Tyler Zeller

Tyler Paul Zeller (born January 17, 1990) is an American professional basketball player for the Memphis Grizzlies of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He is the nephew of former NBA player Al Eberhard, and the brother of fellow NBA players Cody Zeller and Luke Zeller.

Tyler Zeller
US Navy 111027-N-QF368-685 Tyler Zeller competes in an exhibition basketball game
Zeller with the North Carolina Tar Heels
No. 45 – Memphis Grizzlies
PositionCenter
LeagueNBA
Personal information
BornJanuary 17, 1990 (age 29)
Visalia, California
NationalityAmerican
Listed height7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)
Listed weight252 lb (114 kg)
Career information
High schoolWashington (Washington, Indiana)
CollegeNorth Carolina (2008–2012)
NBA draft2012 / Round: 1 / Pick: 17th overall
Selected by the Dallas Mavericks
Playing career2012–present
Career history
20122014Cleveland Cavaliers
20142017Boston Celtics
2017–2018Brooklyn Nets
2018Milwaukee Bucks
2019Atlanta Hawks
2019–presentMemphis Grizzlies
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com

High school career

Born in Visalia, California,[1] Tyler Zeller grew up in Washington, Indiana, attending Washington High School. In his four years at Washington High, his team won four sectional titles, as well as state Class 3A championships in his freshman and senior years (2005 and 2008). In his senior year, he averaged 33.1 points and 11.0 rebounds per game, and also shot 69% from the field and 82% from the free throw line. In his final high school game, the '08 Class 3A final against Fort Wayne Harding, he scored 47 points, which broke a record for scoring by a player in an Indiana boys' state championship game that had stood since 1970. He was not only a basketball superstar, but also played on Washington High's tennis team for three years, and finished his high school career with a 3.99 grade point average on a 4.0 scale, good for third in his graduating class. After the 2008 season, he was named "Mr. Basketball" in Indiana, the state's highest honor for high school players. He received the title three years after his brother Luke and three years before his brother Cody were honored with the same award. He was also named a McDonald's All-American,[1] as well as a first-team Parade All-American.

During the early stages of the signing period in November 2007, Zeller signed a letter of intent to play at North Carolina. When the university announced his signing, Tar Heels head coach Roy Williams said about Zeller, "I think he is the finest running big man in the country and he has a tremendous shooting touch to go with that ability to run the floor."[2] Zeller notably exhibited that shooting touch at a high school all-star game during the 2008 Kentucky Derby Festival, at which he won the event's three-point shooting contest.[1]

Considered a four-star recruit by Rivals.com, Zeller was listed as the No. 7 center and the No. 33 player in the nation in 2008.[3]

College career

Zeller started the first two games of the 2008–09 season in place of the previous season's consensus national Player of the Year, Tyler Hansbrough, who was sidelined with a stress reaction in his right shin. In his first game, he scored 18 points in Carolina's season-opening win over Penn.[4]

The Tar Heels' next game, on November 18, was against another equally storied team, Kentucky. The Heels scored a surprisingly easy 77–58 win over the Wildcats, but suffered another injury blow, this time involving Zeller. With 1:26 left in the game, Zeller went for a breakaway dunk off a turnover, but was fouled by Kentucky's Ramon Harris before he could score. Zeller fell to the floor awkwardly, got up, and was taken to the locker room holding his left wrist.[4]

X-rays showed that Zeller had broken both of the major bones in his lower left arm (the radius and ulna). The day after the injury, he had surgery at UNC Hospitals to repair the broken bones.[5] In early January 2009, Zeller's cast was removed.

Zeller made his return during his freshman season on February 18, 2009, in the Tar Heels' home game against North Carolina State, playing 8 minutes and scoring 2 points.

