Tyrod Taylor

Tyrod Di'allo Taylor[1] (born August 3, 1989) is an American football quarterback for the Los Angeles Chargers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Virginia Tech, leading the Hokies to the 2011 Orange Bowl during his senior year. He was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the sixth round of the 2011 NFL Draft and served as the backup to starting quarterback Joe Flacco, including during the Ravens' Super Bowl XLVII victory over the San Francisco 49ers.

Taylor was signed by the Buffalo Bills as a free agent in 2015, taking over the starting quarterback duties that season. He went on to earn a Pro Bowl appearance and eventually helped the Bills make their first playoff berth in 17 years before he was traded to the Cleveland Browns in March 2018, with the Bills drafting Josh Allen to replace him. Taylor started the first three games for Cleveland in 2018 before getting injured, and sat behind Baker Mayfield the rest of the season. The following March, he signed with the Chargers.

Tyrod Taylor
refer to caption
Taylor with the Cleveland Browns in 2018
No. 5 – Los Angeles Chargers
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:August 3, 1989 (age 29)
Hampton, Virginia
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:217 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Hampton (Hampton, Virginia)
College:Virginia Tech
NFL Draft:2011 / Round: 6 / Pick: 180
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 17, 2018
TDINT:53–20
Percentage:61.6
Passing yards:9,529
Passer rating:89.6
Rushing yards:1,836
Rushing touchdowns:16
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school career

At Hampton High School, in Hampton, Virginia, Taylor was a three-sport athlete in football, basketball, and track.[2] In football, he helped lead the team as a quarterback, while also becoming the team's kick returner and safety. During his four years as starter, he led the team to a 34–4 record. He accumulated 7,690 yards of offense and scored 100 total touchdowns, breaking every passing record of previous Hampton standout Anthony Mastrocola.[3] He passed for 5,144 yards and 44 touchdowns, while rushing for 2,546 yards and 56 touchdowns.[4]

When Taylor graduated from Hampton in 2007, he was rated as the No. 1 dual-threat quarterback at Rivals.com. ESPN.com rated him the No. 3 overall quarterback, while Scout.com said he's the nation's seventh-best passer.[5] Taylor, who is 6'1" and 200 pounds, ran a 4.55-second 40-yard dash.

Taylor narrowed his final two choices down to Virginia Tech and the University of Florida, and eventually chose to attend Virginia Tech.[6]

College career

Freshman year

During Taylor's freshman year, Taylor shared time for most of the season with the junior quarterback Sean Glennon.[7]

Taylor's first action of college football came in the game against the LSU Tigers on September 8, 2007. In that game, Taylor completed 7-of-18 passes for 62 yards, rushed for 44 yards on nine attempts including his first collegiate touchdown.[8] After that game, Tyrod was named the starter by head coach Frank Beamer. In his first collegiate start against Ohio, Tyrod threw for 287 yards, adding a rushing touchdown.[9]

One of Taylor's early accolades was rushing for 92 yards and a touchdown as well as passing for 204 yards and two touchdowns in leading Virginia Tech to its first victory against Florida State in two decades.[10] The win was the first ever for Frank Beamer against Florida State head coach Bobby Bowden.

On October 13, in the second quarter of a game against Duke, Taylor suffered a high ankle sprain which forced him to miss two games. Taylor returned in a game at Georgia Tech, but did not start for the rest of the season and rotated time with starter Sean Glennon.

Throughout the season, Taylor accumulated 1,356 total yards, including 927 passing and 429 rushing. He completed 72-of-134 passing attempts, for a completion percentage of 53.7. He scored 11 touchdowns during the year, five passing and six rushing.[11]

Sophomore year

Tyrod Taylor
Taylor with the Hokies in 2008

Coming into the 2008 season, Taylor was intended to be redshirted. After Virginia Tech's loss to East Carolina University though, his redshirt was taken off due to Tech's need for more offense. Taylor's first appearance of the season came in the second game of the season against Furman, where he rushed for 112 yards and a touchdown.[12] His first sophomore start came in the following week against Georgia Tech.[13]

