Typhoon Lekima

Lekima may refer to four tropical cyclones in the Pacific Ocean. The name was contributed by Vietnam and refers to the lucuma tree.

  • Typhoon Lekima (2001) (T0119, 23W, Labuyo) – in the 2001 season struck Taiwan and China
  • Severe Tropical Storm Lekima (2007) (T0714, 16W, Hanna) in the 2007 season brought heavy rains to Luzon and struck Vietnam
  • Typhoon Lekima (2013) (T1328, 28W) – the second strongest storm of worldwide in 2013
  • Typhoon Lekima (2019) (T1909, 10W, Hanna) – brought heavy rains and flooding to Luzon due to its enhancement of the southwest monsoon, later intensifying into the season's second super typhoon, and made landfall in China.
Preceded by
Francisco
Pacific typhoon season names
Lekima
Succeeded by
Krosa
2001 Pacific typhoon season

The 2001 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2001, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2001 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin are assigned a name by the Tokyo Typhoon Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

2007 Pacific typhoon season

The 2007 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season which featured 24 named storms and 14 typhoons, compared to the average of 27 and 17 respectively. had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2007, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2007 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire West Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their Joint Typhoon Warning Center identifier. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines. This can also result in the same storm having two names.

According to PAGASA, the Philippines had its second quietest season with 14 named storms since the 1998 season, with the 2010 being the most quiet season.

2013 Pacific typhoon season

The 2013 Pacific typhoon season was a catastrophic typhoon season. It was the most active Pacific typhoon season since 2004, as well as the deadliest since 1975. This season also featured one of the most powerful storms in recorded history. It was an above-average season with 31 named storms, 13 typhoons, and five super typhoons. The season's first named storm, Sonamu, developed on January 4 while the season's last named storm, Podul, dissipated on November 15. Most of the first seventeen named storms before mid-September were relatively weak, as only two of them reached typhoon intensity. Total damage amounted to at least $25.75 billion (USD), making it the costliest Pacific typhoon season on record.

Typhoon Soulik in July was the strongest tropical cyclone to affect Taiwan in 2013. In August, Typhoon Utor cost US$2.6 billion damage and killed 97 people, becoming the second deadliest tropical cyclone of the Philippines in 2013. Three systems in August, Pewa, Unala and 03C, continuously crossed the International Date Line from the Central Pacific and entered this basin. Typhoon Haiyan caused catastrophic damage and devastation to the Philippines as a Category 5 super typhoon, killing more than 6,300 people, making it one of the deadliest Pacific typhoons on record.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean to the north of the equator between 100°E and the 180th meridian. Within the northwestern Pacific Ocean, there are two separate agencies that assign names to tropical cyclones, which often results in a storm having two names. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) will name a tropical cyclone should it be judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of at least 65 km/h (40 mph) anywhere in the basin, whilst the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as tropical depressions in their area of responsibility, located between 115°E and 135°E and between 5°N and 25°N, regardless of whether or not the tropical cyclone has already been given a name by the JMA. Tropical depressions monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) are given a number with a "W" suffix.

2019

2019 (MMXIX)

is the current year, and is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

2019 has been assigned as International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements by the United Nations General Assembly given that it coincides with the 150th anniversary of its creation by Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869.

2019 Pacific typhoon season

The 2019 Pacific typhoon season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2019, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Pabuk, reached tropical storm status on January 1, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record that was held by Typhoon Alice in 1979. The season's first typhoon, Wutip, reached typhoon status on February 20. Wutip further intensified into a super typhoon on February 23, becoming the strongest February typhoon on record, and the strongest tropical cyclone recorded in February in the Northern Hemisphere.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean to the north of the equator between 100°E and 180th meridian. Within the northwestern Pacific Ocean, there are two separate agencies that assign names to tropical cyclones which can often result in a cyclone having two names. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) will name a tropical cyclone should it be judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of at least 65 km/h (40 mph) anywhere in the basin, while the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E–115°E and between 5°N–25°N regardless of whether or not a tropical cyclone has already been given a name by the JMA. Tropical depressions that are monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) are given a number with a "W" suffix.

2019 in China

The following lists events that happened during 2019 in China.

August 10

August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 143 days remain until the end of the year.

