1987 and 12 league goals in 1990 for Helsingin Ponnistus . Matikainen later player–coached Vuosaaren Viikingit from the fourth division to the second division (third level of Finnish league football). Matikainen also managed his first club Helsingin Ponnistus before taking a job with the Football Association of Finland in 1999.Matikainen successfully coached the Finland U–17 and U–19 teams and was assistant coach of the senior team which reached the UEFA Women's Euro 2005 semi-final. In August 2010 it was announced that Matikainen was to take over as Wales' first ever full-time head of national teams on 4 October 2010. As well as overseeing the senior team's UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying campaign, Matikainen assumed direct responsibility for the U–17 and U–19 teams. The holder of a UEFA Pro Licence, Matikainen was also tasked by the Football Association of Wales with helping to develop an overall strategy for women's football in Wales.

Jessica Julin

Jessica Carola Julin (born 6 December 1978) is a Finnish former footballer who played in either defence or midfield. She spent several seasons in the Swedish Damallsvenskan representing Umeå IK, Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC, AIK and Stattena IF. After making her debut for the Finland women's national football team in 1997, Julin won 118 caps and participated at UEFA Women's Euro 2005 and UEFA Women's Euro 2009.

A Swedish–speaking Finn, Julin was born on Finland's Independence Day. She grew up in Jakobstad. After moving to Sweden and playing for Umeå IK in 1998 and 1999, Julin accepted a scholarship to University of South Carolina and played varsity soccer from 2000 to 2002. She then returned to Umeå but was Cup-tied for the 2003 UEFA Women's Cup Final because she had played for HJK in their 8–0 defeat to Frankfurt in the quarter final. Julin featured in both legs of the following year's final and collected a winners' medal.In 2005, she moved on to Martin Pringle's Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC to ensure first team football ahead of the 2005 European Championships in England. Finland reached the semi final with Julin starting all four matches. Julin wound down her career in Sweden with spells at AIK and Stattena.

She made her debut for the senior Finland women's national football team in March 1997; against Norway in the Algarve Cup. Julin also played in all four matches Finland hosted at UEFA Women's Euro 2009, including the quarter final defeat by England. She retired from international football after the tournament.After the 2010 season Julin retired from playing to become the assistant manager of Jitex BK. She took over as manager of IF Böljan for the 2012 season following two years at Jitex.In 2014 Julin moved to coach Hovås Billdal IF and also made a playing comeback with the Elitettan club. After leading the club to a best ever fifth-place finish in the 2015 season, she resigned her position.

Leanne Hall

Leanne Claire Hall (born 19 May 1980) is an English football goalkeeper and coach who played at full international level for England. She has spent much of her career in Yorkshire, starting at Sheffield Wednesday and enjoying two separate spells with both Doncaster Rovers Belles and Leeds United. Hall also played FA Women's Premier League football for Fulham and Leicester City Women, while the 2000 summer season was spent in Iceland with FH. In a career disrupted by serious injury, Hall attended UEFA Women's Euro 2001 and UEFA Women's Euro 2005 as a reserve goalkeeper. She most recently played for Birmingham City in the 2011 FA WSL.

In 2016 Leanne was announced as Birmingham City Assistant manager.

Hall is a UEFA A licensed coach and runs her own soccer school. She is a coach at Sheffield FC Ladies and the technical director of Leeds United Ladies' Centre of Excellence.

Marianne Paulsen

Marianne Paulsen (born 20 May 1980) is a Norwegian football defender that played for Trondheims-Ørn until she retired from football at the end of 2007. She played at right-back in Norway's team at the UEFA Women's Euro 2005.

Martina Müller (footballer)

Martina Müller (born 18 April 1980) is a retired German footballer. She played as a striker for VfL Wolfsburg and the German national team.

Mia Brogaard

Mia Birkehøj Brogaard (née Olsen, born 15 October 1981) is a Danish former football defender. She played for the Denmark women's national football team and Elitedivisionen club Brøndby.

Republic of Ireland women's national football team 2000s results

This article contains the results of the Republic of Ireland women's national football team between 2000 and 2009. During the 2000s the Republic of Ireland competed in three UEFA Women's Championship qualification campaigns – 2001, 2005 and 2009 – and three FIFA Women's World Cup campaigns – 2003, 2007 and 2011. They also played in the 2003, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Algarve Cups. The Republic of Ireland also went on three tours of the United States – 2004, 2006 and 2008. During the decade the Republic of Ireland also enjoyed some minor successes. In 2000 they won the Celt Cup – a four team tournament that also featured Northern Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. In their 2005 UEFA Women's Euro campaign they also won their second level group, finishing above Romania, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Malta. This effectively saw them promoted to the elite group of nations which competed directly for qualification to major tournaments.

Sofia Lundgren

Sofia Lundgren (born September 20, 1982) is a Swedish football goalkeeper for Damallsvenskan club FC Rosengård and the Swedish national team.

She has formerly played for leading Swedish teams such as Umeå IK and AIK before signing a two-year contract with Linköpings FC in the autumn of 2008.Since making her national team debut in a 6–3 win over England in March 2002, Lundgren competed with Caroline Jönsson, Hedvig Lindahl and latterly Kristin Hammarström for the goalkeeper position.

When Lundgren was injured before the tournament, Maja Åström was drafted into Sweden's squad for UEFA Women's Euro 2005 as the third choice goalkeeper.A back injury kept a frustrated Lundgren out of Sweden's 2013 Algarve Cup squad. The injury eventually kept Lundgren out of all football for one-and-a-half seasons. She signed for Damallsvenskan newcomers Hammarby IF DFF in January 2015. At the beginning of the 2016 season Lundgren signed a short-term contract with Swedish champions FC Rosengård. The contract was extended when Rosengård's first choice goalkeeper Erin McLeod suffered an anterior cruciate ligament injury and Zecira Musovic struggled to overcome a broken arm.

UEFA Women's Euro 2005 qualification

The qualification for the UEFA Women's Euro 2005 was held between March 26, 2003 & November 27, 2004. The first-placed of the group stage qualified directly. The second-placed and the two best third-placed teams played in two playoff matches for three other berths. England qualified as host.

UEFA Women's Euro 2005 squads

This article lists all the confirmed national football squads for the UEFA Women's Euro 2005.

Players marked (c) were named as captain for their national squad.

Élodie Thomis

Élodie Ginette Thomis (French: [e.lɔ.di ʒi.nɛt tɔ.mis]; born 13 August 1986) is a French football player who currently plays for French club Olympique Lyon of the Division 1 Féminine. She plays either a winger or striker and is described as a player who possesses pace comparable to that of French men's internationals Thierry Henry and Sidney Govou. Thomis is a graduate of the women's section of the Clairefontaine academy and is currently a French women's international having made her debut with the team in June 2005 at UEFA Women's Euro 2005 against Italy.

UEFA Women's Euro 2005 finalists
Champions
Runners-up
Eliminated in semi-finals
Eliminated in group stage
Tournaments
Qualification
Finals
Squads

Languages

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