Twenty20 International

A Twenty20 International (T20I) is a form of cricket, played between two of the international members of the International Cricket Council (ICC), in which each team faces twenty overs. The matches have top-class status and are the highest T20 standard. The game is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. Starting from the format's inception in 2005, T20I status only applied to Full Members and some Associate Member teams. However, in April 2018, the ICC announced that it would grant T20I status to all its 105 members from 1 January 2019.

The shortened format was initially introduced to bolster crowds for the domestic game, and was not intended to be played internationally, but the first Twenty20 International took place on 17 February 2005 when Australia defeated New Zealand, and the first tournament was played two years later, with the introduction of the ICC T20 World Cup. In 2016, for the first time in a calendar year, more Twenty20 International matches (100) were played than ODI matches (99).[1] There remain limits on how many Twenty20 Internationals a team can play each year, in order to protect Test cricket and One Day Internationals. As of 3 May 2019, 80 nations feature in ICC T20I team rankings.[2][3]

Twenty20 International format also sees one mandatory powerplay taken in the first six overs. This shorter format of the game makes reaching the traditional milestones of scoring a century or taking five wickets in an innings more difficult, and few players have achieved these. The highest individual score in a Twenty20 International is 172, made by Australia's Aaron Finch against Zimbabwe in 2018, while Sri Lanka's Ajantha Mendis and India's Yuzvendra Chahal are the only bowlers to have taken two six wickets in an innings, and fewer than twenty players have taken five wickets in an innings.

England vs Sri Lanka
A Twenty20 International between England and Sri Lanka in June 2006

Origins

Cricket itself was probably first played in England in the Late Middle Ages, but it did not rise to prominence until the eighteenth century. A set of laws were drawn up in 1744, and the game achieved a level of relative standardisation by the late nineteenth century.[4] One-day cricket was trialled in 1962, and the first domestic tournament played the following year,[5] and in 1971, England and Australia contested the first One Day International. The match consisted of one innings for each side, with 40 eight-ball overs.[6]

In the 1990s, a number of countries were exploring the possibility of a shorter game still: in New Zealand, Martin Crowe developed Cricket Max, in which each team bats for 10 eight-ball overs,[7] while in Australia they considered an eight-a-side contest they dubbed "Super 8s". At the same time, the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) conducted consumer research, and proposed the idea of a 20 overs-per-side contest, which would last for about three hours.[8] The first match was played in 2003 between Hampshire and Sussex.[9]

History

The first Twenty20 International match between two men's sides was played on 17 February 2005, involving Australia and New Zealand. Wisden Cricketers' Almanack reported that "neither side took the game especially seriously",[10] and it was noted by ESPNcricinfo that but for a large score for Ricky Ponting, "the concept would have shuddered".[11] However, Ponting himself said "if it does become an international game then I'm sure the novelty won't be there all the time".[12]

Two further matches were played that year; England beat Australia in June, and South Africa were defeated by New Zealand in October.[13] Early the following year, a contest between New Zealand and the West Indies finished as the first tied match, and a tiebreak was played for the first time in men's international cricket: the two sides took part in a bowl-out to determine a winner; New Zealand won 3–0.[14]

The game had initially been developed to boost the interest in domestic cricket, and to aid this the international teams were only allowed to host three T20Is each year. The cricket manager for the ICC, David Richardson, also commented that "Part of the success of Twenty20 cricket is making sure it can coexist with Test cricket and one-dayers."[15] Despite this, the first international tournament was held in 2007 in South Africa; the 2007 ICC World Twenty20.[15] That tournament was won by India, who defeated their close rivals Pakistan in the final. Writing for The Guardian, Dilip Premachandran suggested that the competition's success meant that "the format is here to stay".[16] The next tournament was scheduled for 2009, and it was decided that they would take place biannually (more frequently than the 50 over Cricket World Cup, which occurs once every four years).[17] In the opening match of the 2007 World Twenty20, Chris Gayle scored the first century in a T20I, the achievement being reached in the twentieth match of the format.[18]

