Turk Edwards

Albert Glen "Turk" Edwards (September 28, 1907 – January 12, 1973) was an American football tackle in the National Football League (NFL). He played his entire career for the Washington Redskins, starting with their first six seasons in Boston, and later became the head coach. Edwards was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1969.

Turk Edwards
Turk Edwards
No. 17
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:September 28, 1907
Mold, Washington
Died:January 12, 1973 (aged 65)
Kirkland, Washington[1]
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:255 lb (116 kg)
Career information
High school:Clarkston (WA)
College:Washington State
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 1940
Games played:86
Touchdowns:2
Head coaching record:16–18–1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

After graduation from high school in 1928 in Clarkston, Washington, Edwards played college football at Washington State College in nearby Pullman from 1929 to 1931. He helped lead the Cougars to a 9–0 record during the 1930 season and an invitation to the Rose Bowl on New Year's Day.[2] Edwards and teammate Mel Hein became the first All-Americans from Washington State.[2]

He was a member of the Alpha Omicron Chapter of Theta Chi fraternity while in college. The nickname "Turk" was given to him by head coach Babe Hollingbery.[1]

Professional career

After finishing college, Edwards received offers from three NFL franchises, the recently created Boston Braves, the New York Giants, and the Portsmouth Spartans.[3] He chose the highest bid: $1,500 for 10 games from the Braves, a team that would later become the Boston Redskins and then move to Washington, D.C. in 1937.[4]

Edwards played for the Braves/Redskins for nine seasons, winning All-NFL honors from major media outlets every year of his career except his last one.[4]

Edwards sustained a career-ending injury during a coin-tossing ceremony prior to a game against the New York Giants in 1940. After calling the coin toss and shaking hands with college teammate Mel Hein (the Giants' captain), Edwards attempted to pivot around to head back to his sideline. However, his cleats caught in the grass and his oft-injured knee gave way, ending his season and ultimately his career.[4]

Edwards was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1969, which he described as "certainly the greatest honor." He was introduced at the ceremony by Mel Hein, who said, "The thing I'll remember most about Turk Edwards is that he was a true sportsman, a true gentleman and still is."[5]

Coaching career

Edwards continued with the Redskins as an assistant coach from 1941 to 1945 and then as the head coach from 1946 to 1948. After 17 consecutive seasons with the Redskins, Edwards retired from professional football.[4]

After football

After retiring from football, Edwards returned to the Pacific Northwest and operated a sporting goods store in Seattle's University District. In 1961, he moved to Kelso, where he spent eleven years working in the Cowlitz County assessor's office.[1]

Death

After a long illness, Edwards died at age 65 at his Kirkland home on January 12, 1973.[1][6][7]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Ex-Cougar star succumbs". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. January 12, 1973. p. 19.
  2. ^ a b "Turk Edwards". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved 2008-06-15.
  3. ^ "Turk Edwards". How Stuff Works. Retrieved 2008-06-15.
  4. ^ a b c d "Turk Edwards' HOF Profile". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2008-06-15.
  5. ^ "Five New Members Join Pro Grid Hall Of Fame". The Tuscaloosa News. Associated Press. September 14, 1969. p. 17. Retrieved October 7, 2016.
  6. ^ "'Turk' Edwards, ex-WSU, Clarkston great, dies". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). January 14, 1973. p. 14.
  7. ^ "Wayback Machine: Hollingbery, Hein, Edwards". Sports Press NW. 2012-11-27. Retrieved 2015-09-28.

External links

1931 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1931 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1931 college football season. The organizations selecting teams in 1934 included the Associated Press (AP), the Newspaper Enterprise Association, and the United Press (UP).

1932 All-Pro Team

The 1932 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1932 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, seven of the eight NFL coaches for the Associated Press (AP), the United Press, and Collyer's Eye (CE).Five players were selected for the first team by all three selectors: Portsmouth Spartans quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; New York Giants end Ray Flaherty; Green Bay Packers tackle Cal Hubbard; and Chicago Bears guard Zuck Carlson.

1933 All-Pro Team

The 1933 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1933 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press, Red Grange for Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB).

1934 All-Pro Team

The 1934 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1934 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB) based on the composite view of the coaches of 10 NFL teams and a half dozen NFL officials, Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were selected as first-team All-Pro players by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Beattie Feathers; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1935 All-Pro Team

The 1935 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1935 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. The following six players were selected to the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Chicago Cardinals end Bill Smith; Chicago Bears end Bill Karr; New York Giants tackle Bill Morgan; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1936 All-Pro Team

The 1936 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1936 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all four selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Boston Redskins halfback Cliff Battles; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and Green Bay Packers guard Lon Evans. Three others were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Boston Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1937 All-Pro Team

The 1937 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1937 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the International News Service (INS), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; Washington Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and Chicago Bears guard George Musso. Three others were named to the first team by four selectors: Washington Redskins Sammy Baugh (NFL, INS, UP, NYDN; selected as a halfback); Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN); and Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN). Three more were selected by three selectors: Washington Redskins halfback Cliff Battles (NFL, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (INS, CE, NYDN); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (NFL, INS, NYDN).

