UEFA Women's Championship

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the ‘European Cup’, held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

UEFA Women's Championship
UEFA Women's Euro logo
Founded1984
RegionEurope (UEFA)
Number of teams52 (Qualifiers)
16 (Finals)
Current champions Netherlands (1st title)
Most successful team(s) Germany (8 titles)
Websitewww.uefa.com/womenseuro/
UEFA Women's Euro 2021

History

Women's soccer history has interesting turns and twists starting all the way in Europe. [1] The predecessor tournament to the UEFA Women's Championship began in the early 1980s, under the name UEFA European Competition for Representative Women's Teams. With increasing popularity of women's football, the competition was given European Championship status by UEFA around 1990. Only the 1991 and 1995 editions have been used as European qualifiers for a FIFA Women's World Cup; starting in 1999, the group system used in men's qualifiers was also used for women's national teams.

Eight UEFA Women's Championships have taken place, preceded by 3 editions of the earlier European Competition for Representative Women's Teams. The most recent holding of the competition is the 2017 Women's Euro hosted by the Netherlands in July and August 2017.

Unofficial women's European tournaments for national teams were held in Italy in 1969[2] and 1979[3] (won by Italy and Denmark respectively), but there was no formal international tournament until 1982 when the first UEFA 1984 European Competition for Women's Football qualification was launched. The 1984 Finals was won by Sweden. Norway won in the 1987 Finals. Since then, the UEFA Women's Championship has been dominated by Germany, which has won eight out of ten events, interrupted only by Norway in 1993. Germany's 2013 win was their sixth in a row.

The tournament was initially played as a four team event. The 1997 edition was the first that was played with eight teams. The third expansion happened in 2009 when 12 teams participated. From 2017 onwards 16 teams compete for the championship.[4]

Results

Year Host Final Third place match or losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1984
Details
Final held over two legs
Sweden
1–0
0–1
4–3 (ps)

England
 Denmark and  Italy 4
1987
Details
 Norway
Norway
2–1
Sweden

Italy
2–1
England
4
1989
Details
 West Germany
West Germany
4–1
Norway

Sweden
2–1
(a.e.t.)

Italy
4
1991
Details
 Denmark
Germany
3–1
(a.e.t.)

Norway

Denmark
2–1
(a.e.t.)

Italy
4
1993
Details
 Italy
Norway
1–0
Italy

Denmark
3–1
Germany
4
1995
Details
 Germany
Germany
3–2
Sweden
 England and  Norway 4
1997
Details
 Norway
 Sweden

Germany
2–0
Italy
 Spain and  Sweden 8
2001
Details
 Germany
Germany
1–0
(gg)

Sweden
 Denmark and  Norway 8
2005
Details
 England
Germany
3–1
Norway
 Finland and  Sweden 8
2009
Details
 Finland
Germany
6–2
England
 Netherlands and  Norway 12
2013
Details
 Sweden
Germany
1–0
Norway
 Denmark and  Sweden 12
2017
Details
 Netherlands
Netherlands
4–2
Denmark
 Austria and  England 16
2021
Details
 England 16

Summary

Statistics does not include the unofficial 1969 and 1979 tournaments.

Team Winners Runners-up
 Germany 8 (1989, 1991, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013)
 Norway 2 (1987, 1993) 4 (1989, 1991, 2005, 2013)
 Sweden 1 (1984) 3 (1987, 1995, 2001)
 Netherlands 1 (2017)
 Italy 2 (1993, 1997)
 England 2 (1984, 2009)
 Denmark 1 (2017)

Team summary

Participation details

UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (ceremony before the match)
Ceremony before the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (Germany vs. England) at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Helsinki, Finland
Euro 2009 - Germany-Norway - Goal Scrum 239
Players fighting for the ball during the match between Germany and Norway in UEFA Euro 2009 Women's European Championship in Tampere, Finland.
Euromeister-2009-frauenfussball-ffm-037
Reception of Germany women's national football team, after winning the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, on the balcony of Frankfurt's city hall "Römer"
  • Participation by year of debut
    • 1984: Denmark, England, Italy, Sweden
    • 1987: Norway
    • 1989: Germany
    • 1997: France, Russia, Spain
    • 2005: Finland
    • 2009: Iceland, Netherlands, Ukraine
    • 2017: Austria, Belgium, Portugal, Scotland, Switzerland
Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place (not determined after 1993)
  • 4th – Fourth place (not determined after 1993)
  • SF – Semifinals (since 1995)
  • QF – Quarterfinals (since 2009)
  • GS – Group stage
  • Q — Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  •  — Did not qualify
  •  ×  — Did not enter
  •    — Hosts