The 500th T20I match was contested between Ireland and the United Arab Emirates at the Sheikh Zayed Stadium, Abu Dhabi on 16 February 2016.[19]

ICC decided to use Umpire Decision Review System (DRS) in Twenty20 Internationals from the end of September 2017,[20][21] with its first use in the India-Australia T20I series in October 2017.[22]

Current international rankings

Current ICC members by membership status:      Full members (12)
     Associate members with ODI status (8)
     Associate members (85)
     Former members (4)
     Non-members
ICC T20I Championship
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1  Pakistan 26 7365 283
2  England 16 4253 266
3  South Africa 16 4196 262
4  Australia 21 5471 261
5  India 28 7273 260
6  New Zealand 16 4056 254
7  Afghanistan 16 3849 241
8  Sri Lanka 18 4093 227
9  West Indies 21 4747 226
10  Bangladesh 16 3525 220
11    Nepal 8 1698 212
12  Scotland 11 2185 199
14  Zimbabwe 9 1730 187
13  Netherlands 9 1686 193
15  Ireland 19 3455 182
16  United Arab Emirates 14 2527 181
17  Papua New Guinea 17 2920 172
18  Oman 5 774 155
19  Hong Kong 8 1213 152
20  Namibia 12 1729 144
21  Qatar 11 1421 129
26  Italy 10 1214 111
22  Saudi Arabia 11 1331 121
23  Singapore 10 1181 118
24  Jersey 14 1587 115
25  Canada 8 887 111
29  Denmark 8 870 101
27  Kuwait 7 727 104
28  Kenya 11 1105 102
37  Norway 7 609 87
31  United States 9 758 84
32  Botswana 14 1142 82
33  Ghana 10 773 77
34  Uganda 14 1069 76
35  Austria 6 439 73
36  Malaysia 12 877 73
30  Germany 15 1074 85
38  Nigeria 10 708 71
39  Guernsey 14 887 70
40  Sweden 8 465 58
41  Tanzania 6 334 56
42  Luxembourg 6 328 55
43  Spain 9 479 53
44  Philippines 9 433 48
45  France 6 267 45
46  Belize 9 377 42
47  Peru 9 356 40
48  Bahrain 7 261 37
49  Mexico 12 426 36
50  Fiji 6 210 35
51  Samoa 6 205 34
52  Vanuatu 10 330 33
53  Panama 9 291 32
54  Belgium 9 290 32
55  Japan 10 317 32
56  Costa Rica 8 252 32
57  Thailand 10 313 31
58  Argentina 12 370 31
59  Hungary 6 180 30
60  Mozambique 12 352 29
61  Chile 10 249 25
62  Malawi 12 297 25
63  Israel 7 173 25
64  Bhutan 8 180 23
65  Finland 8 177 22
66  South Korea 10 217 22
67  Isle of Man 7 149 21
68  Malta 11 158 14
69  Bulgaria 5 68 14
70  Sierra Leone 5 61 12
71  Brazil 9 108 12
72  Czech Republic 10 91 9
73  Saint Helena 12 109 9
74  Maldives 8 63 8
75  Gibraltar 8 35 4
76  Myanmar 9 23 3
77  Indonesia 7 3 0
78  China 11 0 0
79  Gambia 6 0 0
80  Swaziland 6 0 0
81  Rwanda 6 0 0
82  Lesotho 6 0 0
Reference: ICC rankings for Tests, ODIs, Twenty20 & Women ICC page, 23 June 2019
"Matches" is the number of matches played in the 12-24 months since the May before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that.