As a sophomore, Zeller averaged 9.3 points per game on 52.1% shooting and 4.6 rebounds per game in limited action off the bench.[6]

Zeller averaged 15.7 points per game during his junior year. He shot 54.7% and averaged 7.2 rebounds per game. He had a more active role, playing an average of 28.1 minutes per game, significantly more than the 17.4 minutes per game during his sophomore campaign.[7]

Zeller averaged 16.5 points per game on 55.3% shooting during his senior season. He also played an average of 28.2 minutes per game.[7]

Zeller was voted to the All-ACC First Team his senior year and was named the ACC Player of the Year.[8] Zeller was also named a second team all American by the Sporting News and the USBWA as a senior. Both accolades made him eligible to have his jersey honored in the rafters of the Smith Center at the conclusion of his college career.

Professional career

Cleveland Cavaliers (2012–2014)

Zeller announced that he was entering the 2012 NBA draft along with North Carolina teammates Harrison Barnes, Kendall Marshall and John Henson. He was selected by the Dallas Mavericks with the 17th pick in the draft, and was the fourth Tar Heel to be selected in the first round. He was subsequently traded to the Cleveland Cavaliers on draft night, and signed his rookie scale contract with the Cavaliers on July 5, 2012.[9]

On October 11, 2013, Zeller underwent an emergency appendectomy procedure to remove his appendix and was subsequently ruled out indefinitely.[10][11] He recovered from the surgery in time to face the Brooklyn Nets in the team's 2013–14 season opener on October 30.[12]

On March 22, 2014, Zeller scored a then career-high 23 points in a 118–111 loss to the Houston Rockets.[13]

Boston Celtics (2014–2017)

On July 10, 2014, Zeller was traded to the Boston Celtics in a three-team trade that also involved the Cavaliers and the Brooklyn Nets.[14] On December 5, 2014, he scored a then career-high 24 points on 10-of-11 shooting in a 113–96 win over the Los Angeles Lakers.[15] He set a new career high on March 16, 2015 against the Philadelphia 76ers, scoring 26 points on 11-of-15 shooting to help the Celtics defeat the 76ers, 108–89.[16]

Zeller started the 2015–16 season as the Celtics' starting center, but moved to the bench after just three games. Over the Celtics' first 25 games of the season, Zeller logged nine DNPs.[17] On December 16, he scored a season-high 12 points in a loss to the Detroit Pistons, hitting 5-of-7 from the field in less than ten minutes.[18] Zeller began to see increased minutes in early February, recording two 16-point games on February 2 against the New York Knicks, and on February 5 against the Cleveland Cavaliers, both wins.[17] On February 7, he again set a season high, scoring 17 points in a 128–119 win over the Sacramento Kings.[19] On April 8, he tied a career high with 26 points in a 124–109 win over the Milwaukee Bucks.[20]

On June 29, 2016, the Celtics tendered a qualifying offer to make Zeller a restricted free agent.[21] He went on to re-sign with the Celtics on July 27, 2016.[22] On July 2, 2017, he was waived by the Celtics.[23]

Brooklyn Nets (2017–2018)

On September 12, 2017, Zeller signed a multi-year contract with the Brooklyn Nets.[24]

Milwaukee Bucks (2018)

On February 5, 2018, Zeller was traded to the Milwaukee Bucks in exchange for Rashad Vaughn and the rights to a future second-round draft pick.[25] On October 13, 2018, he was waived by the Bucks.[26]

Atlanta Hawks (2019)

On March 7, 2019, Zeller signed a 10-day contract with the Atlanta Hawks.[27] He was not retained by the Hawks upon the expiration of the 10-day contract.

Memphis Grizzlies (2019–present)

On April 5, 2019, Zeller signed with the Memphis Grizzlies [28] for the remainder of the season.