After starting every game of the 2008 season leading up to the Florida State game on October 25, Taylor suffered a high ankle sprain on the first play of the Florida State game. Sean Glennon relieved Taylor at the quarterback position after this setback. While Glennon got the start versus Miami, Taylor split time with Glennon and led a crucial fourth quarter to make it a two-point game 16–14. However, he was sacked in a crucial 4th and 3 with less than two minutes to go.[14] After the loss, Taylor started against Duke. After committing five turnovers in the first half, he was pulled from the game and replaced by Sean Glennon.[15] Taylor then started next week at Virginia. He performed well including a 73-yard run. He was 12-for-18 for 137 yards and one touchdown while rushing 16 times for 137 yards.[16] He then started in the ACC Championship Game win over Boston College and was named the ACC Championship Game MVP.[17] On January 1, 2009, he led the Hokies to a 20–7 victory over the Cincinnati Bearcats in the 2009 Orange Bowl.[18][19] Overall, he finished his sophomore season with 1,036 passing yards with two touchdowns and seven interceptions.[20]

Junior year

During his junior season, Taylor led the Hokies to a 9–3 regular season record and a 2nd-place finish in the Coastal Division of the ACC.[21][22] The Hokies played the Tennessee Volunteers in the 2009 Chick-fil-A Bowl and won 37–14, finishing with a final record of 10–3.[23] After climbing as high as #4 in the rankings, Tech lost back to back games against Georgia Tech and North Carolina, but finished the season ranked 10th in both the AP and USA Today Top 25 polls.[24][25] In the 2009 season, he finished with 2,311 passing yards, 13 touchdowns, and five interceptions.[26] After his junior season, he had a 23–5 career record at Virginia Tech, which was the second most wins of all time for a starting quarterback at Virginia Tech.

Senior year

Tyrod Taylor scrambles vs Boise State
Taylor scrambles against Boise State

Taylor's senior season began with two heartbreaking losses to Boise State at FedExField and at home to Division I-FCS James Madison.[27] Taylor was 15-of-22 for 186 yards and two touchdowns, along with 73 yards on the ground, against Boise State, but was unable to respond following a Broncos score with 1:03 remaining.[28] However, Taylor ultimately led the Hokies to a remarkable turnaround season, winning 11 consecutive games after the 0–2 start.[29][30] The 2010 Hokies became the first ACC team to finish with an undefeated 8–0 record in ACC play in 10 years.[31] They became ACC Champions for the fourth time in seven seasons with a 44–33 win over Florida State in the 2010 ACC Championship Game in Charlotte.[32] Overall, in his final collegiate season, he had 2,743 passing yards, 24 touchdowns, and five interceptions.[33] Taylor finished the regular season as ACC Player of the Year and ACC Championship Game Most Valuable Player.

Taylor participated in the 2011 East-West Shrine Game. He completed four of his five passes for 59 yards.[34]

College statistics

Year G GS Passing Rushing
Cmp Att Yds TD Int Pct Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
2007 11 5 72 134 927 5 3 53.7 119.7 102 429 4.2 6
2008 12 10 99 173 1,036 2 7 57.2 103.2 147 738 5.0 7
2009 13 13 136 243 2,311 13 5 56.0 149.4 106 370 3.5 5
2010 14 14 188 315 2,743 24 5 59.7 154.8 146 659 4.5 5
Career[4] 50 42 495 865 7,017 44 20 57.2 137.5 501 2,196 4.4 23

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad Wonderlic
6 ft 0 34 in
(1.85 m)
217 lb
(98 kg)
32 14 in
(0.82 m)
10 in
(0.25 m)
4.51 s 4.09 s 6.78 s 37.5 in
(0.95 m)
10 ft 6 in
(3.20 m)
15
All values from NFL Combine.[35]

Taylor was drafted in the sixth round with the 180th overall pick by the Baltimore Ravens in the 2011 NFL Draft. He was the 11th quarterback to be selected that year.[36] The Ravens previously acquired the pick from the St. Louis Rams in a trade that sent Mark Clayton to St. Louis. The Ravens played him at quarterback in spite of the fact many of the other 31 teams believed he would better be suited at wide receiver instead.

Baltimore Ravens

2011 season: Rookie year

In his first pre-season start against the Atlanta Falcons, Taylor left with a shoulder injury. Early tests revealed no separation and his injury was characterized as a contusion.[37] He orchestrated the game-winning touchdown drive in preseason Week 3. He hit Brandon Jones for a nine-yard touchdown pass with 37 seconds remaining.[38] After making the 53-man final roster, Taylor would win the backup quarterback position and spend his rookie season behind starting quarterback Joe Flacco.

