Typhoon Rammasun

Typhoon Rammasun, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Glenda, was one of the only two Category 5 super typhoons on record in the South China Sea, with the other one being Pamela in 1954. Rammasun had destructive impacts across the Philippines, South China, and Vietnam in July 2014. Rammasun is a Siamese word for thunder god.[1] After Lingling and Kajiki earlier in 2014, Rammasun became the third tropical cyclone, and first typhoon to directly impact the Philippines in 2014. The ninth named storm and the third typhoon of the annual typhoon season, Rammasun formed in the Intertropical Convergence Zone, an area near the equator where the northeast and southeast trade winds come together, and slowly drifted northwest. Having passed through the islands of Micronesia, the system turned west and quickly moved under the influence of a subtropical ridge (STR). Rammasun posed a significant threat to the Philippine island of Luzon, as it was expected to reach typhoon intensity before making landfall there.[2] Though initially forecast to make landfall in Cagayan Valley, the storm followed a more westerly path and was later forecast to make landfall in the Bicol Region and then pass through Bataan and Zambales before brushing past Metro Manila.[3]

In preparation for the storm, Governor of Guam Eddie Calvo declared the island in Condition of Readiness 3[4] and later upgraded it to Condition of Readiness 1. On July 11, NASA satellites revealed Rammasun passing directly over Guam.[5] The American National Weather Service stated that an unexpected rise in wind shear kept the system from intensifying much further before reaching Guam. Rammasun only made landfall on Guam as a tropical depression, with winds much weaker than earlier anticipated.[6] However, under the system, the island received a substantial amount of rainfall, making that day the wettest in around 3 months. The United States territory received 25 to 50 mm (1 to 2 inches) of rain.[7] Along with the Philippines, Taiwan also expected impact from Rammasun. Moderate to heavy rainfall was predicted through most of the country.[8][9] Chinese meteorologists were focusing on second and/or third landfalls in the Chinese Hainan province and northern Vietnam. Residents of Hong Kong were also warned of rainfall and subsequent landslides.[10]

Following the closure of maritime seaports, more than 100 passengers were reportedly stranded at the Port of Batangas, along with 39 rolling cargoes. Meanwhile, at least 841 passengers were stranded in five ports in the Bicol region, namely Matnog, Tabaco, Bulan, Cataingan and Pilar.[11] A total 50 flights were cancelled and over 100 thousand families were evacuated as the typhoon neared landfall.[12][13] The Philippine Department of Health said that they have prepared all government hospitals to aid the rescue and relief process during and after the typhoon. They claimed that they are much better prepared now, than they were for earlier typhoons.[14] Ahead of the landfall, a city in the province of Albay had declared a state of calamity.[15] At around 17:00 Philippine Standard Time (09:00 UTC), Rammasun's eye passed directly over Rapu-Rapu, Albay while the storm was at its initial peak intensity.[16] Various parts of the National Capital Region reported power outages during the storm. They were reportedly caused by "a temporary system balance at 1:29 a.m. due to a sudden plant outage."[17] At least 6,000 people were stranded at various seaports throughout the country due to the storm.[18]

Throughout its devastating journey through southern Luzon, the powerful typhoon barely weakened but instead maintained its strength and even intensified as it made its way across the Bicol Region.

Typhoon Rammasun (Glenda)
Typhoon (JMA scale)
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Rammasun Jul 18 2014 0101Z
Typhoon Rammasun intensifying as it skirted Hainan Island on July 18
FormedJuly 9, 2014
DissipatedJuly 20, 2014
Highest winds10-minute sustained: 165 km/h (105 mph)
1-minute sustained: 260 km/h (160 mph)
Lowest pressure935 hPa (mbar); 27.61 inHg
(Estimated at 888 hPa (26.2 inHg) by CMA)
Fatalities222 total
Damage$8.03 billion (2014 USD)
Areas affected
Part of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season

Meteorological history

Rammasun 2014 track
Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

On July 9, the United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) started to monitor a tropical disturbance, that had developed to the east of the Micronesian State of Chuuk.[19] At this time the system had a broad and ill-defined circulation center which was associated with flaring and disorganized atmospheric convection.[19] Over the next day the system gradually consolidated within an area of favorable conditions, with convection wrapping around the systems obscured low level circulation center.[20] The system was subsequently declared a tropical depression during the next day, by both the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the JTWC with the latter assigning it the designation 09W.[21][22]