The term 'the 10th of August' is widely used by historians as a shorthand for the Storming of the Tuileries Palace on the 10th of August, 1792, the effective end of the French monarchy until it was restored in 1814.

Timeline of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season. Most of the tropical cyclones formed between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines.

During the season, 51 systems were designated as Tropical Depressions by either, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), or other National Meteorological and Hydrological Services such as the China Meteorological Administration and the Hong Kong Observatory. As they run the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre for the Western Pacific, the JMA assigns names to Tropical Depressions should they intensify into a tropical storm. PAGASA also assign local names to tropical depressions which form within their area of responsibility; however, these names are not in common use outside of PAGASA's area of responsibility. In this season, 25 systems entered or formed in the Philippine area of responsibility, which 11 of them directly made landfall over the Philippines.

During the season, October was the most busiest and active month with 9 systems formed or active, 8 were all typhoons and 1 weak storm. 3 storms: Pewa, Unala and 03C entered the Western Pacific basin during August, while during early October and early November, 2 tropical depressions crossed the 100th meridian and one became Cyclone Phailin and this is the first time since Cyclone Jal in 2010. Similar to the month October, in the month of August, 13 storms formed by the JMA. Typhoon Haiyan underwent rapid deepening for nearly 100 millibars, becoming the strongest storm of 2013. In this season, 7 storms underwent rapid deepening. This season has the most tropical depressions formed, tied with 1964.

Tropical Storm Morakot (2003)

Tropical Storm Morakot, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Juaning, brought significant rainfall to Taiwan before alleviating drought conditions in mainland China in August 2003. The tenth named storm in the western Pacific that year, Morakot spawned from an area of disturbed weather in the Philippine Sea on July 31. Tracking northwest, favorable conditions allowed for the intensification of the system to tropical storm strength on August 2. Morakot reached peak intensity later that day with winds of 85 km/h (50 mph) and a minimum barometric pressure of 992 mbar (hPa; 28.29 inHg). This intensity was held for several hours until less conducive atmospheric conditions slightly weakened the system; this was followed by Morakot making landfall on southern Taiwan on August 3. Subsequently, the storm weakened and moved into the Taiwan Strait before making its final landfall near Quanzhou, China the next day. The storm quickly weakened over the Chinese mainland, and dissipated entirely several hours after landfall.

In Taiwan, where Morakot first made landfall, heavy rainfall resulted in flooding. Commercial flights, schools, and rail service in some areas was cancelled in advance of the storm. Precipitation there peaked at 653 mm (25.71 in) over a period of nearly two days in Taitung County. Crop damage also resulted from the rainfall, and was estimated at over NT$70 million (US$2 million). In China, record rainfall was reported. The worst impacted city was Quanzhou, where losses due to Morakot reached CN¥240 million (US$29 million) and one death was reported. Power outages were also widespread across southeastern China. Due to preexisting drought conditions, 703 cloud seeding operations took place in order to artificially generate added rainfall; such operations resulted in moderate precipitation over the targeted area. Overall, Morakot caused roughly $31 million in damage and three deaths.

Typhoon Choi-wan (2009)

Typhoon Choi-wan was a powerful typhoon that became the first Category 5 equivalent-super typhoon to form during the 2009 Pacific typhoon season. Forming on September 11, 2009, about 1100 km (700 mi) to the east of Guam, the initial disturbance rapidly organized into a tropical depression. By September 12, the depression intensified into a tropical storm, at which time it was given the name Choi-wan. The following day, rapid intensification took place through September 14. Choi-wan attained its peak intensity on September 15, as it moved through the Northern Mariana Islands with the Japan Meteorological Agency reporting peak windspeeds of 195 km/h (120 mph 10-minute sustained). Additionally, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center reported the storm to have attained winds of 260 km/h (160 mph 1-minute sustained). The typhoon remained very powerful until September 17 when the storm's outflow weakened. The typhoon underwent an eyewall replacement cycle, leading to intensity fluctuations. By September 19, Choi-wan rapidly weakened as strong wind shear caused convection to diminish. The following day, the system transitioned into an extratropical cyclone and dissipated several hours later over open waters.