Career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

NBA

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2012–13 Cleveland 77 55 26.4 .438 .000 .764 5.7 1.2 .5 .9 7.9
2013–14 Cleveland 70 9 15.0 .538 .000 .719 4.0 .5 .3 .5 5.7
2014–15 Boston 82 59 21.1 .549 .823 5.7 1.4 .2 .6 10.2
2015–16 Boston 60 3 11.8 .476 .815 3.0 .5 .2 .4 6.1
2016–17 Boston 51 5 10.3 .494 .000 .564 2.4 .8 .1 .4 3.5
2017–18 Brooklyn 42 33 16.7 .546 .385 .667 4.6 .7 .2 .5 7.1
2017–18 Milwaukee 24 1 16.9 .590 .000 .895 4.6 .8 .3 .6 5.9
2018–19 Atlanta 2 0 5.5 .000 .000 - 3.0 .5 .0 .0 0.0
2018–19 Memphis 4 1 20.5 .571 - .778 4.5 .8 .3 .8 11.5
Career 412 166 17.6 .509 .286 .764 4.4 .9 .3 .6 7.0

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2015 Boston 4 4 22.5 .517 .800 4.5 .5 .5 .3 8.5
2016 Boston 3 0 12.7 .467 .667 5.0 .7 .0 .7 6.0
2017 Boston 11 0 7.1 .520 .750 1.7 .7 .0 .2 2.9
2018 Milwaukee 7 3 9.4 .800 .750 2.0 .4 .6 .4 1.6
Career 25 7 10.9 .527 .739 2.6 .6 .2 .3 3.8

College

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2008–09 North Carolina 15 2 7.8 .472 .765 2.0 .2 .2 .2 3.1
2009–10 North Carolina 27 0 17.3 .521 .0 .722 4.6 .3 .5 .9 9.3
2010–11 North Carolina 37 35 28.1 .549 .759 7.2 .6 .7 1.2 15.8
2011–12 North Carolina 38 38 28.2 .553 .808 9.6 .9 .9 1.5 16.3
Career 117 75 23.0 .543 .0 .775 6.7 .6 .7 1.1 12.8

References

  1. ^ a b c "Tyler Zeller". University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Athletic Department. Retrieved March 12, 2011.
  2. ^ "Tar Heels Sign Three To NCAA Letters Of Intent" (Press release). University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Athletic Department. 2007-11-14. Retrieved 2008-11-20.
  3. ^ Tyler Zeller Recruiting Profile
  4. ^ a b "Thompson powers Hansbrough-less UNC past Kentucky; Zeller hurts wrist". ESPN. Associated Press. 2008-11-18. Retrieved 2008-11-20.
  5. ^ Katz, Andy (2008-11-19). "Broken wrist likely to sideline UNC forward Zeller for season". ESPN. Retrieved 2008-11-20.
  6. ^ "Tyler Zeller Career Stats". CarolinaDaily.com. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  7. ^ a b "Tyler Zeller". ESPN. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  8. ^ Zeller Named ACC Player Of The Year – NORTH CAROLINA OFFICIAL ATHLETIC SITE. Tarheelblue.cstv.com (2012-03-06). Retrieved on 2012-03-12.
  9. ^ Cavs sign Dion Waiters, Tyler Zeller
  10. ^ Cavaliers Preseason: Tyler Zeller has Emergency Appendectomy, Out Indefinitely
  11. ^ Cleveland Cavaliers' Tyler Zeller has appendectomy
  12. ^ Do you remember Tyler Zeller? After missing the entire preseason, the Cavaliers center is working to return to form
  13. ^ James Harden scores 37 as Rockets cruise past Cavs
  14. ^ Celtics Complete Three-Team Trade
  15. ^ Zeller leads Celtics to 113-96 win over Lakers
  16. ^ Celtics win 5th straight, 108-89 over 76ers
  17. ^ a b Tyler Zeller 2015-16 Game Log
  18. ^ Stellar Tyler Zeller not enough to boost tired Celtics
  19. ^ Avery Bradley's 25 points helps Celtics beat Kings
  20. ^ Zeller scores 26, Celtics down Bucks 124-109
  21. ^ Bulpett, Steve (June 29, 2016). "Celtics to give qualifying offers to Jared Sullinger, Tyler Zeller". Boston Herald. Retrieved 13 July 2016.
  22. ^ "Celtics Sign Five Players". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. July 27, 2016. Retrieved July 27, 2016.
  23. ^ Smith, Keith P. (July 2, 2017). "Celtics waive Tyler Zeller". CelticsBlog.com. SB Nation. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  24. ^ "NETS SIGN TYLER ZELLER". NBA.com. September 12, 2017. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  25. ^ "BUCKS ACQUIRE TYLER ZELLER FROM BROOKLYN NETS". NBA.com. February 5, 2018. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  26. ^ "Bucks request waivers on center Tyler Zeller". FoxSports.com. October 13, 2018. Retrieved October 14, 2018.
  27. ^ "Hawks Sign Tyler Zeller To 10-Day Contract". NBA.com. March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 8, 2019.
  28. ^ "Memphis Grizzlies sign Tyler Zeller for remainder of the 2018-19 season". NBA.com. April 5, 2019. Retrieved April 6, 2019.