Teams with T20I status

Permanent T20I status

Prior to 2019, permanent T20I status was limited to the 12 Test-playing nations (which are also the 12 full members of the ICC). These nations are listed below, with the date of their first T20I after gaining permanent T20I status shown in brackets (Ireland and Afghanistan had played previous T20Is with Temporary status):

  1.  New Zealand (17 February 2005)
  2.  Australia (17 February 2005)
  3.  England (13 June 2005)
  4.  South Africa (21 October 2005)
  5.  West Indies (16 February 2006)
  6.  Sri Lanka (15 June 2006)
  7.  Pakistan (28 August 2006)
  8.  Bangladesh (28 November 2006)
  9.  Zimbabwe (28 November 2006)
  10.  India (1 December 2006)
  11.  Afghanistan (5 February 2018)
  12.  Ireland (12 June 2018)

Teams that played T20I after 1 January 2019

In April 2018, the ICC announced that it would grant T20I status to all of its 105 members from 1 January 2019, with the date of their first T20I after gaining T20I status shown in brackets:[23][2][24]

The following countries have now played T20 Internationals from 1 January 2019:

  1.  Bahrain (20 January 2019)
  2.  Saudi Arabia (20 January 2019)
  3.  Maldives (20 January 2019)
  4.  Kuwait (20 January 2019)
  5.  Qatar (21 January 2019)
  6.  United Arab Emirates (31 January 2019)
  7.    Nepal (31 January 2019)
  8.  Oman (13 February 2019)
  9.  Scotland (13 February 2019)
  10.  Netherlands (13 February 2019)
  11.  United States (15 March 2019)
  12.  Papua New Guinea (22 March 2019)
  13.  Philippines (22 March 2019)
  14.  Vanuatu (22 March 2019)
  15.  Spain (29 March 2019)
  16.  Malta (29 March 2019)
  17.  Mexico (25 April 2019)
  18.  Belize (25 April 2019)
  19.  Costa Rica (25 April 2019)
  20.  Panama (25 April 2019)
  21.  Belgium (11 May 2019)
  22.  Germany (11 May 2019)
  23.  Uganda (20 May 2019)
  24.  Nigeria (20 May 2019)
  25.  Kenya (20 May 2019)
  26.  Ghana (20 May 2019)
  27.  Namibia (20 May 2019)
  28.  Botswana (20 May 2019)
  29.  Italy (25 May 2019)
  30.  Guernsey (31 May 2019)
  31.  Jersey (31 May 2019)
  32.  Norway (15 June 2019)
  33.  Denmark (16 June 2019)
  34.  Malaysia (24 June 2019)
  35.  Thailand (24 June 2019)

Temporary T20I status

Between 2005 and 2018, the ICC granted temporary ODI and T20I status to a selection of other teams (known as Associate members). Teams earned this temporary status for a period of four years based on their performance in the quadrennial ICC World Cricket League – or, more specifically, based on the top six finishing positions at the ICC World Cup Qualifier, which is the final event of the World Cricket League.[25] Teams could also earn this status by qualifying for the ICC T20 World Cup.

Twelve nations held this temporary T20I status before being promoted to T20I status or relegated after underperforming at the World Cup Qualifier or World Twenty20 Qualifier:

The ICC has also given special T20I status to the ICC World XI team for:

Cricket at international multi-sport events

Mendis bowling
Ajantha Mendis was the first player to take six wickets in a T20I

Cricket was played as part of the 1900 Summer Olympics, when England and France contested a two-day match.[28] In 1998, cricket was played as part of the Commonwealth Games, on this occasion in the 50-over format. There was some talk about Twenty20 cricket being part of the 2010 Commonwealth Games, which were held in Delhi, but at the time the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), were not in favour of the short format of the game, and it was not included.[29]

Cricket was played in 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou, China[30] and 2014 Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea.[31] India skipped both times.[32] There was further calls for subsequent Commonwealth Games and Olympic Games. The Commonwealth Games Federation asked the ICC to participate in the 2014 and 2018 Commonwealth Games, but the ICC turned down the invitation.[33] In 2010, the International Olympic Committee recognised the International Cricket Council as a governing body that complied to the requirements of the Olympic charter which in turn meant that cricket could apply to be included in the Olympic Games,[34] but in 2013 the ICC announced that it had no intentions to make such an application, primarily due to opposition from the BCCI. ESPNcricinfo suggested that the opposition might be based on the possible loss of income.[35] In April 2016, ICC chief executive David Richardson said that Twenty20 cricket can have a chance of getting in for the 2024 Summer Games, but there must be collective support shown by the ICC's membership base, in particular from BCCI, in order for there to be a chance of inclusion.[36]