Taylor played in his first regular season game on December 4, 2011 in a victory over the Cleveland Browns. He rushed for a two-yard gain.[39] He appeared on December 18 and threw his first-ever regular season pass, an 18-yard touchdown.[40] He also lined up as a wide receiver for one play against the Indianapolis Colts.[41]

2012 season

On December 30, 2012, Flacco was rested for most of the Week 17 game against the Cincinnati Bengals, offering Taylor significant playing time. Taylor scored his first career touchdown on a one-yard bootleg in the fourth quarter. However, Taylor also threw a crucial interception to defensive end Carlos Dunlap, which Dunlap returned for a touchdown. The Ravens lost the game against the Bengals by a score of 23–17.[42] Taylor, as a backup, went on to earn a championship ring when the Ravens eventually won Super Bowl XLVII over the San Francisco 49ers.[43]

2013 season

Taylor had a decent preseason in 2013 when he completed 21-of-36 passes for 263 yards and four touchdowns with two interceptions. He also showed his versatility as a runner using designed runs and scrambles while rushing for 66 yards on 15 carries.[44] His strong preseason performance allowed him to keep his job as the Ravens backup quarterback for the third straight season.

Taylor did not see any action in the 2013 season until Week 10, in a win against the Cincinnati Bengals. He ran an end-around handoff from Flacco for a gain of 18 yards, which was the longest run by any Ravens player in that game.[45] In Week 12 against the New York Jets, Taylor played 12 total snaps, five at quarterback. He gained seven yards on four carries though he did have a 17-yard first down run in the first quarter. His total yardage was brought down by two second half runs where he lost 13 yards. He also had one reception for six yards.[46] On December 22, 2013, Taylor would enter the game for Flacco during a blowout loss to the New England Patriots. On his very first snap, Gino Gradkowski snapped it too far to the right, and was recovered by New England for a touchdown. He finished the 41–7 loss, completing 1-of-4 passes for two yards and an interception that the Patriots defense returned for a touchdown.[47]

2014 season

Tyrod Taylor 2014
Taylor in 2014

Taylor's only action in the 2014 season was during a Week 6 48–17 blowout victory over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Taylor came in during the fourth quarter to relieve Flacco.[48]

Buffalo Bills

2015 season

Tyrod Taylor against the Texans
Taylor in 2015

On March 12, 2015, Taylor signed a three-year, $3.35 million contract with the Buffalo Bills.[49] On August 31, 2015, Taylor was named starting quarterback of the Bills for the 2015 season by head coach Rex Ryan, beating out former Bills first round pick EJ Manuel and veteran Matt Cassel after a preseason quarterback competition among the three candidates.[50]

In Week 1, Taylor completed 14-of-19 passes for 195 yards and one touchdown while also rushing for 41 yards as the Bills beat the Indianapolis Colts by a score of 27–14.[a][52] The next week against the New England Patriots Taylor threw 30 passes, completing 23 passes and throwing three touchdowns while throwing three interceptions in a 40–32 loss. Taylor also added 43 yards and a touchdown on the ground.[53] Taylor had the best game of his career so far in a 41–14 win over the Miami Dolphins. He completed 21 of his 29 attempts with three touchdowns and no interceptions while adding 12 rushing yards.[54]

During a Week 5 come-from-behind victory over the Tennessee Titans, Taylor became only the fifth quarterback in NFL history to throw for at least 100 yards, run for at least 70 yards and catch a pass in a single game. His jersey from the game was sent to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.[55] The following week it was reported that Taylor had suffered an MCL injury during the game, with the expectation that he would miss the Bills' Week 6 match-up against the undefeated Cincinnati Bengals, and then be re-evaluated the next week.[56]

Taylor returned to action Week 9 and led the Bills to a 33–17 victory over the Miami Dolphins. Taylor finished 11-for-12 with 181 passing yards and a passing touchdown to go along with a career-high 146.5 passer rating.[57] In the win, Taylor also set the franchise record for completion percentage in a single game, completing 91.7% of his passes.

Taylor set the Bills' franchise record for consecutive passes without an interception in the third quarter of a Week 13 win against the Houston Texans. The previous record had been held by Drew Bledsoe since 2002.[58] The streak ended on the last pass of the game in a Week 14 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles (222). The Bills were eliminated from playoff contention the very next week after a 35–25 loss to the Washginton Redskins. In Week 16, Taylor set the Bills franchise record for most rushing yards in a season by a quarterback, and he became the first Bills quarterback with over 500 yards rushing in a season. The Bills finished 8–8 on the year, only the third time they finished .500 or above consecutive years since the late 1990s.[59][60]