External links

2008–09 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team

The 2008–09 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The head coach was Roy Williams. The team played its home games in the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. The team won the 2009 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, the fifth NCAA national title in school history.

2009–10 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team

The 2009–10 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their head coach was Roy Williams. The team played its home games in the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and is a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They were the defending National Champions. This season represented the 100th season of basketball in the school's history.

The Tar Heels finished the season 20–17, 5–11 in ACC play and lost in the first round of the 2010 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament. They received an invitation to the 2010 National Invitation Tournament where they advanced to the championship game before falling to Dayton.

2010–11 Atlantic Coast Conference men's basketball season

The 2010–11 Atlantic Coast Conference men's basketball season was the 58th season for the league.

2011 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 2011 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the Sporting News (TSN), and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) for the 2010–11 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors choose at least a first and second 5-man team. The NABC, TSN and AP choose third teams, while AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 2011 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since United Press International was replaced by TSN in 1997, the four major selectors have been the aforementioned ones. AP has been a selector since 1948, NABC since 1957 and USBWA since 1960. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors based on a point system computed from the four different all-America teams. The point system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. No honorable mention or fourth team or lower are used in the computation. The top five totals plus ties are first team and the next five plus ties are second team.Although the aforementioned lists are used to determine consensus honors, there are numerous other All-American lists. The ten finalists for the John Wooden Award are described as Wooden All-Americans. The ten finalists for the Lowe's Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans. Other All-American lists include those determined by Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports. The scholar-athletes selected by College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) are termed Academic All-Americans.

2012 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2012 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament, part of the 2011–12 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, took place from March 8–11 at the Philips Arena in Atlanta. The Florida State Seminoles gave the state of Florida its first-ever ACC tournament win, capturing their first ACC championship in their 21st season in the league.

2012 NBA draft

The 2012 NBA Draft was held on June 28, 2012, at Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey. The draft started at 7:00 pm Eastern Daylight Time (2300 UTC), and was broadcast in the United States on ESPN. In this draft, National Basketball Association (NBA) teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. This draft marked the first time that the first two players selected were from the same school (Anthony Davis and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist were teammates at Kentucky). It also set a record of having six players from one school (Kentucky) being selected in the two rounds of the draft and was the first draft to have the first three selections be college freshmen all from the same conference, the Southeastern Conference. Not only that, but it also featured the oldest player to ever get selected in an NBA draft, with Bernard James being 27 years old at the time of the draft. Of the players drafted, 30 are forwards, 21 are guards, and 9 are centers.

The 2012 NBA draft marked the first appearance of the Brooklyn Nets. This draft also marks the last draft appearance for the New Orleans Hornets. After the 2012–13 season, the franchise was renamed as the New Orleans Pelicans. New Orleans made their first draft appearance as the Pelicans in 2013.