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 1984
(4)
1987
Norway
(4)
1989
West Germany
(4)
1991
Denmark
(4)
1993
Italy
(4)
1995
Germany
(4)
1997
Norway
Sweden
(8)
2001
Germany
(8)
2005
England
(8)
2009
Finland
(12)
2013
Sweden
(12)
2017
Netherlands
(16)
2021
England
(16)
Years
 Austria × × × × × × SF 1
 Belgium GS 1
 Denmark SF 3rd 3rd GS SF GS GS SF 2nd 9
 England 2nd 4th SF GS GS 2nd GS SF Q 9
 Finland SF QF GS 3
 France GS GS GS QF QF QF 6
 Germany 1st 1st 4th 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st QF 10
 Iceland × × × GS QF GS 3
 Italy SF 3rd 4th 4th 2nd 2nd GS GS QF QF GS 11
 Netherlands SF GS 1st 3
 Norway 1st 2nd 2nd 1st SF GS SF 2nd SF 2nd GS 11
 Portugal GS 1
 Russia × × × × GS GS GS GS GS 5
 Scotland × GS 1
 Spain × SF QF QF 3
 Sweden 1st 2nd 3rd 2nd SF 2nd SF QF SF QF 10
  Switzerland GS 1
 Ukraine Part of  Soviet Union × GS 1

Results of host nations

Year Host nation Finish
1987  Norway Champions
1989  West Germany Champions
1991  Denmark Third Place
1993  Italy Runners-up
1995  Germany Champions
1997  Norway Group Stage
 Sweden Semi Final
2001  Germany Champions
2005  England Group Stage
2009  Finland Quarter Final
2013  Sweden Semi Final
2017  Netherlands Champions
2021  England To be determined

Results of defending champions

Year Defending champions Finish
1987  Sweden Runners-up
1989  Norway Runners-up
1991  Germany Champions
1993  Germany Fourth Place
1995  Norway Semi Final
1997  Germany Champions
2001  Germany Champions
2005  Germany Champions
2009  Germany Champions
2013  Germany Champions
2017  Germany Quarter Final
2021  Netherlands Undetermined

General Statistics (1984 to 2017)

Pos Team part plyd W D L GF GA Dif Pts
1  Germany 10 43 34 6 3 109 26 +83 108
2  Sweden 10 38 20 5 13 68 46 +22 65
3  Norway 11 36 15 7 14 47 48 -1 52
4  Denmark 9 30 10 7 13 32 41 -9 37
5  England 8 28 11 3 14 40 51 -11 36
6  Italy 11 31 9 5 17 38 54 -13 32
7  France 6 21 8 6 7 29 29 0 30
8  Netherlands 3 14 8 2 4 21 10 +11 26
9  Finland 3 11 3 3 5 11 19 -8 12
10  Spain 3 12 3 2 7 10 14 -4 11
11  Austria 1 5 3 1 1 5 1 +4 10
12  Russia 5 15 1 3 11 10 31 -21 6
13   Switzerland 1 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
14  Iceland 3 10 1 1 8 6 19 -13 4
15  Belgium 1 3 1 0 2 3 3 0 3
16  Portugal 1 3 1 0 2 3 5 -2 3
17  Ukraine 1 3 1 0 2 2 4 -2 3
18  Scotland 1 3 1 0 2 2 8 -6 3

Tournament statistics

Highest attendances

All-time top scorers

Rank Name Euro Total
England
Sweden
1984
Norway
1987
Germany
1989
Denmark
1991
Italy
1993
Germany
1995
Norway
Sweden
1997
Germany
2001
England
2005
Finland
2009
Sweden
2013
Netherlands
2017
1 Germany Inka Grings 4 6 10
Germany Birgit Prinz 2 2 1 3 2 10
3 Italy Carolina Morace 2 1 0 0 1 4 8
Germany Heidi Mohr 1 4 1 2 8
Sweden Lotta Schelin 0 1 5 2 8
5 Sweden Hanna Ljungberg 1 2 3 6
6 Italy Melania Gabbiadini 2 1 2 0 5
Norway Solveig Gulbrandsen 0 3 0 2 5
Germany Maren Meinert 1 1 1 2 5
Italy Patrizia Panico 1 2 0 2 0 5
England Jodie Taylor 5 5
Sweden Lena Videkull 0 1 1 3 5
Germany Bettina Wiegmann 0 0 2 1 2 5