09W Jul 11 2014 0345Z
Tropical Depression 09W near Guam on July 11

Early on July 11, the JTWC reported that the system had intensified into a tropical storm, after they had assessed the intensity slightly higher than the Dvorak estimates from various agencies.[23] Later that day as the system approached Guam, the JTWC reported that the system had not intensified into a tropical storm and downgraded it to a tropical depression.[24] This was because of the lack of supporting Dvorak estimates from various agencies and various observations from Guam, that showed the system was a poorly defined low level circulation center with deep convection sheared to the northwest of the center.[24] Early on July 12, the JMA reported that the depression had become a tropical storm and named it Rammasun, as the system passed through the Rota Channel to the north of Guam.[25][26] Later that day as Rammasun moved westwards under the influence of the subtropical ridge of high pressure, the JTWC reported that it had regained tropical storm status after Dvorak estimates from various agencies supported it and the low level structure of the system had improved.[27]

Rammasun entered the Philippine area of responsibility and was given a local name, Glenda on July 13.[28] The storm maintained intensity while a burst of deep central convection developed and the LLCC became slightly more well defined.[29] Over the next couple of hours, vertical wind shear decreased gradually. Rammasun tracked in a westerly direction along the periphery of the steering subtropical ridge. Outflow improved along the southwestern quadrant[30] and Rammasun became a typhoon.[31] The LLCC consolidated while convective banding became well defined and tightly wrapped. During July 14, both the JTWC and the JMA upgraded Rammassun to a typhoon after Dvorak estimates from various agencies suggested a minimum windspeed of 65 knots (120 km/h; 75 mph).[32][33]

Typhoon Rammasun 2014 making landfall
Typhoon Rammasun making landfall in the Philippines on July 15

Shortly before its Philippine landfall, Rammasun developed a 10 nautical miles (19 km; 12 mi) wide eye. The storm had vigorous equatorward and westward outflow. At that time, the storm was peaking at 80 knots (150 km/h; 92 mph) 1-minute sustained winds[34] and 75 knots (139 km/h; 86 mph) 10-minute sustained winds.[35] Though initially expect to maintain that intensity and make landfall before weakening into a tropical storm again due to land interaction, Rammasun further intensified. Some six hours later, the JTWC spotted a 20 nautical miles (37 km; 23 mi) eye, twice as wide as previously reported. The 1-minute sustained winds were set at 100 knots (190 km/h; 120 mph), equivalent to Category 3 of the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale (SSHWS).[36] Rammasun continued to strengthen, despite land interaction. Post landfall, the storm's windspeed continued to rise, as it was located in a very favorable environment. JTWC initially reported winds of 110 knots (200 km/h; 130 mph) 1-minute sustained winds[37] before correcting it to 115 knots (213 km/h; 132 mph) in their best track, making it a Category-4 equivalent typhoon.[38]

By 00:00 UTC on July 16, Rammasun's eye had re-emerged into the South China Sea. The typhoon lost its eye feature due to its interaction with Philippine's rugged terrain. The convective structure had slightly degraded. However, convective banding remained tightly wrapped around the LLCC.[39]

On July 18, Rammasun entered another area of very warm sea-surface temperatures. Consequently, Rammasun rapidly deepened and was upgraded to a Category 4 super typhoon by the JTWC,[40][41] which was upgraded to Category 5 in post-season reanalysis. Later that day, Rammasun made landfall over Hainan at peak intensity,[42] making it one of only two typhoons to make landfall at Category 5-equivalent intensity in China.[43] During landfall, a station on Qizhou Island recorded a sea level pressure of 899.2 millibars, the lowest sea level pressure recorded in China and one of the lowest recorded sea level pressures in the world.[44] The next day, the storm started to weaken. Later that day, both agencies downgraded Rammasun to a tropical storm as it moved to the province of Guangxi and made its third landfall.[45][46] The JTWC made its final warning on the system in the night of the same day. Early on July 20, the JMA reported that Rammasun had weakened into a tropical depression before it was last noted later that day over the Chinese Province of Yunnan.[47][48][49]