2012 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 2012 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the Sporting News (TSN), and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) for the 2011–12 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors choose at least a first and second 5-man team. The NABC, TSN and AP choose third teams, while AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 2012 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since United Press International was replaced by TSN in 1997, the four major selectors have been the aforementioned ones. AP has been a selector since 1948, NABC since 1957 and USBWA since 1960. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors based on a point system computed from the four different all-America teams. The point system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. No honorable mention or fourth team or lower are used in the computation. The top five totals plus ties are first team and the next five plus ties are second team.Although the aforementioned lists are used to determine consensus honors, there are numerous other All-American lists. The ten finalists for the John Wooden Award are described as Wooden All-Americans. The ten finalists for the Lowe's Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans. Other All-American lists include those determined by Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports. The scholar-athletes selected by College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) are termed Academic All-Americans.

2012–13 Cleveland Cavaliers season

The 2012–13 Cleveland Cavaliers season was the 43rd season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

2013–14 Cleveland Cavaliers season

The 2013–14 Cleveland Cavaliers season was the 44th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

2014–15 Boston Celtics season

The 2014–15 Boston Celtics season was the 69th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA)., The Boston Celtics finished the regular season with a 40–42 won-loss record, which was the 2nd best in the Atlantic division

The Celtics made several transactions during the season. Rajon Rondo was traded to the Dallas Mavericks on December 18, 2014, Austin Rivers was acquired from the New Orleans Pelicans on January 12, but three days later, he was again traded to the Los Angeles Clippers after refusing to suit up for the Celtics, and in February, Isaiah Thomas was acquired from the Phoenix Suns.

On March 9, 2015, the Celtics passed the previous season's win total of 25 with a 100–90 win over the Miami Heat.

On April 13, 2015, the Celtics qualified for the playoffs for the 7th time in the last 8 seasons and for the first time since 2012–13. Their season ended after being swept in the first round playoff series by the Cleveland Cavaliers.

2017–18 Brooklyn Nets season

The 2017–18 Brooklyn Nets season was the 42nd season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA), 51st season overall, and its 6th season playing in the New York City borough of Brooklyn.

Al Eberhard

Allen Dean Eberhard (born May 10, 1952) is a retired American basketball player. He was drafted with the fifteenth pick in the first round of the 1974 NBA draft and played four seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Detroit Pistons, averaging 6.8 points per game and 3.5 rebounds per game in 220 career games. He is the uncle of former Indiana Hoosiers and current Charlotte Hornets basketball player Cody Zeller, former North Carolina Tar Heels player Tyler Zeller, and former Notre Dame Fighting Irish and former Phoenix Suns player Luke Zeller.

Cody Zeller

Cody Allen Zeller (born October 5, 1992) is an American professional basketball player for the Charlotte Hornets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the Indiana Hoosiers. Zeller was selected with the fourth overall pick in the 2013 NBA draft by the Charlotte Bobcats. He is the brother of NBA players Tyler and Luke, and the nephew of former NBA player Al Eberhard.

List of North Carolina Tar Heels basketball honorees

The North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team was founded in 1910 to represent the University of North Carolin in intercollegiate competition and has participated in the sport all but one season since its inception. Over the course of the team's history, the Tar Heels' performance has ranged from losing records to undefeated seasons resulting in a national championship.

During periods of both ascendancy and mediocrity, individual North Carolina players of exceptional ability have received various accolades. In total, Tar Heels have been named to an All-America team 83 times, an All-Atlantic Coast Conference team 138 times, and an All-Southern Conference team 34 times. Of the All-America selections, thirty-seven players received first-team honors a total of fifty-eight times. Sixteen players were named consensus first-team All-Americans a total of twenty-five times.

Tar Heels have won several nationally recognized individual awards, including the Bob Cousy Award, the Senior CLASS Award, Academic All-America of the Year, and several of the National Player of the Year awards. The College Basketball Hall of Fame has inducted four former North Carolina players, and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame has enshrined three. Five former North Carolina head coaches have also been inducted into the College Basketball Hall of Fame.

List of people from Visalia, California

The following is a list of notable people who were born in, or are residents of, or otherwise closely associated with the city of Visalia, California. Those born in Visalia have their names printed in bold. Note that Visalia natives are also referred to as Visalians.