Statistics

The highest team total in a T20I was made by Afghanistan versus Ireland when they scored 278/3.[37][38] The lowest total was recorded in 2014, when Sri Lanka bowled out the Netherlands for just 39 runs.[39] The highest successful chase was made in February 2018, when Australia scored 245 runs to overhaul New Zealand's target and win the match.[40]

Rohit Sharma has accrued the most runs in the format with 2,331 runs.[41] Aaron Finch has made the highest individual score in T20Is, with his innings of 172 against Zimbabwe in 2018.[42] Pakistani bowler Shahid Afridi holds the records for the most wickets, having taken 98 wickets in 99 matches.[43] Sri Lanka's Ajantha Mendis has recorded the best two set of bowling figures in T20Is, and is the first bowler to have taken six wickets in a match, doing so against both Zimbabwe in 2012, and Australia in 2011.[44]

See also

References

  1. ^ "More results, more Kohli runs, and more T20Is than ODIs".
  2. ^ a b "T20s between all ICC members to have international status".
  3. ^ "ICC Ranking for T20 teams International Cricket Council". www.icc-cricket.com. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  4. ^ Birley, Derek (2003) [1999]. A Social History of English Cricket. Aurum Press. pp. 3–107. ISBN 1-85410-941-3.
  5. ^ Williamson, Martin (9 April 2011). "The low-key birth of one-day cricket". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  6. ^ Williamson, Martin. "The birth of the one-day international". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  7. ^ "Cricket Max – The Game Invented By Martin Crowe". ESPNcricinfo. 2 February 1996. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  8. ^ "History of Twenty20 cricket". England and Wales Cricket Board. Archived from the original on 3 February 2015. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  9. ^ "Meet the man who invented Twenty20 cricket – the man missing out on millions". Daily Mail. London. 11 June 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  10. ^ Ramsay, Andrew (2006). "New Zealand v Australia". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  11. ^ English, Peter (18 February 2005). "Saved by Private Ricky". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  12. ^ "South Africa's Superman". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 17 February 2017.
  13. ^ "Records / 2005 / Twenty20 Internationals / Match results". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  14. ^ "WI beat NZ in historical tiebreaker". International Cricket Council. 26 December 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  15. ^ a b "Is twenty plenty?". ESPNcricinfo. 24 March 2007. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  16. ^ Premachandran, Dileep (26 September 2007). "Great win, but easy on the chest-thumping". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  17. ^ "Global Tournaments". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  18. ^ Gopalakrishna, HR; Vaghese, Mathew (11 September 2007). "Gayle and Gibbs run riot". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  19. ^ "(500) games of T20I cricket". cricket.com.au. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  20. ^ "Uniform DRS likely from October".
  21. ^ "ICC takes a huge decision which may slow down T20s".
  22. ^ "According to the new playing conditions which came into effect on September 28, DRS would now be used in T20 Internationals in addition to Tests and ODIs".
  23. ^ "All T20 matches between ICC members to get international status". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  24. ^ "T20s between all ICC members to have international status". ESPNcricinfo. 27 April 2018. Archived from the original on 16 November 2018. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  25. ^ "Nepal, Netherlands get T20 international status". Cricinfo. 28 June 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  26. ^ "ICC confirms plans for World XI tour to Pakistan for three-game T20 series in September". Firstpost. 24 June 2017. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  27. ^ "West Indies, Rest of the World XI to play fundraising T20I". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 21 April 2018.
  28. ^ Buchanan, Ian (1993). Mallon, Bill (ed.). "Cricket at the 1900 Games" (PDF). Journal of Olympic History. International Society of Olympic Historians. 1 (2): 4.
  29. ^ "Cricket unlikely at 2010 Games". ESPNcricinfo. 23 January 2006. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  30. ^ "Guangzhou Asian Games".
  31. ^ "2014 Asian Games".
  32. ^ "India to skip Asian Games again in 2014".
  33. ^ "ICC rejects 2018 offer, cricket stays out of Commonwealth Games". Reuters. 24 July 2014. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  34. ^ "Cricket gets Olympic approval". ESPNcricinfo. 12 February 2010. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  35. ^ Qaiser Mohammad Ali (1 July 2013). "BCCI rejects plans to make cricket an Olympic sport due to 'conflict'". Daily Mail. London. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  36. ^ "ICC's chief executive David Richardson wants to expand World T20 first round to 18 teams, have Super 12 phase".
  37. ^ "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Team records / Highest innings totals". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  38. ^ "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Team records / Largest margin of victory (by runs)". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  39. ^ "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Team records / Lowest innings totals". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  40. ^ "Statistics / Statsguru / Twenty20 Internationals / Team records". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 20 March 2018.
  41. ^ "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Batting records / Most runs in career". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  42. ^ "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Batting records / Most runs in an innings". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  43. ^ "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Bowling records / Most wickets in career". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  44. ^ "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Bowling records / Best figures in an innings". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
Lasith Malinga