Preparations and impact

Costliest known Pacific typhoons
Rank Typhoon Season Damage
(2018 USD)
1 Mireille 1991 $18.4 billion
2 Jebi 2018 $15 billion
3 Songda 2004 $12.3 billion
4 Fitow 2013 $11.2 billion
5 Saomai 2000 $9.17 billion
6 Prapiroon $8.93 billion
7 Bart 1999 $8.65 billion
8 Rammasun 2014 $8.5 billion
9 Herb 1996 $7.99 billion
10 Flo 1990 $7.67 billion
Source: [1]

Mariana Islands

On July 10, as the JTWC initiated advisories on the system, the United States National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office in Tiyan, Guam (NWS Guam) issued a tropical storm watch for Guam, Rota, Tinian, Saipan and surrounding waters out to 75 km (45 mi).[50][50] Later that day the Governor of Guam Eddie Calvo, declared the island nation to be in Tropical Cyclone Condition of Readiness 3 (TCCOR 3), as the strongest winds over the island were expected to peak between 80–95 km/h (50–60 mph).[51] Both of these warnings meant that destructive tropical storm force winds were possible on the islands during the next 48 hours.[50] After the system was declared a tropical storm, tropical storm warnings were issued for Guam and Rota, while TCCOR 2 was declared for Guam.[52][53][54] After TCCOR 2 was declared, all of the non essential agencies of the Guam Government and several business were shut down, including the Judiciary and University.[53][54][55][56] Six elementary schools around the island were used as storm shelters, while woman who had been pregnant for more than 38 weeks and or high risk were asked to report to the Guam Memorial Hospital.[53] A TCCOR 1 was subsequently declared during July 11, as destructive winds were expected to impact the island nation within twelve hours.[56] As a result, all outdoor activity was prohibited until early the next day when the watches and warnings were cancelled after the system was downgraded to a tropical depression.[57][58] Eddie Calvo subsequently reverted the TCCOR for Guam to the seasonal TCCOR, as no damaging or destructive winds were expected to affect Guam as the depression moved through the Rota Channel.[59] NWS Guam subsequently noted that heavy thunderstorms had developed near the center of the system as it moved through the Rota Channel and that the weather over Guam could have been a lot worse.[26]

Philippines

Costliest Philippine typhoons
Rank Storm Season Damage Ref.
PHP USD
1 Haiyan (Yolanda) 2013 ₱95.5 billion $2.2 billion [60]
2 Bopha (Pablo) 2012 ₱43.2 billion $1.06 billion [61]
3 Rammasun (Glenda) 2014 ₱38.6 billion $885 million [62]
4 Mangkhut (Ompong) 2018 ₱33.9 billion $627 million [63]
5 Parma (Pepeng) 2009 ₱27.3 billion $581 million [64]
6 Nesat (Pedring) 2011 ₱15.6 billion $356 million [61]
7 Koppu (Lando) 2015 ₱14.4 billion $313 million [65]
8 Fengshen (Frank) 2008 ₱13.5 billion $304 million [66]
9 Megi (Juan) 2010 ₱12 billion $278 million [61]
10 Ketsana (Ondoy) 2009 ₱11 billion $233 million [64]
Animation of PSWS Glenda
Animation of PAGASA's Storm Signal Raised in each province throughout the passage of Glenda
Aftermath of Glenda in Jose W. Diokno Blvd
Aftermath of Rammasun in Jose Diokno Boulevard

Rammasun (known as "Glenda" in the Philippines) was the first typhoon to impact the Philippines in over eight months, the previous being Typhoon Haiyan. Preparations for Rammasun started in the island nation, early on July 14.[67] In the wake of the storm, The National Transmission Corporation of the country said in their statement, "Preparations included ensuring the reliability of communications equipment, availability of hardware materials and supplies necessary for the repair of damages to facilities, as well as the positioning of line crews in strategic areas, to facilitate immediate restoration work."[68] Storm warning signal number 3 was hoisted over Catanduanes, while signal number 2 was raised over areas such as Camarines Norte, Burias Island, Ticao Island, Marinduque, and southern Quezon.[69] Several islands in southern Luzon and eastern western, and central Visayas were put under storm signal number 1. Over 12 million people, in all, were asked to brace for the typhoon. Classes on all levels were reportedly suspended for the next two days.[70] Philippine National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council's head Alexander Pama, in an interview, said "We are already warning the public to be on alert for possible effects of the weather disturbance: landslides, flash floods, strong rains and winds." more than 1,300 villages were advised about floods or landslides.[71] The Embassy of the United States in Manila cancelled non-immigrant visa applicant interviews scheduled for July 15 and 16. All applicants were asked to reschedule their interviews.[72]