Despite the intensity of Choi-wan when it passed through the Northern Mariana Islands, no casualties were reported. However, following the storm, the United States Navy deemed that the island of Alamagan was uninhabitable, with all but one of the structures completely destroyed and most of the islands' trees downed. In response to this, all residents on the island were evacuated to nearby Saipan.

Typhoon Francisco (2013)

Typhoon Francisco, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Urduja, was a powerful typhoon that strengthened to the equivalent of a Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The 25th named storm and the 10th typhoon of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season, Francisco formed on October 16 east of Guam from a pre-existing area of convection. With favorable conditions, it quickly intensified into a tropical storm before passing south of Guam. After stalling to the southwest of the island, Francisco turned to the northwest into an environment of warm waters and low wind shear, becoming a typhoon. The JTWC upgraded it to super typhoon status on October 18, while the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) estimated peak 10‑minute sustained winds of 195 km/h (120 mph). Gradual weakening ensued, and after the typhoon turned to the northeast, Francisco deteriorated into a tropical storm on October 24. Passing southeast of Okinawa and mainland Japan, the storm accelerated and became extratropical on October 26, dissipating later that day.

On Guam and in the Northern Marianas Islands, Francisco produced tropical storm force wind gusts, strong enough to knock over some trees and cause $150,000 (2013 USD) in damage. The typhoon also dropped heavy rainfall on Guam, peaking at 201 mm (7.90 in) at Inarajan. Later, Francisco brought gusty winds and some rainfall to Okinawa. In Kagoshima Prefecture, 3,800 homes lost power, while an island-wide evacuation advisory was issued for Izu Ōshima after Typhoon Wipha spawned a deadly mudslide a week prior. Rains in Japan peaked at 600 mm (24 in) in Niyodogawa, Kōchi on Shikoku.

Typhoon Keith

Typhoon Keith was the tenth of a record eleven super typhoons to develop during the unusually intense 1997 Pacific typhoon season. Originating from a near-equatorial trough on October 26, the precursor depression to Keith slowly organized into a tropical storm. After two days of gradual strengthening, the storm underwent a period of rapid intensification on October 30 as winds increased to 195 km/h (120 mph). On November 1, the storm further intensified into a super typhoon and later attained peak winds of 285 km/h (180 mph). The following day, the powerful storm passed between Rota and Tinian in the Northern Mariana Islands. After fluctuating in strength over the following few days, a steady weakening trend established itself by November 5 as the typhoon accelerated towards the northeast. On October 8, Keith transitioned into an extratropical cyclone and was last noted early the following day near the International Dateline.

Despite Typhoon Keith's close passage to the islands of Rota and Tinian as a powerful storm, neither island received sustained winds over 160 km/h (105 mph). However, these winds resulted in significant damage across the island chain. More than 800 homes were damaged or destroyed by the storm and losses amounted to $15 million (1997 USD). There were no reports of fatalities in relation to the storm; however, one person was injured.

Typhoon Labuyo (disambiguation)

The name Labuyo has been assigned by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) to two tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific since 2001.

Typhoon Lekima (2001) (T0119, 23W, Labuyo)

Typhoon Damrey (2005) (T0518, 17W, Labuyo)

Severe Tropical Storm Dujuan (2009) (T0912, 13W, Labuyo)

Typhoon Utor (2013) (T1311, 11W, Labuyo)After Typhoon Utor caused over PHP1 billion of damage,the name Labuyo was retired and replaced by Lannie.

- Typhoon Talim (2017) (T1720, 20W, Lannie)

Typhoon Lekima (2013)

Typhoon Lekima was the second most intense tropical cyclone worldwide in 2013, as well as the twenty-ninth named storm and the eleventh typhoon of the annual typhoon season. It developed into a tropical storm late on October 20. After Lekima intensified into a typhoon and underwent rapid deepening in a very favourable environment on October 22, the system reached peak intensity on the following day. Maintaining its strength for over one day, Lekima began to weaken on October 24, as stronger vertical wind shear and mid-latitude westerlies began to make the typhoon significantly decay. On October 26, Lekima transitioned into an extratropical cyclone east of Japan.

Despite its violent strength, Lekima caused minimal damage because it did not affect populated places.