Taylor finished the 2015 season completing 63.7 percent of his passes, while throwing for over 3,000 yards, with 20 touchdowns to just six interceptions. He added 568 rushing yards on the ground.[61]

On January 25, 2016, Taylor and teammate center Eric Wood were selected to the Pro Bowl. They replaced Panthers quarterback Cam Newton and Panthers center Ryan Kalil, who were playing in Super Bowl 50. In the Pro Bowl, Taylor completed 8-of-14 passes for 120 yards and a touchdown, but he also threw three interceptions.[62]

2016 season

Tyrod Taylor 2016
Taylor in 2016

Taylor entered training camp as the starting quarterback for the Bills in the final year of his original Bills contract, as the third year of his deal was voided when he played more than 50% of the snaps in the 2015 season.[63] On August 12, 2016, Taylor signed a six-year contract extension worth $92 million with the Bills. The contract contained an option after the first year, however.[64] On Christmas Eve, against the Miami Dolphins, he passed for a career-high 329 yards and three touchdowns in the 34–31 overtime loss.[65] Taylor completed 269-of-436 passes for 3,023 yards and 17 touchdowns with six interceptions in the 2016 season. In addition, he rushed for 580 yards and six touchdowns.[66] He was made inactive for the final game of the season due to him having a clause in his contract that would make his 2017 salary guaranteed if he suffered a serious injury. At the time of the game, he already had a groin injury that could require surgery.[67] On January 5, 2017, Taylor had surgery to repair a core muscle issue.[68] Taylor was selected as a 2017 Pro Bowl alternate, however, he declined the invite due to injury.[69]

2017 season

After the firing of Rex Ryan, it was widely speculated that the Bills would either trade Taylor or decline his option. Nonetheless, the Bills and Taylor agreed to restructure his contract, keeping Taylor signed with the team until the end of the 2018 season.[70] Taylor sustained a concussion early in the third preseason game against the Baltimore Ravens,[71] but was able to recover in time to start in the Week 1 game against the New York Jets.[72]

During the Week 7 game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Taylor helped lead the Bills to a fourth-quarter comeback, driving the offense 75 yards downfield for the game-tying touchdown with less than three minutes remaining. The Buccaneers fumbled on their next possession, setting up the Bills' game-winning field goal by Steven Hauschka. Taylor finished the game with 268 passing yards and a touchdown while also rushing for 53 yards.[73] On November 2, he had a career-high 29 completions on 40 attempts for 285 yards and two passing touchdowns to go along with 35 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in a 31–24 loss to the New York Jets.[74]

On November 15, following a blowout loss to the New Orleans Saints in which Taylor only threw for 56 yards, the Bills announced that Taylor would be benched in favor of rookie Nathan Peterman.[75][76] However, Peterman threw five interceptions during his first start against the Los Angeles Chargers and was replaced by Taylor at halftime.[77] Taylor returned to the Bills' starting lineup in Week 12.[78] During Week 13 against the New England Patriots, Taylor was limited to only 65 passing yards and was carted off the field after aggravating a knee injury initially suffered in the first quarter. He was relieved by Peterman for the remainder of the game as the Bills lost 23–3.[79] Due to the knee injury, Taylor was inactive for Week 14,[80] but returned as the starter in Week 15. The Bills finished the season with a 9–7 record, clinching their first playoff berth since 1999.[81][82]

In the Wild Card Round against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Taylor had 134 passing yards and an interception before leaving the 10–3 loss with a concussion.[83]

Cleveland Browns

Tyrod Taylor (30417967198)
Taylor in 2018 preseason

On March 9, 2018, the Bills agreed to trade Taylor to the Cleveland Browns for a 2018 third-round draft pick.[84] The deal became official five days later, on March 14, at the start of the NFL year.[85]

Despite drafting quarterback Baker Mayfield first overall in the 2018 NFL Draft, the Browns committed to Taylor as their season starter.[86] In his first start against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Taylor helped the Browns snap a 17-game losing streak dating back to 2016, but the game ended in a 21—21 tie. Taylor completed 15 of 40 pass attempts for 197 yards, a touchdown, and an interception while also rushing for 77 yards and a touchdown.[87]

Taylor was injured in Week 3 during a Thursday Night Football game against the New York Jets, which prompted Mayfield to take over at quarterback en route to the Browns finally winning their first game since 2016.[88] Taylor appeared in only one other game on the 2018 season, completing an 11-yard pass against the Kansas City Chiefs in Week 9.[89]