The Philippine Coast Guard asked all shipping vessels to refrain from travelling. Spokesperson Armand Balilo said "Authorities are already on standby to prevent any maritime vessels from sailing as the Philippines braces for Glenda (Ramassun).[73] Department of the Interior and Local Government Director Edgar Tabell said "All DILG offices in Luzon and Eastern Visayas have been activated to prepare for Glenda. Evacuation centers have been prepared and power lines, bridges and roads have also been checked." He also asked all local officials to fully cooperate with them and provide support to the residents.[74] As the typhoon neared the coastline of Philippines, the entire nation was put on red alert.[75] By the early hours of July 15, the government reportedly evacuated eastern coastal areas of the nation. PAGASA said "Storm surges of up to three meters were expected in coastal villages."[76] However, that evening, several other residents fled their homes as the typhoon intensified much more than anticipated.[77] The civil defence chief of Bicol, in an interview said "We are preparing for the worst... it is critical now that we finish the evacuations. About 6,000 residents had already moved to evacuation centres, with authorities aiming to have another 39,000 take shelter before the typhoon hits.[78] Several cities were warned of storm surge ranging from 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) to 3 metres (9.8 ft).[79]

Immediately after the landfall, three fishermen were reported missing. They were reported to have gone out fishing a day ago from the Philippine province of Catanduanes, and failed to return.[80] A wall collapse in Quezon City injured two people.[81]

At least 90% of the total residents of Metro Manila lost power, as poles were toppled and lines downed. The National Grid Corporation of the Philippines posted on Twitter, saying "Around 90% of Meralco’s franchise area is experiencing power outage brought about by downed poles, lines and outages of NGCP’s (National Grid Corporation of the Philippines) transmission lines due to Typhoon Glenda."[82] Strong winds from the storm destroyed several homes in the slums. Most of the capital area was also completely shut down.[83] In total, Rammasun killed 106 people and caused a damage up to Php38.6 billion (US$885 million).[84]

Highest Public Storm Warning Signal

PSWS# LUZON VISAYAS MINDANAO
PSWS #3 Catanduanes, Albay, Sorsogon Northern Samar NONE
PSWS #2 Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Masbate incl. Burias and Ticao Islands, Marinduque, Southern Quezon Northern part of Samar, Northern part of Eastern Samar NONE
PSWS #1 Romblon, Occidental Mindoro, Oriental Mindoro, Lubang Island, Batangas, Cavite, Laguna, Rizal, Bulacan, Pampanga, Bataan, Zambales, Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Pangasinan, Southern Aurora, rest of Quezon incl. Polillo Island, Metro Manila rest of Eastern Samar, rest of Samar, Northern Leyte incl. Biliran Island NONE

Hong Kong

Late on July 16, the Hong Kong Observatory issued the Typhoon Standby Signal No. 1, before issuing the Typhoon Signal Number 3 during the next day as local winds strengthened gradually from the east.[85] Gale-force winds were subsequently recorded offshore and on higher ground, before it made its closest point of approach during July 18, as it passed around 390 km (240 mi) to the southwest of Hong Kong.[85] Winds over the region gradually subsided before the signals were cancelled by the HKO early on July 19.[85] Over the region at least 51 trees were blown down while there were several reports of fallen objects including a lamp post on the Tsuen Wan flyover.[85]

China

Video of fallen trees in Haikou
Typhoon Rammasun 2014 making landfall over China
Typhoon Rammasun shows its landfall over China later on July 18

On July 17, Rammasun made landfall near Wenchang City on the island province of Hainan. The city's mayor, Liu Chun-mei, told the Xinhua News Agency that many houses had been damaged and more than 700,000 people evacuated. Qionghai also suffered heavy damage. Hainan closed all its airports while kindergartens and other schools were shut. Resorts in Hainan were ordered to close and the high speed train in Guangdong bound for Hainan suspended. The typhoon killed one person on the island[86] and injured 21. Waves reached up to 13 m (43 ft) on the northern and eastern coasts of the island and the Leizhou Peninsula.[87] The local government dispatched 66 officials in 13 locales to supervise preparations for the typhoon. Xinhua reported that 6,000 people on Hainan were evacuated. Bus companies also suspended operations due to heavy rains and high winds.[88]