Typhoon Lekima (2019)

Typhoon Lekima, known in the Philippines as the Typhoon Hanna, was the second-costliest typhoon in Chinese history, only behind Fitow in 2013. The ninth named storm of the 2019 Pacific typhoon season, Lekima originated from a tropical depression that formed east of the Philippines on July 30. It gradually organized, became a tropical storm and was named on August 4. Lekima intensified under favourable environmental conditions and peaked as a Category 4–equivalent super typhoon. However, an eyewall replacement cycle caused the typhoon to weaken before it made landfall in Zhejiang late on August 9, as a Category 2–equivalent typhoon. Lekima weakened subsequently while moving across the East China, and made its second landfall in Shandong on August 11.

Lekima's precursor enhanced the southwestern monsoon in the Philippines, which brought heavy rain to the country. The rains caused three boats to sink and 31 people died in this accident. Lekima brought catastrophic damage in mainland China, with a death toll of 89 people and more than CN¥53.7 billion (US$7.6 billion) in damages. The system also caused minor damage in Ryukyu Islands and Taiwan.

Typhoon Nuri (2014)

Typhoon Nuri, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Paeng, was the third most intense tropical cyclone worldwide in 2014. Nuri developed into a tropical storm and received the name Paeng from the PAGASA on October 31, before it intensified into a typhoon on the next day. Under excellent conditions, especially the synoptic scale outflow, Nuri underwent rapid deepening and reached its peak intensity on November 2, forming a round eye in a symmetric Central dense overcast (CDO). Having maintained the impressive structure for over one day, the typhoon began to weaken on November 4, with a cloud-filled eye.Because of increasing vertical wind shear from the mid-latitude westerlies, Nuri lost the eye on November 5, and deep convection continued to diminish. The storm accelerated northeastward and completely became extratropical on November 6. However, on November 7, Nuri's circulation split, and the new center absorbed the storm.

Typhoon Yuri (1991)

Super Typhoon Yuri was the most intense tropical cyclone in 1991 In terms of minimum central pressure. The nineteenth typhoon and final super typhoon of the 1991 Pacific typhoon season, Yuri was a tropical disturbance that strengthened into a tropical depression on November 22 in the Philippine Sea. Moving rather slowly at first, the system continued to intensify, and was given the name Yuri. It had become a severe tropical storm about 1,480 kilometers east of Truk Island and took on a west-northwestward track at 22 km/h. Typhoon intensity was attained that night when Yuri was 1,050 km. Yuri turned more to the west on 26 November and reached peak intensity the following morning packing winds of over 220 km/h near its centre. Moving northwestwards at 30 km/h, Yuri passed 140 km to the south-southwest of Guam on the evening of November 27. After recurving November 29, Yuri accelerated northeastwards on November 30 and weakened to a severe tropical storm that night. By the morning of December 1, it had degenerated into a tropical storm about a few hundred kilometers east-northeast of Iwo Jima. Extratropical transition was completed soon afterward, and the storm's remnants persisted until December 3.Although Yuri never directly made landfall, it still had managed to cause $3 million (1991 USD) in damage to Pohnpei, including the loss of a radio tower. In Guam, the storm caused extensive beach erosion and destroyed between 60 and 350 buildings. There, damage totaled $33 million (1991 USD). It is one of the most closely observed storms ever; its eye was studied for research.

Wenling

Wenling (Wenling dialect: Ueng-ling Zy [ʔuəŋ ʔliŋ zɿ]; simplified Chinese: 温岭市; traditional Chinese: 溫嶺市; pinyin: Wēnlǐng Shì) is a coastal county-level city in the municipal region of Taizhou, in southeastern Zhejiang province, China. It borders Luqiao and Huangyan to the north, Yuhuan to the south, Yueqing to the west, looks out to the East China Sea to the east. Wenling locates on 28°22'N, 121°21'E, approximately 300 km (190 mi) south of Shanghai.

Jiangxia Tidal Power Station is located there as well as a number of e-waste recycling centers which have contributed to soil contamination in the region.Because of its geographical location, Wenling has long been suffered from typhoons. In August 12 2004, Typhoon Rananim, the six strongest typhoon in PRC history, landed in Shitang Town, Wenling. In August 10 2019, Typhoon Lekima, the third strongest in PRC history, landed in Chengnan Town, Wenling.

One can walk from Greenville, Liberia to Wenling, China in a theoretical straight line.

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