Los Angeles Chargers

On March 13, 2019, Taylor signed a two-year, $11 million contract with the Los Angeles Chargers, reuniting with former offensive coordinator and one-time interim head coach Anthony Lynn.[90][91]

NFL statistics

Regular season

Year Team Games Passing Rushing
GP GS Comp Att Pct Yds TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
2011 BAL 3 0 1 1 100.0 18 0 0 118.7 1 2 2.0 0
2012 BAL 7 0 17 29 58.6 179 0 1 62.3 14 73 5.2 1
2013 BAL 3 0 1 5 20.0 2 0 1 0.0 8 64 8.0 0
2014 BAL 1 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0.0 4 −3 −0.8 0
2015 BUF 14 13 242 380 63.7 3,035 20 6 99.4 104 568 5.5 4
2016 BUF 15 15 269 436 61.7 3,023 17 6 89.7 95 580 6.1 6
2017 BUF 15 14 263 420 62.6 2,799 14 4 89.2 84 427 5.1 4
2018 CLE 4 3 42 85 49.4 473 2 2 63.7 16 125 7.8 1
Total 61 45 835 1,356 61.6 9,529 53 20 89.6 326 1,836 5.6 16
Source:[92]

Postseason

Year Team Games Passing Rushing
GP GS Comp Att Pct Yds TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
2017 BUF 1 1 17 37 45.9 134 0 1 44.2 7 27 3.9 0
Total 1 1 17 37 45.9 134 0 1 44.2 7 27 3.9 0
Source:[92]

Bills franchise records

  • Highest completion percentage in single game (91.7%)[93]
  • Most consecutive pass attempts without an interception (222)[94]
  • Longest run by a quarterback (49)[95]
  • Most rushing yards by a quarterback (1,575)[96]
  • Highest career completion percentage, 500 or more passes thrown (62.6)[97][98]
  • Highest career passer rating, 500 or more passes thrown (92.5)[98][91]

Former Bills records

  • Most rushing yards in a game by a quarterback (79)[99] (Now claimed by Josh Allen)
  • Most rushing yards in a season by a quarterback (580)[100] (Also claimed by Allen)

Personal life

Taylor lists Steve Young, Warren Moon, Michael Vick, and Allen Iverson as his biggest athletic inspirations.[101][102] He is a Christian, having been raised in the faith by his parents.[103][104]

Upon joining the Browns and being featured on Hard Knocks, a minor controversy on how to pronounce Taylor's first name emerged. While the vast majority of people, including TV analysts and Taylor's father and coaches, had been pronouncing it "TIE-rod" for years, Browns guard Joel Bitonio and fourth-string quarterback Brogan Roback were heard on the show pronouncing it "tuh-ROD", which was supported by Taylor's mother and the Browns' senior vice president of operations. When asked about it, Taylor quipped that while he had heard "TIE-rod" most of his life and went with it, his mother gave him the name "tuh-ROD", but that she "doesn't call [him] by [his] first name".[105][106]

Notes

  1. ^ Cassel was credited as the Bills' starting quarterback for Week 1 due to him taking the team's first snap on offense in the wildcat formation with Taylor lined up at wide receiver.[51]

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External links

2007 Virginia Tech Hokies football team

The 2007 Virginia Tech Hokies football team represented Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University during the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team's head coach was Frank Beamer.

The Hokies entered the season returning nine starters on offense and eight on defense, including All-American cornerback Brandon Flowers, from a 2006 team that went 10-3 and finished second in the ACC's Coastal Division behind Georgia Tech.

After the Virginia Tech massacre claimed the lives of 32 students and faculty members on Monday, April 16, 2007, the remainder of spring practice was canceled. The Hokies had been scheduled to hold two more practices in addition to a spring game on Saturday. As a special tribute, ESPN's College GameDay program broadcast from Blacksburg for the Hokies' opening game against East Carolina.

2008 ACC Championship Game

The 2008 ACC Championship Game was a college football game between the Virginia Tech Hokies and the Boston College Eagles. The game, sponsored by Dr Pepper, was the final regular-season contest of the 2008 college football season for the Atlantic Coast Conference. Virginia Tech defeated Boston College, winning the Atlantic Coast Conference football championship, 30–12.

The Virginia Tech Hokies were selected to represent the Coastal Division by virtue of a tie-breaking head-to-head victory against division rival Georgia Tech and came into the game with an 8–4 record (5–3 in ACC play). Representing the Atlantic Division was Boston College, which had a 9–3 record (5–3 ACC). The two teams were the victors of a closely contested season in the ACC. Neither team clinched a spot in the game until the final week before the championship, and both had to rely on conference tie-breaking rules to earn a spot. The game was a rematch of the previous year's contest, which Virginia Tech won, 30–16.