51,000 homes were destroyed in Hainan.[89] 88 people were killed in China while total economic losses were counted to be CNY 44.33 billion (US$7.14 billion).[90]

Vietnam

Vietnamese authorities ordered an evacuation of people from parts of the northern coast of the country on July 18 in preparation for Rammasun.[91] Typhoon Rammasun affected the nearby provinces of Haiphong, Thái Bình, and Nam Định. The officials of Quảng Ninh Province have evacuated more than 1,300 people to safe shelters. Prime Minister Nguyễn Tấn Dũng ordered authorities to help in evacuation and "require all boats to remain close to the shore". He commanded the army to install its forces in the areas for possible search and rescue operations.[92] Heavy rains caused minor flooding in urban areas of Hai Phong and the capital, Hanoi. It also submerged the streets of Nguyen Khuyen, Minh Khai, Truong Dinh and Hang Chuoi. Duong Anh Dien, a government official, told Tuoi Tre that he ordered the cancellation of "all administrative meetings". Residents near the coast areas were evacuated to the nearest designated evacuation sites. All vessels and boats were banned from leaving port. The National Center for Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting said the eye of the storm was about 210 kilometers east of Hoàng Sa with wind speeds reaching 149 kilometers per hour. The mountainous province of Bắc Kạn, Cao Bằng, Lai Chau, Lạng Sơn and Lào Cai were put on high alert for flash floods and landslides. Over twenty flights by Vietnam Airlines were cancelled or delayed at Noi Bai International Airport. The trade department reserved foods and goods to assure support for at least 250,000 people in case of an emergency.[93][94] Overall, around 500 homes were damaged. Throughout Vietnam, Rammasun is responsible for 28 deaths had caused damages of US$6 million.[95]

Retirement

After the system had caused damage to the Philippines, China and Vietnam, the name Rammasun was retired at the Third Joint Session of the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee and WMO/ESCAP Panel on Tropical Cyclones during 2015.[96] The name Glenda was also retired by PAGASA after damages had exceeded 1 billion, while the name Gardo was selected to replace Glenda for the 2018 season.[97][98] In February 2016, Thailand provided replacement names for Rammasun, and a month later, the name Bualoi was chosen to replace it.[99]

See also

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External links

2002 Pacific typhoon season

The 2002 Pacific typhoon season was an active season, with many tropical cyclones affecting Japan and China. Every month had tropical activity, with most storms forming from July through October. Overall, there were 44 tropical depressions declared officially or unofficially, of which 26 became named storms; of those, there were 15 typhoons, which is the equivalent of a minimal hurricane, while 8 of the 15 typhoon intensified into super typhoons unofficially by the JTWC.

The season began early with the first storm, Tapah, developing on January 10, east of the Philippines. Two months later, Typhoon Mitag became the first super typhoon ever to be recorded in March. In June, Typhoon Chataan dropped heavy rainfall in the Federated States of Micronesia, killing 48 people and becoming the deadliest natural disaster in the state of Chuuk. Chataan later left heavy damage in Guam before striking Japan. In August, Typhoon Rusa became the deadliest typhoon in South Korea in 43 years, causing 238 deaths and $4.2 billion in damage. Typhoon Higos in October was the third strongest typhoon to strike Tokyo since World War II. The final typhoon of the season was Typhoon Pongsona, which was one of the costliest storms on record in Guam; it did damage worth $700 million on the island before dissipating on December 11.

The western Pacific basin covers the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2002 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire Northwest Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number when classified by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), which can result in the same storm having two names; in these cases both storm names are given below, with the PAGASA name in parentheses.

2002 in Taiwan

Events from the year 2002 in Taiwan, Republic of China. This year is numbered Minguo 91 according to the official Republic of China calendar.

2014 in China

Events in the year 2014 in China.

Beigang Island

Beigang Island (Chinese: 北港岛), literally North Port Island, is a small island located in the mouth of Dongzhai Harbor, Hainan, China. There are three villages, fish farms, and some mangroves on the island. Beigang Island is under the jurisdiction of Meilan District.