Separamadu Lasith Malinga, (Sinhala: සෙපරමාදු ලසිත් මාලිංග; born 28 August 1983) is a professional Sri Lankan cricketer and current T20I captain for Sri Lanka. He bowls right-arm fast, is commonly used as a specialist death bowler, and is well known for his distinctive round-arm action, sometimes referred to as a sling action, which leads to his nicknames, "Slinga Malinga" and "Malinga the Slinga". Considered as one of the greatest limited-overs bowlers of all time, Malinga's unorthodox action and dipping slower ball yorkers are credited with much of his success.He is best known for his ability to take consecutive wickets, with in-swinging yorkers: he is the only bowler in the world to have two World Cup hat-tricks, the only bowler to have taken three hat-tricks in ODIs and the only player to have taken four wickets in four consecutive balls in any form of international cricket. On 22 April 2011, he announced his retirement from Test cricket. He has been named as the official event ambassador for the World Twenty20 Championships by ICC.He is the highest wicket taker in all Twenty20 International cricket after Pakistan's Shahid Afridi and highest wicket taker for Sri Lanka in Twenty20 Internationals as well. Malinga was the captain of the Sri Lankan cricket team that won the 2014 ICC World Twenty20 and was part of the team that made the final of 2007 Cricket World Cup, 2011 Cricket World Cup, 2009 ICC World Twenty20 and 2012 ICC World Twenty20. He was the captain of Twenty20 International side for Sri Lanka, until 7 March 2016, where Malinga stepped down from captaincy due to his continuous injuries.

List of Afghanistan T20I cricketers

A T20I is an international cricket match between two teams that have official Twenty20 International status, as determined by the International Cricket Council. It is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket and is the shortest form of the game. Afghanistan played its first T20I match on 1 February 2010, against Ireland, losing the match by 5 wickets. Their first win came three days later in their second T20I match, which was against Canada, with Afghanistan winning by 5 wickets with one ball remaining.This list comprises all members of the Afghanistan cricket team who have played at least one T20I match. It is initially arranged in the order in which each player won his first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won his first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by surname.

List of Australia Twenty20 International cricketers

Since their first match in 2005, 94 players have represented Australia in Twenty20 Internationals. A Twenty20 International is an international cricket match between two representative teams of ODI status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). A Twenty20 International is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. The list is arranged in the order in which each player won his first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won his first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by surname.

Australia have played 116 matches, winning 60 and losing 52; two were tied and two ended in a no result. Their first game was against New Zealand which was also the first ever Twenty20 International to be played. In this game they scored 214 off their 20 over which still remains the 4th highest score made in an innings by a team in Twenty20 Internationals. Their loss in their second game against England which was by 100 runs was also the fourth highest defeat in Twenty20 Internationals. David Warner is Australia's leading run scorer with 1,792 runs and Shane Watson is the leading wicket taker with 48 wickets. The highest individual score for an Australian is 172 by Aaron Finch.