Top scorers by tournament

Year Player Maximum
matches
Goals
1984 Sweden Pia Sundhage 4 3
1987 Norway Trude Stendal 2 3
1989 Norway Sissel Grude
Germany Ursula Lohn
2 2
1991 Germany Heidi Mohr 2 4
1993 Denmark Susan Mackensie 2 2
1995 Sweden Lena Videkull 3 3
1997 Italy Carolina Morace
Norway Marianne Pettersen
France Angélique Roujas
5 4
2001 Germany Claudia Müller
Germany Sandra Smisek
5 3
2005 Germany Inka Grings 5 4
2009 Germany Inka Grings 6 6
2013 Sweden Lotta Schelin 6 5
2017 England Jodie Taylor 6 5

Golden Player by tournament

Year Player
1984 Sweden Pia Sundhage
1987 Norway Heidi Støre
1989 Germany Doris Fitschen
1991 Germany Silvia Neid
1993 Norway Hege Riise
1995 Germany Birgit Prinz
1997 Italy Carolina Morace
2001 Sweden Hanna Ljungberg
2005 Finland Anne Mäkinen
2009 Germany Inka Grings
2013 Germany Nadine Angerer
2017 Netherlands Lieke Martens

See also

References

  1. ^ "History of Soccer - Women in Soccer".
  2. ^ "Coppa Europa per Nazioni (Women) 1969". Rsssf.com. 19 March 2001. Retrieved 2009-09-12.
  3. ^ "Inofficial European Women Championship 1979". Rsssf.com. 15 October 2000. Retrieved 2009-09-12.
  4. ^ "Women's EURO and U17s expanded". UEFA. 8 December 2011. Retrieved 8 December 2011.

External links

1984 European Competition for Women's Football

The 1984 European Competition for Women's Football was won by Sweden on penalties against England. It comprised four qualifying groups, the winner of each going through to the semi-finals which were played over two legs, home and away. As only sixteen teams took part (less than half the membership of UEFA at the time), the competition could not be granted official status. Matches comprised two halves of 35 minutes, played with a size four football.

1987 European Competition for Women's Football

The 1987 European Competition for Women's Football took place in Norway. It was won by the hosts in a final against defending champions Sweden. Once again, the competition began with four qualifying groups, but this time a host nation was selected for the semi-final stage onwards after the four semi-finalists were identified.

1989 European Competition for Women's Football

The 1989 European Competition for Women's Football took place in West Germany. It was won by the hosts in a final against defending champions Norway. Again, the competition began with four qualifying groups, but this time the top two countries qualified for a home-and-away quarter final, before the four winners entered the semi-finals in the host nation.

Gero Bisanz

Gero Bisanz (3 November 1935 - 17 October 2014) was a German football coach.

Iceland women's national football team

The Iceland women's national football team represents Iceland in international women's football. It is currently ranked as the 19th best national team in the world by FIFA as of June 2018. On October 30, 2008, the national team qualified to the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, the first major football tournament Iceland take part in, having previously competed in the 1995 UEFA Women's Championship which was a home and away knockout competition. At the 2013 UEFA Women's Championship they've taken their first point in a major championship, following a draw against Norway in the opening game.During the qualifiers for 2009 UEFA Þóra Tómasdóttir and Hrafnhildur Gunnarsdóttir followed the team and recorded the documentary Stelpurnar okkar (translated: Our Girls) which was premiered on August 14, 2009.

Lena Goeßling

Lena Goeßling (born 8 March 1986) is a German footballer. She plays as a midfielder for VfL Wolfsburg.

Netherlands women's national football team

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France. They have played at the final tournament of the 2009, 2013, and 2017 UEFA Women's Championship and were champions in 2017. They have played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, and reached thirteenth place. They have also played at the final tournament in the 2019 edition, losing 2-0 the final against the United States.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses). Sarina Wiegman has been head coach since January 2017. As of July 2019, the team is ranked number 3 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Silvia Neid

Silvia Neid (born 2 May 1964) is a retired professional German football player and manager. She is one of the most successful players in German women's football, having won seven national championships and six DFB-Pokal trophies. Between 2005 and 2016, Neid served as the head coach of the Germany women's national football team. She was the FIFA World Women's Coach of the Year in 2010, 2013 and 2016.