Glenda

Glenda may refer to:

In storms:

Hurricane Glenda, 1963

Tropical Storm Glenda, 1965

Hurricane Glenda, 1969

Tropical Storm Glenda, 1973

Tropical Storm Glenda, 1977

Severe Tropical Cyclone Glenda, 2006

Typhoon Rammasun (2014), known as Glenda in the Philippines, name was retired by PAGASA after dealing extreme damage, replaced by Gardo.Other:

Glenda, the Plan 9 Bunny, mascot of Plan 9 from Bell LabsPeople:

Glenda (given name)

Holiday Beach (Haikou)

Holiday Beach (假日海滩) (officially Holiday Beachside Resort) is beach and visitor attraction located along Binhai Road, Haikou, Hainan, China.The 7-kilometre-long, 33 hectare beach area was officially established in 1995. It is essentially an extension of Xixiu Park, which is directly to the east of Holiday Beach. Since then, it has undergone development with the establishment of visitor attractions such as restaurants, swimming pools, and an amphitheatre.

The land beside the beach has been landscaped and pathways created. The entire shoreline is maintained by workers who remove rubbish.

The beach itself is roughly twenty metres from seawall to waterline, and is visited by tourists and locals alike. The waters are used by swimmers, sailboaters, windsurfers, and occasionally kitesurfers. The beach has also been the site of major competitions for such sports as kitesurfing and volleyball.

List of islands of Hainan

There are many islands directly off the coast of Hainan Island, the southernmost province in China. This article lists them. There are also groups of disputed islands located hundreds of kilometres away that are within Hainan, the administrative area, but not actually part of Hainan, the province. Those islands are not within the scope of this article.

Timeline of the 2008 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all the storm formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, as well as dissipation during the 2008 Pacific typhoon season. The 2008 Pacific typhoon season officially started on January 1, 2008 and ended on January 1, 2009. The first tropical cyclone of the season formed on January 13. The timeline also includes information which was not operationally released, meaning that information from post-storm reviews by the various warning agencies, such as information on a storm that was not operationally warned on, has been included.

During the year, a total of 40 systems were designated as Tropical Depressions by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), who run the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in Tokyo, Japan. The JMA assigns names to Tropical Depressions should they intensify into a tropical storm. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) also assigns local names to tropical depressions which form within their area of responsibility. These names aren’t in common use outside of PAGASA's "Area of Responsibility". The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and other National Meteorological and Hydrological Services also issue warnings for the North-Western Pacific Ocean. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center warnings are referred to numerically to avoid confusion, as the JTWC sometimes recognises a storm at a different intensity compared to the JMA.

For the PAGASA, 21 systems formed or entered in their area during 2008, which 10 of them directly made landfall over the Philippines

Timeline of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season. Most of the tropical cyclones forming between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines.

During the season, 30 systems were designated as Tropical Depressions by either, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), or other National Meteorological and Hydrological Services such as the China Meteorological Administration and the Hong Kong Observatory. As they run the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre for the Western Pacific, the JMA assigns names to Tropical Depressions should they intensify into a tropical storm. PAGASA also assign local names to tropical depressions which form within their area of responsibility; however, these names are not in common use outside of PAGASA's area of responsibility. In this season, 19 systems entered or formed in the Philippine area of responsibility, which eight of them directly made landfall over the Philippines.

The first half of the season was relatively active with seven named storms. During the season, six typhoons underwent rapid deepening. The deadliest and damaging storm so far is Rammasun, killing nearly 200 people with damages of about $7 billion. During August, Hurricane Genevieve entered the basin as a super typhoon. During mid-August, as Genevieve began to weaken, tropical activity in the Northwest Pacific began to decrease, making it the first time no tropical storms develop during the peak of the season since records began. This also occurred for the second time during mid-October, after the dissipation of Vongfong. In early October, Vongfong reached its peak intensity as a strong Category 5 typhoon, the strongest since Typhoon Haiyan in November 2013.

Tropical Storm Gardo (disambiguation)

The name Gloria was used by PAGASA for storms that enter their Philippine Area of Responsibility, but due to political reasons, it was replaced with Glenda for the 2006, 2010, and 2014 seasons. But after Typhoon Rammasun devastated Luzon, it was then replaced with Gardo for future seasons.

Tropical Storm Gardo may refer to:

Typhoon Chataan, a supertyphoon which devastated Guam, and was retired with Matmo for its damages, along with its PAGASA name due to political reasons.

Typhoon Kaemi (2006), a typhoon which struck Taiwan and China.