The game was held at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida on December 6, 2008. Tampa had been chosen after poor attendance at the game's previous spot (Jacksonville, Florida) led conference officials to move the game. The 2008 championship was the first to be played in Tampa. The game began slowly, as both teams punted after their opening possessions failed to gain a first down. Later in the quarter, Virginia Tech took a 7–0 lead with a five-yard touchdown run by Tech quarterback Tyrod Taylor. The Hokies never relinquished the lead after that point. Tech extended its lead to 14–0 in the second quarter, but Boston College managed to narrow Tech's lead to 14–7 by halftime. In the second half, Virginia Tech scored 17 points to the Eagles' five, and the Hokies won the game. In recognition of his game-winning performance, Taylor was named the game's most valuable player.

2008 Virginia Tech Hokies football team

The 2008 Virginia Tech Hokies football team represented Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University during the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team's head coach was Frank Beamer. Prior to the season, the Hokies were expected to be in a rebuilding mode, recovering after the graduation of several key players. Despite that fact, Tech was picked to win the Atlantic Coast Conference's Coastal Division in the annual preseason poll of media covering the ACC. The Hokies were ranked the No. 15 team in the country at the start of the season, but suffered an upset loss to East Carolina in their first game. Tech recovered, however, and won five consecutive games following the loss, the ACC Championship, and the Orange Bowl.

2010 ACC Championship Game

The 2010 ACC Championship Game was a college football game between the Virginia Tech Hokies and the Florida State Seminoles. The game, sponsored by Dr. Pepper, was the final regular-season contest of the 2010 college football season for the Atlantic Coast Conference. Virginia Tech defeated Florida State, winning the Atlantic Coast Conference football championship, 44–33. As of 2017, this is the last ACC championship game won by the Coastal Division.

The Virginia Tech Hokies were selected to represent the Coastal Division by virtue of an undefeated (8–0) record in conference play and a 10–2 record overall. Representing the Atlantic Division was Florida State, which had a 9–3 record (6–2 ACC). The game was a rematch of the inaugural ACC Championship Game, won 27–22 by Florida State in 2005.

The game was held at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina on December 4, 2010. Charlotte was chosen after poor attendance at the game's previous locations (Tampa, Florida and Jacksonville, Florida) led conference officials to seek a location closer to the conference's geographic center. The 2010 championship was the first to be played in Charlotte, and the game will return to the city in 2011.

The 2010 game began slowly, as Florida State scored only a field goal on its opening possession and Virginia Tech was held scoreless on its first try. On the second play of Florida State's second possession, Virginia Tech defender Jeron Gouveia-Winslow intercepted a pass by Florida state quarterback E. J. Manuel and returned it for a touchdown, giving the Hokies a 7–3 lead. They did not relinquish the advantage the rest of the game. The teams traded field goals and touchdowns through the remainder of the first and second quarters and entered halftime with Tech leading 21–17. In the third quarter, Tech scored 14 points to Florida State's seven, establishing the winning margin. In the final quarter, each team scored nine points, and the Hokies won with the most points ever scored by one team in an ACC championship game. In recognition of his winning performance, Virginia Tech quarterback Tyrod Taylor was named the game's most valuable player.

By winning, Virginia Tech earned a spot in the 2011 Orange Bowl football game, and Florida State was selected for the 2010 Chick-fil-A Bowl. Several players that participated in the 2010 ACC Championship Game were picked in the 2011 NFL Draft.

2011 Orange Bowl

The 2011 Discover Orange Bowl was a postseason college football bowl game between the Virginia Tech Hokies and the Stanford Cardinal on Monday, January 3, 2011, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. Stanford defeated Virginia Tech 40–12. The game was part of the 2010–2011 Bowl Championship Series of the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season and was the concluding game of the season for both teams. The game, the 77th edition of the Orange Bowl, was televised in the United States on ESPN and the broadcast was seen by an estimated 8.23 million viewers.

Virginia Tech was selected to participate in the Orange Bowl after an 11–2 regular season that culminated with a 44–33 win in the 2010 ACC Championship Game. Stanford was picked as the other half of the matchup following an 11–1 campaign that included the school's best-ever regular-season record. That performance earned the Cardinal a No. 4 ranking in the BCS Poll and the automatic bid to a BCS game that accompanies a top-4 ranking of a second school in a conference other than the champion. In the weeks before that game, media attention focused on both teams' turnarounds from historical difficulties and the performance of Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck. The game also was the first Orange Bowl not sponsored by FedEx in 21 years, ending the longest-running title sponsorship deal among the major bowls.