UEFA Women's Euro 1991

The 1991 UEFA Women's Championship took place in Denmark. It was won by Germany in a final against Norway in a repeat of the previous edition's final. Eighteen teams entered qualifying, which was enough to make the competition the first fully official one, so the name was changed to the UEFA Women's Championship.The tournament served as the European qualifying round for the FIFA Women's World Cup 1991.

UEFA Women's Euro 1991 qualification

The qualification for the UEFA Women's Euro 1991 was held between September 9, 1989 & December 12, 1990. Quarter finals winners qualified for the final tournament.

UEFA Women's Euro 1993

The 1993 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1993 was a football tournament that happened between 1991 and 1993 (with the qualifying round). The final games was held in Italy. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

Norway won the competition against Italy who played at home in the Final.

UEFA Women's Euro 1995

The 1995 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1995 was a football tournament that happened between 1993 and 1995 (with the qualifying round). The final game was held in Germany. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.Germany won the competition for the third time (counting with West Germany's victory in the former European Competition for Representative Women's Teams).

UEFA Women's Euro 1997

The 1997 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1997 was a football tournament held in 1997 in Norway and Sweden. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.Germany won the competition for the second time in a row and 4th overall (counting with West Germany's victory in the former European Competition for Representative Women's Teams).

UEFA Women's Euro 2001

The 2001 UEFA Women's Championship was the eighth UEFA Women's Championship, a competition for the women's national football teams and member associations of UEFA. It took place in Germany between 23 June and 7 July 2001. It was won by Germany with 1–0 in the final against Sweden, after a golden goal.

UEFA Women's Euro 2005

The 2005 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2005, was a football tournament for women held from 5 June to 19 June 2005 in Lancashire, England and Cheshire, England. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.Germany won the competition for the fourth consecutive tournament, and the sixth time overall (including one win in the predecessor tournament, the European Competition for Representative Women's Teams). Their championship win was the last for coach Tina Theune-Meyer, who months earlier had announced her retirement effective at the end of the tournament. In her nine years in charge of Germany, they won three European titles, two bronze medals in the Olympics, and the 2003 World Cup.

UEFA Women's Euro 2009

The 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, or just Women's Euro 2009, was played in Finland between August 23 and September 10, 2009. The host was appointed on July 11, 2006, in a UEFA Executive Committee meeting in Berlin and the Finnish proposal won over the Dutch proposal.

The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 2009 tournament was won by Germany for a seventh time in ten events. They beat England, appearing in their first final since 1984, 6–2 in the final. The Germans also boasted the tournament's leading goalscorer in Inka Grings.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013

The 2013 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as Women's Euro 2013, was the 11th European Championship for women's national football teams organised by UEFA. The final tournament, held in Sweden from 10 to 28 July 2013, became the most-watched in the history of the Women's Euros. It concluded with Germany, the defending champions, winning their sixth consecutive and eighth overall Women's Euro title after defeating Norway in the final.Sweden were selected as hosts by UEFA's Executive Committee in 2010, meaning their team automatically qualified for the final tournament. The other eleven finalists were decided by a qualifying competition, featuring 44 teams, staged between March 2011 to October 2012. It was the last time the finals featured twelve teams, as from 2017 onwards they will be expanded to include sixteen teams.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams (from 12 teams in the previous edition).The Netherlands were declared as hosts by the UEFA Executive Committee on 4 December 2014.Germany's 22-year reign as champions of Europe was ended after losing 1–2 to Denmark in the quarter-finals. In addition it was only Germany's second loss in the finals since 1993. Another former winner, Norway, lost to both finalists, the Netherlands and Denmark, and ended without goals or points.

The Netherlands won their first ever title by beating fellow first time finalists, Denmark, 4–2 in the final.

UEFA Women's Euro 2021

The 2021 UEFA Women's Championship will be the 13th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. It will be the second edition since it was expanded to 16 teams. The championship will be held in England from 11 July–1 August 2021, with the final to take place at the Wembley Stadium. England last hosted the tournament in 2005, the last edition featuring eight teams.The Netherlands are the defending champions.

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