Typhoon Kompasu (2010), a typhoon which headed for Japan and Korea.

Typhoon Rammasun, a catastrophic supertyphoon which devastated the Philippines and struck Manila as a Category 4

Typhoon Xangsane, a 2006 typhoon that struck China as a Category 5 storm, which led to the retirement of Glenda and Rammasun with Gardo and Bualoi for future seasons

Typhoon Maria (2018), a supertyphoon which passed near Guam and headed to strike China as a weakened typhoon.

Tropical Storm Glenda

The name Glenda has been used for five tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Hurricane Glenda (1963)

Tropical Storm Glenda (1965)

Hurricane Glenda (1969)

Tropical Storm Glenda (1973)

Tropical Storm Glenda (1977)The name Glenda has also been used to name three tropical cyclones in the Philippines by PAGASA in the Western Pacific and was used for the last time in 2014.

Typhoon Kaemi (2006) (T0605, 06W, Glenda) – struck Taiwan and China.

Typhoon Kompasu (2010) (T1007, 08W, Glenda)

Typhoon Rammasun (2014) (T1409, 09W, Glenda) – a category 5 storm that impacted the Philippines in mid-July, leading to the PAGASA name retirement and replacing it with Gardo.The name Glenda has also been used for one tropical cyclone in the southwest Indian Ocean.

Severe Tropical Storm Glenda (2015)The name Glenda has also been used for two tropical cyclones in the southwest Pacific.

Cyclone Glenda (1967)

Cyclone Glenda (2006)

Tropical cyclones in 2014

Tropical cyclones in 2014 were spread out across seven different areas called basins; the strongest of these tropical cyclones was Typhoon Vongfong, which strengthened to a minimum barometric pressure of 900 mbar (hPa; 26.58 inHg) before striking the east coast of Japan. 119 tropical cyclones had formed this year to date. 82 tropical cyclones had been named by either a Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) or a Tropical Cyclone Warning Center (TCWC). The most active basin in 2014 was the Western Pacific, which documented 23 named systems, while the Eastern Pacific, despite only amounting to 22 named systems, was its basin's most active since 1992. Conversely, both the North Atlantic hurricane and North Indian Ocean cyclone seasons experienced the fewest cyclones reaching tropical storm intensity in recorded history, numbering 9 and 3, respectively. Activity across the southern hemisphere's three basins—South-West Indian, Australian, and South Pacific—was spread evenly, with each region recording seven named storms apiece.

The costliest and deadliest tropical cyclone in the year was Typhoon Rammasun, which struck China in July, causing US$8.08 billion in damage. Rammasun killed 222 people; 106 in Philippines, 88 in China and 28 in Vietnam.

Tropical cyclone activity in each basin is under the authority of an RSMC. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) is responsible for tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic and East Pacific. The Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) is responsible for tropical cyclones in the Central Pacific. Both the NHC and CPHC are subdivisions of the National Weather Service. Activity in the West Pacific is monitored by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Systems in the North Indian Ocean are monitored by the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD). The Météo-France located in Réunion (MFR) monitors tropical activity in the South-West Indian Ocean. The Australian region is monitored by five TCWCs that are under the coordination of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Similarly, the South Pacific is monitored by both the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS) and the Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited. Other, unofficial agencies that provide additional guidance in tropical cyclone monitoring include the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC).

Typhoon Angela

Typhoon Angela, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Rosing, was a catastrophic Category 5 typhoon with 180 mph (290 km/h) sustained winds. Typhoon Angela was the third storm in a row that struck the Philippines, following Yvette and Zack. Typhoon Angela was the twenty-ninth tropical cyclone, and the fifth super typhoon of the moderately active 1995 Pacific typhoon season.

Angela caused 9.33 billion Philippine pesos in catastrophic damage across the Philippines, resulting in 882 fatalities. It was the strongest typhoon to hit the Philippines in 25 years.

Typhoon Butchoy

The name Butchoy has been used in the Philippines by PAGASA four times in the Western Pacific.

Tropical Storm Butchoy (2004) (02W) – a tropical storm that was only recognized by PAGASA and JTWC.

Typhoon Rammasun (2008) (T0802, 03W, Butchoy)

Typhoon Guchol (2012) (T1204, 05W, Butchoy) – struck Japan.

Typhoon Nepartak (2016) (T1601, 02W, Butcoy) – struck Taiwan.