The game kicked off at 8:39 pm in warm weather, and Stanford scored first, a touchdown, with its third offensive possession. Virginia Tech briefly took the lead with a safety followed by a touchdown of its own, but Stanford restored a 13–12 advantage before halftime. In the second half, Stanford pulled away from Virginia Tech as it scored 13 points in the third quarter and 14 in the fourth while holding the Hokies scoreless.

In recognition of his performance during the game, Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck was named the game's most valuable player. He set a Stanford bowl-game record for touchdowns, and threw three of those scores to tight end Coby Fleener, who set a Stanford and Orange Bowl record with 173 receiving yards. Both teams made coaching changes after the game, as Stanford head coach Jim Harbaugh left the team to coach the National Football League's San Francisco 49ers and Virginia Tech replaced several assistant coaches. Players from each team were selected in the 2011 NFL Draft.

2015 Buffalo Bills season

The 2015 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise’s 56th overall season as a football team, 46th in the National Football League, third under leadership of general manager Doug Whaley and first under new head coach Rex Ryan. It was also the first full season under the ownership of Terry and Kim Pegula (who also own the Buffalo Sabres), having purchased the Bills partway through 2014 after the death of longtime owner Ralph Wilson in March at the age of 95.

The Bills began their season with an open competition for the starting quarterback position after Kyle Orton, the starter for most of the 2014 campaign, retired during the offseason, so the team acquired free agent Tyrod Taylor, a former backup quarterback of the Baltimore Ravens, who won the competition over incumbent second-string quarterback EJ Manuel and trade acquisition Matt Cassel, the latter of whom the team later traded along with a seventh-round pick in 2017 to the Dallas Cowboys, in exchange for a fifth-round draft pick in 2017.

Despite Ryan's bold prediction of the Bills making the playoffs at his introductory press conference, the Bills were unable to do so in their first season with Ryan as head coach, finishing with a record of 8-8 (the team’s first since 2002), making it the 16th straight season without a playoff appearance, which became the longest active in major professional sports after Major League Baseball’s Toronto Blue Jays broke their 22-year playoff drought on September 25, 2015.

2017 Buffalo Bills season

The 2017 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League, and the 58th overall, and third full season under the ownership of Terry and Kim Pegula. The season was the first under the leadership of general manager Brandon Beane and head coach Sean McDermott.

On December 31, the final week of the regular season, the Bills finally ended what would have been their 18-year playoff drought (previously the longest active drought in the NFL and the longest active playoff drought among the four major professional North American sport leagues) with the Bills winning 22–16 over the Dolphins and the Cincinnati Bengals upsetting the Baltimore Ravens 31–27. The Bills also improved on their 7–9 record from 2016 and clinched their first winning season since 2014. However, the Bills lost the wild card game against Jacksonville 3–10, extending their playoff victory drought to 22 years. The Bills are the last team since the NFL re-alignment in 2002 to make the playoffs.

Don Strock

Don Strock (born November 27, 1950) is a former American football player and coach. He played professionally as a quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) with the Miami Dolphins (1973–1987), Cleveland Browns (1988), and Indianapolis Colts (1989). Strock served as the head football coach at Florida International University from 2002 to 2006, compiling a record of 15–41.

Doug Whaley

Douglass G. Whaley (born December 16, 1972) is an American football executive and former collegiate player. He is the current Senior Vice President of Football Operations for the XFL and from 2013 to 2017 was the general manager of the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League.

EJ Manuel

Erik Rodriguez "EJ" Manuel Jr. (born March 19, 1990) is an American football quarterback for the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Florida State and was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

Drafted by the Bills to be their franchise quarterback, Manuel suffered several injuries and saw his on-the-field performance struggle. After starting 10 games in his rookie year and throwing for 1,972 yards and 11 touchdowns, Manuel made just a combined seven starts and threw eight touchdowns over the next three seasons, sitting behind Kyle Orton and Tyrod Taylor on the depth chart. After starting just one game in his fourth season, Manuel was released by the Bills. He then spent one season with the Oakland Raiders and sat out the 2018 season before signing with Kansas City in 2019.