List of Australia Twenty20 International wicket-keepers

This is a chronological list of Australia T20Is wicket-keepers.

This list only includes players who have played as the designated keeper for a match. On occasions, another player may have stepped in to relieve the primary wicket-keeper due to injury or the keeper bowling.

List of Bangladesh Twenty20 International cricketers

This is a list of Bangladeshi Twenty20 International cricketers. A Twenty20 International is an international cricket match between two representative teams, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). A Twenty20 International is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. The list is arranged in the order in which each player won his first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won his first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by first name.

Statistics are correct as of 22 December 2018.

List of England Twenty20 International cricketers

A Twenty20 International (T20I) is an international cricket match between two teams that have official T20I status, as determined by the International Cricket Council. It is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket and is the shortest form of the game. The first such match was played on 17 February 2005 between Australia and New Zealand. The England cricket team played its first T20I match on 13 June 2005, against Australia as part of Australia's 2005 Ashes tour, winning the match by 100 runs.England have won 54 of their 109 T20I matches. In 2010, they were crowned T20I world champions, defeating Australia by seven wickets in the final. Eoin Morgan is the current captain of the side, has made the most appearances for England in T20I playing in 79 matches and has scored the most runs of any English batsman, making 1,753 runs. Morgan has captained the side many times (37). Stuart Broad has taken more wickets than any other English bowler in T20I, dismissing 65 batsmen with an average of 22.93. Alex Hales is the only English batsman to have scored a century and holds the record for the highest score by an England player in T20I cricket, with 116 not out in a six wicket victory over Sri Lanka in March 2014.This list is of all members of the England cricket team who have played at least one T20I match. The order is by each player name as they achieved a first Twenty20 cap; achievement by several players during the same match is arranged by surname alphabetically.

List of England women Twenty20 International cricketers

This is a list of English women Twenty20 International cricketers. A Twenty20 International is an international cricket match between two representative teams, each having ODI status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). A Twenty20 International is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket.

The list is arranged in the order in which each player won her first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won her first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by surname.

List of India Twenty20 International cricket records

This is a list of India Twenty20 International Cricket Records, that is records of team and individual performances in Twenty20 International cricket. It is based on the List of Twenty20 International records.

India played its first Twenty20 game against South Africa in December 2006, and these records date from that game.

List of India Twenty20 International cricketers

A Twenty20 International (T20I) is a form of cricket match between two representative teams, each having T20I status as determined by the International Crict Council (ICC), and is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. The first such match was played between Australia and New Zealand on 17 February 2005. The Indian cricket team played its first T20I match—under the captaincy of Virender Sehwag—during the 2006–07 series in South Africa; India defeated the hosts by six wickets in the one-off match and claimed the series.As of 28 February 2019, 79 players have represented India in T20Is. Virat Kohli is the current captain of the team. Rohit Sharma is the leading run scorer for the team with 2,237 runs Sharma's 118 against Sri Lanka in December 2017 is the highest individual score in T20Is by an Indian batsman. Ravichandran Ashwin is India's leading wicket-taker in the format with 52 wickets. Yuzvendra Chahal has the best bowling figures for India in the format; his six wickets for 25 runs, against England in February 2017, are the third-best for any bowler in T20Is. India's highest total of 260 came against Sri Lanka in December 2017, while its lowest total came against Australia in 2008 when it was bowled out for 74 runs.India won the world championship at the inaugural edition of the ICC World Twenty20, defeating Pakistan by four

runs. In 2016, it won the 13th Asia Cup—the first to be played in the Twenty20 format—in Bangladesh by defeating the hosts by eight wickets.