Typhoon Florita

The name Florita has been used in the Philippines by PAGASA in the Western Pacific.

Typhoon Rammasun (2002) (T0205, 09W, Florita) – struck South Kore].

Tropical Storm Bilis (2006) (T0604, 05W, Florita) – struck Taiwan and China.

Severe Tropical Storm Lionrock (2010) (T1006, 07W, Florita)

Typhoon Neoguri (2014) (T1408, 08W, Florita)

Tropical Storm Prapiroon (2018) (T1807,09W,Florita)

Typhoon Kalmaegi (2014)

Typhoon Kalmaegi (pronounced [kal.mɛ.ɟi]), known in the Philippines as Typhoon Luis, was the 22nd depression and the 15th named storm of the 2014 typhoon season. Kalmaegi was the first storm to make landfall over the Philippines since Typhoon Rammasun, two months prior. The storm caused flooding in Southeast Asia during mid-September.

Typhoon Rammasun (2002)

Typhoon Rammasun, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Florita, was the first of four typhoons to contribute to heavy rainfall and deadly flooding in the Philippines in July 2002. The fifth tropical cyclone of the 2002 Pacific typhoon season, Rammasun developed around the same time as Typhoon Chataan, only further to the west. The storm tracked northwestward toward Taiwan, and on July 2 it attained its peak intensity with winds of 160 km/h (100 mph). Rammasun turned northward, passing east of Taiwan and China. In Taiwan, the outer rainbands dropped rainfall that alleviated drought conditions. In China, the rainfall occurred after previously wet conditions, resulting in additional flooding, although damage was less than expected; there was about $85 million in crop and fishery damage in one province.

After affecting Taiwan and China, Rammasun began weakening due to an approaching trough, which turned the typhoon northeastward. It passed over the Japanese island of Miyako-jima and also produced strong winds in Okinawa. About 10,000 houses lost power on the island, and high surf killed two sailors. On the Japanese mainland, there was light crop damage and one serious injury. After weakening to a tropical storm, Rammasun passed just west of the South Korean island of Cheju-do, killing one person from high waves. The storm crossed the country, killing three others and leaving $9.5 million in damage. High rains also affected North Korea and Primorsky Krai in the Russian Far East.

Typhoon Rammasun (2008)

Typhoon Rammasun, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Butchoy, was recognized as the second typhoon of the 2008 Pacific typhoon season by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA). Rammasun was also recognised as the third tropical storm, the second typhoon and the first super typhoon of the 2008 Pacific typhoon season by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC).

Rammasun formed on May 5 as a tropical disturbance. The next day the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a tropical cyclone formation alert on the developing disturbance. On May 7 both the JTWC and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the disturbance as a tropical depression, while PAGASA named the depression Butchoy. Later that day both the JMA and the JTWC upgraded the depression to a tropical storm with the JMA naming the storm Rammasun. On May 9 both the JTWC and the JMA upgraded Rammasun to a typhoon. The next day the JMA and the JTWC reported that Rammasun had reached its peak winds of 195 km/h (120 mph) and 250 km/h (155 mph) respectively, which made Rammasun a Category 4 super typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. After reaching its peak intensity, Rammasun weakened and was downgraded to severe tropical storm on May 12, before the JTWC declared it extratropical and issued their final advisory. The JMA did not issue their final advisory until several hours later. Within Japan an estimated 10 hectares (24.7 acres) of farmland were damaged. In all, the typhoon killed four people, injured 40 others and caused $9.6 million (2008 USD) worth of damage in both the Philippines and Japan.

Typhoon Rammasun (disambiguation)

The name Rammasun has been used to name three tropical cyclones in the western north Pacific Ocean. The name was contributed by Thailand, which means the 'god of thunder'.

Typhoon Rammasun (2002) (T0205, 09W, Florita), first of four storms which brought flooding to the Philippines

Typhoon Rammasun (2008) (T0802, 03W, Butchoy)

Typhoon Rammasun (2014) (T1409, 09W, Glenda), a Category 5 super typhoon that impacted the Philippines and China during mid-July, which warranted retirement of the nameThe name Rammasun was later retired during the 2015 annual session the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee. In 2016, WMO chose the name Bualoi to replace Rammasun, and is possibly to be used within the 2019 or 2020 seasons.

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Tropical cyclones of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season

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