Kelly Holcomb

Bryan Kelly Holcomb (born July 9, 1973) is a former American football quarterback of the National Football League. He was signed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as an undrafted free agent in 1995. He played college football at Middle Tennessee State. Holcomb was also a member of the Indianapolis Colts, Cleveland Browns, Buffalo Bills, Philadelphia Eagles and Minnesota Vikings.

List of Buffalo Bills starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League. The Bills are a professional American football franchise based in the Buffalo–Niagara Falls metropolitan area. The team competes in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The quarterbacks are listed in order of the date of each player's first start for the team at that position.

List of Cleveland Browns starting quarterbacks

The Cleveland Browns are a professional American football team in Cleveland, Ohio. The Browns compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the American Football Conference (AFC) North division.

Since joining the NFL in 1950, the Browns have had 57 different quarterbacks start in at least one game for the team. Pro Football Hall of Fame member Otto Graham, the team's first quarterback, led the Browns to three NFL championships in their first six seasons in the league. Since resuming operations in 1999 after a three-year vacancy, the franchise has been notable for its futility at the quarterback position. From 1999 through week 4 of the 2018 season, the team had 30 different players start at quarterback. Tim Couch, the Browns' first overall draft pick in 1999, is the only quarterback in that stretch to start all 16 games in a season for the team, having done so in 2001. The Browns have started more than one quarterback in 17 consecutive seasons.

List of Virginia Tech Hokies starting quarterbacks

This is a list of American football quarterbacks who have started for the Virginia Tech Hokies football team and the years they participated on the Virginia Tech Hokies football team.

Six Virginia Tech quarterbacks have been taken in the National Football League draft since 1936. Michael Vick was the first overall selection in the 2001 NFL Draft. Besides the NFL, Virginia Tech quarterbacks have also played professionally in the Arena Football League, Canadian Football League, XFL, Indoor Football League, Southern Indoor Football League, and Lone Star Football League.

Three former Virginia Tech quarterbacks went on to be head coaches in Division I-A or professional football. Bruce Arians is the current head coach of the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League.

Nathan Peterman

Nathan Michael Peterman (born May 4, 1994) is an American football quarterback for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Tennessee before transferring to Pittsburgh, and was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in the fifth round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

Despite a prolific college career at Pittsburgh, Peterman has drawn notoriety for his NFL struggles. After throwing five interceptions in the first half of his first professional start, he eventually set the record for most interceptions thrown with less than 100 career passing attempts. He was released by the Bills less than two years after being drafted, throwing 12 interceptions to just three touchdowns.

Racial issues faced by black quarterbacks

This article examines racial issues faced by black quarterbacks. In gridiron football and its variants, American football and Canadian football, the quarterback position is often considered the most important on the team. While there have been a growing number of players of African or minority descent throughout the history of collegiate and professional football, black players have historically faced difficulty in landing and retaining quarterback roles due to a number of factors. In addition, some black quarterbacks claim to have experienced bias towards or against them due to their race, and tend to be portrayed less favorably in the media than their white colleagues. Though opportunities have mostly opened up in the modern era, the ratio of black quarterbacks remains disproportionate to the overall ratio of black players, as 67% of NFL players are black, yet only 17% of quarterbacks are.

Sean Glennon

Sean Glennon (born September 5, 1985) is a former American football quarterback. He played college football at Virginia Tech. He was a member of the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL).

Glennon, was named the starter following the dismissal of Marcus Vick and held that job until being replaced by Tyrod Taylor during the 2007 season. After Taylor was injured against Duke, Glennon reclaimed the starting duties and started every game that season. During the 2008 season, Virginia Tech split time between the two. Glennon's brother Mike currently plays in the NFL.

Terry Luck

Terry Lee Luck (born December 14, 1952) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Cleveland Browns. He played college football for the Nebraska Huskers.

Virginia Tech Hokies football statistical leaders

The Virginia Tech Hokies football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Virginia Tech Hokies football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Hokies represent Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Although Virginia Tech began competing in intercollegiate football in 1892, the school's official record book generally does not include entries from before the 1950s, as the records from this era are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1950s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Hokies have played in 15 bowl games since then, giving players since 2002 an extra game to accumulate statistics. Similarly, the Hokies have played in the ACC Championship Game five times since it began.

All ten of the Hokies' 10 highest seasons in offensive output, both in yardage and scoring, have come during current head coach Frank Beamer's tenure, and eight of them have come in the 21st century.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season. The Virginia Tech football record book generally does not give a full top 10 in single-game statistics.

Los Angeles Chargers current roster
Active roster

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