List of New Zealand Twenty20 International cricketers

This is a list of New Zealand Twenty20 International cricketers. A Twenty20 International is an international cricket match between two representative teams, each having ODI status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). A Twenty20 International is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. The list is arranged in the order in which each player won his first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won his first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by surname.

Statistics are correct as at 10 February 2019.

List of South Africa Twenty20 International cricketers

This is a list of South Africa Twenty20 International cricketers. A Twenty20 International is an international cricket match between two representative teams, each having T20I status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). A Twenty20 International is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. The list is arranged in the order in which each player won his first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won his first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by surname.

List of South Africa women Twenty20 International cricketers

Women's Twenty20 International is a 20 overs-per-side cricket match played in a maximum of 150 minutes between two of the top 10 ranked countries of the International Cricket Council (ICC) in terms of women's cricket. The first Twenty20 International match was held in August 2004 between England and New Zealand, six months before the first Twenty20 International match was played between two men's teams. The South Africa national women's cricket team played their first Twenty20 International match at the County Ground, Taunton in 2007, facing New Zealand, as the two teams' tours of England overlapped.South Africa have played 71 Twenty20 Internationals under six different captains. In 2009, South Africa were one of eight teams which competed in the inaugural ICC Women's World Twenty20 held in England, but failed to progress beyond the group stage. They played their first home match during the 2009–10 season, hosting West Indies for three matches as part of a larger tour. South Africa's first victory in Twenty20 International cricket came against Ireland in August 2008. Mignon du Preez is South Africa's all-time leading run-scorer with 1166 runs. Shandre Fritz is the only South African women to have scored a century in a Twenty20 International, scoring the second highest total in any women's Twenty20 International with a score of 116 not out against the Netherlands. Shabnim Ismail is South Africa's leading wicket-taker with 58 wickets.Since the team was formed, 43 women have represented South Africa in Twenty20 International cricket. This list includes all players who have played at least one Twenty20 International match and is initially arranged in the order of debut appearance. Where more than one player won their first cap in the same match, those players are initially listed alphabetically by last name at the time of debut.

List of Twenty20 International records

This article contains records for men's Twenty20 Internationals.

List of West Indies Twenty20 International cricketers

This is a list of West Indian Twenty20 International cricketers. A Twenty20 International is an international cricket match between two representative teams, each having ODI status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). A Twenty20 International is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. The list is arranged in the order in which each player won his first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won his first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by surname.

Statistics are correct as at 10 March 2019.

List of Zimbabwe Twenty20 International cricketers

This is a list of Zimbabwean Twenty20 International cricketers. A Twenty20 International is an international cricket match between two representative teams, each having T20I status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). A Twenty20 International is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. The list is arranged in the order in which each player won his first Twenty20 cap. Where more than one player won his first Twenty20 cap in the same match, those players are listed alphabetically by surname.

Statistics are correct as at 23 June 2019.