Milwaukee Bucks all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Milwaukee Bucks NBA franchise.

Tar Heel Sports Network

The Tar Heel Sports Network is a radio network in the United States dedicated to broadcasting live events and programming relating to North Carolina Tar Heels athletics. It is operated by Tar Heel Sports Properties, a property of Learfield Communications, Inc., which manages the multimedia rights for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Network's flagship station is WCHL-AM of Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The network began in the early 1960s when WSOC in Charlotte made the first attempt to create a radio network for Tar Heel men's basketball outside the Triangle. In 1965, WSOC owner Cox Broadcasting sold the network to WCHL's owner, Village Broadcasting, which gradually evolved into VilCom. Learfield bought the network from VilCom in the late 1990s.

The Network consists mainly of local radio affiliates within North Carolina, southern Virginia, and northern South Carolina. Some stations with local interest carry only football or basketball programming. For example, WAMW-FM of Washington, Indiana, the hometown of Tyler Zeller, aired men's basketball from 2009 to 2012.

The Network's lead commentator for football and men's basketball games was Woody Durham until his retirement in 2011. Jones Angell succeeded Durham as "the Voice of the Tar Heels" for both football and basketball beginning with the 2011 football season. Coaches Larry Fedora (football), Mike Fox (baseball), Sylvia Hatchell (women's basketball), and Roy Williams (men's basketball) host programs on the Network during their respective team's season.

The state's most powerful station, WBT in Charlotte, has been an affiliate of the network since 1971, except for 1991 to 1995 and 2006 to 2012. WBT is a 50,000-watt clear-channel station that reaches parts of 22 states at night, bringing the Tar Heels' broadcasts to most of the eastern half of North America. According to longtime WBT station manager Cullie Tarleton, putting the Tar Heels on WBT was largely the idea of longtime coach Dean Smith, who wanted to tell recruits from New England that their parents would be able to listen to the games. From 2006 to 2012, WFNZ served as the network's Charlotte outlet, but its weak nighttime signal forced the Tar Heels to contract first with WRFX (2006-2011) and WNOW-FM (2011-2012) to air basketball games as well as football games that kicked off after 5 pm. The Tar Heels returned to WBT beginning with the 2012 football season.

Washington High School (Washington, Indiana)

Washington High School is a high school in Washington, Indiana. Its athletic mascot is "The Hatchets". The School's primary colors are old gold and black. WHS plays in the Big Eight Conference. WHS is also a 3A School in Athletics.

Zeller (surname)

Zeller is a German surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Adolf Guyer-Zeller (1839–1899), Swiss entrepreneur

Adrien Zeller (1940–2009), French politician

André Zeller (1898–1979), French general

Carl Zeller (1842–1898), Austrian operetta composer

Christian Zeller (1822–1899), German minister and creator of Zeller's congruence

Christopher Zeller (born 1984), German field hockey player

Cody Zeller (born 1992), American basketball player, brother of Luke and Tyler Zeller

Eduard Zeller (1814–1908), German philosopher

Eva Zeller (born 1923), German poet

Florian Zeller (born 1979), French novelist and playwright

Heidi Zeller-Bähler (born 1967), Swiss skier

Jo Zeller (born 1955), Swiss racing driver

John Zeller (1830–1902), German missionary

Joseph Zeller (1918-2018), American politician

Jules Sylvain Zeller (1820–1900), French historian

Karl Longin Zeller (1924–2006), German mathematician

Katrin Zeller (born 1979), German cross country skier

Luke Zeller (born 1987), American basketball player, brother of Cody and Tyler Zeller

Philipp Zeller (born 1983), German field hockey player

Philipp Christoph Zeller (1808–1883), German entomologist

Sanford Myron Zeller (1885–1948), American mycologist

Tyler Zeller (born 1990), American basketball player, brother of Cody and Luke Zeller

Walter Zeller (motorcyclist) (1928–1995), German motorcycle racer

Walter P. Zeller (1890–1957), Canadian businessman

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