List of centuries in Twenty20 International cricket

A Twenty20 International (T20I) is an international cricket match between two teams, each having T20I status, as determined by the International Cricket Council. In a T20I, the two teams play a single innings each, which is restricted to a maximum of 20 overs. The format was originally introduced by the England and Wales Cricket Board for the county cricket competition with the first matches contested on 13 June 2003 between the English counties in the Twenty20 Cup. The first T20I took place on 17 February 2005 when Australia defeated New Zealand by 44 runs at Eden Park in Auckland, with Australian captain Ricky Ponting finishing not out on 98.A century is a score of one hundred or more runs by a batsman in a single innings. This is regarded as a notable achievement. The first century in a T20I match was scored by Chris Gayle of the West Indies who made 117 against South Africa at the inaugural ICC World Twenty20 in 2007. South Africa won the match, one of only seven occurrences which did not result in a victory to the team with the player scoring the century. The most recent century, as of March 2019, was scored by Awais Ahmed of Spain against Malta at the La Manga Club Ground on 30 March 2019.India's Rohit Sharma leading the list with four T20I centuries, then New Zealand's Colin Munro and Australia's Glenn Maxwell's three, followed by New Zealand's Martin Guptill and Brendon McCullum, West Indians Chris Gayle and Evin Lewis, India's K. L. Rahul and Australia's Aaron Finch with two each. Lewis' first century came during the 2016 series against India at the Central Broward Regional Park in Lauderhill, Florida. In reply, India's Rahul finished on 110 not out, the only occasion where two T20I centuries were scored in the same match. Rahul's innings was one of the twelve instances where a batsman scored a century in the second innings of a T20I match. In July 2018, Finch posted 172 from 76 balls against Zimbabwe during the 2018 Zimbabwe Tri-Nation Series to break his own record for the highest score in a T20I match, eclipsing the 156 he set in August 2013. Rohit Sharma and David Miller of South Africa share the record for the fastest century, both reaching the milestone from 35 deliveries. Miller was also the first player to score a T20I century batting at number five or lower.As of March 2019, 41 centuries have been scored by 28 different players over 750 T20I matches. Players from all teams except Ireland and Zimbabwe that are Full Members and of the teams that are Associate Members only Hong Kong, Kuwait, Papua New Guinea, Scotland, Spain and the United Arab Emirates have had a player reach triple figures, New Zealand and India lead the list with seven centuries. Centuries have been scored at 35 different grounds, with Pallekele International Cricket Stadium in Kandy, Sri Lanka, leading the list with three.

Rishabh Pant

Rishabh Rajendra Pant (born 4 October 1997) is a professional Indian cricketer who plays for India, Delhi, and the Delhi Capitals in the Indian Premier League. In December 2015, he was named in India's squad for the 2016 Under-19 Cricket World Cup. On 1 February 2016, during the tournament, he hit an 18-ball fifty, the fastest at this level. He made his Twenty20 International (T20I) debut for India in January 2017, his Test debut in August 2018, and his One Day International (ODI) debut in October 2018. In January 2019, Pant was named the ICC Emerging Player of the Year at the 2018 ICC Awards.

Shoaib Malik

Shoaib Malik (born 1 February 1982) is a Pakistani cricketer and former captain of the Pakistani side from 2007 to 2009. He is an occasional captain of Pakistan national cricket team He made his One-Day International debut in 1999 against the West Indies and his Test debut in 2001 against Bangladesh. On 3 November 2015, he announced his retirement from Test cricket to focus on 2019 Cricket World Cup. On 2 July 2018, he became the first male cricketer to play 100 T20Is.Shoaib Malik has taken over 150 ODI wickets, and has a batting average in the mid 30s in both Test and ODI cricket. His bowling action has come under scrutiny (particularly his doosra) but he has had elbow surgery to correct this. Malik was ranked second, behind teammate Shahid Afridi, in the ICC ODI all-rounder rankings in June 2008. In March 2010, Malik received a one-year ban from international cricket from the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB); the ban was overturned two months later. On 13 September 2017, Malik became the highest run–scorer in T20I for Pakistan. On 1 July 2018, Malik also became the first Asian batsman to score 2,000 runs in T20Is, and third overall and first player to play 100 T20Is in the world.

In August 2018, during the 2018 Caribbean Premier League tournament, he became the fourth batsman to score 8,000 runs in T20s.

Women's Twenty20 International

Women's Twenty20 International (WT20I) is the shortest form of women's international cricket. A women's Twenty20 International is a 20 overs-per-side cricket match played in a maximum of 150 minutes between two of the top 10 ranked countries of the International Cricket Council (ICC) in terms of women's cricket. The first Twenty20 International match was held in August 2004 between England and New Zealand, six months before the first Twenty20 International match was played between two men's teams. The ICC Women's World Twenty20 was first held in 2009.

In April 2018, the ICC granted full Women's Twenty20 International (WT20I) status to all its members. Therefore, all Twenty20 matches played between two international sides after 1 July 2018 will be a full WT20I. A month after the conclusion of the 2018 Women's Twenty20 Asia Cup, which took place in June 2018, the ICC retrospectively gave all the fixtures in the tournament full WT20I status.

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