1939 All-Pro Team

The 1939 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1939 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all six selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bill Osmanski; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann.

1940 National Football League All-Star Game (January)

The 1940 National Football League All-star Game was the professional football league's second all-star game. The game pitted the Green Bay Packers, the league's champion for the 1939 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, January 14, 1940, at Gilmore Stadium in Los Angeles, California in front of 18,000 fans. The Packers defeated the all-stars by a score of 16–7. The game was originally scheduled to be played on the previous Sunday, but it was delayed due to rain.The players on the all-star squad were selected by a national poll of fans. Wilbur Crowell was the referee for the game.

1946 NFL season

The 1946 NFL season was the 27th regular season of the National Football League. Before the season, Elmer Layden resigned as NFL Commissioner and Bert Bell, co-founder of the Philadelphia Eagles, replaced him. Meanwhile, the All-America Football Conference was formed to rival the NFL, and the Rams became the first NFL team based on the West Coast after they relocated from Cleveland, Ohio, to Los Angeles, California. A regular season game was played on Tuesday, the last until the 2010 season, on October 1, between New York and Boston.

The season ended when the Chicago Bears defeated the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game.

1947 NFL season

The 1947 NFL season was the 28th regular season of the National Football League. The league expanded the regular season by one game from eleven games per team to twelve, a number that remained constant for fourteen seasons, through 1960.

The season ended when the Chicago Cardinals defeated the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFL Championship Game on December 28.

1948 NFL season

The 1948 NFL season was the 29th regular season of the National Football League. During the season, Halfback Fred Gehrke painted horns on the Los Angeles Rams' helmets, making the first modern helmet emblem in pro football. The last regular season game played on Wednesday until the 2012 season happened on September 22, 1948, between Detroit and Los Angeles.

The season ended when the Philadelphia Eagles defeated the Chicago Cardinals in the NFL Championship Game.

The 1948 season featured the highest per-game, per-team scoring in NFL history, with the average team scoring 23.2 points per game. This record stood for 65 years until 2013.

Albert Edwards

Albert Edwards may refer to:

Al Edwards (born 1937), former member of the Texas Legislature

Al Edwards (American football) (born 1967), American football wide receiver

Albert Edwards (footballer), English footballer

Albert Gallatin Edwards (1812–1892), Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Treasury

Bert Edwards (politician) (Albert Augustine Edwards, 1887–1963), Australian politician

Bert Edwards (footballer) (1915–1995), Australian rules footballer

Turk Edwards (Albert Glen Edwards, 1907–1973), American football tackle

Bill McPeak

William Patrick McPeak (July 24, 1926 – May 7, 1991) was an American football player and National Football League coach.

John Whelchel

John Esten "Billick" Whelchel (April 1, 1898 – November 5, 1973) was a decorated officer in the United States Navy with the rank of Vice Admiral, American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the United States Naval Academy from 1942 to 1943, compiling a record of 13–5. In 1949, he was the head coach for the National Football League's Washington Redskins, tallying a mark of 3–3–1.

List of Washington Redskins head coaches

This is a complete list of Washington Redskins head coaches. There have been 28 head coaches for the Washington Redskins, including coaches for the Boston Redskins (1933–1936) and Boston Braves (1932), of the National Football League (NFL). The Redskins franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.Joe Gibbs is the only coach to have more than one tenure. Two different coaches have won NFL championships with the team: Ray Flaherty in 1937 and 1942, and Joe Gibbs in 1982, 1987 and 1991. Gibbs is the all-time leader in games coached and wins, and Dudley DeGroot leads all coaches in winning percentage with .737 (with at least one full season coached). Mike Nixon is statistically the worst coach the Redskins have had in terms of winning percentage, with .182.Of the 28 Redskins coaches, seven have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including Ray Flaherty, Turk Edwards, Curly Lambeau, Otto Graham, Vince Lombardi, George Allen and Joe Gibbs. Several former players have been head coach for the Redskins, including Turk Edwards, Dick Todd, Jack Pardee and Richie Petitbon.

In addition, former players have become assistant coaches, such as Earnest Byner, Russ Grimm, and Keenan McCardell. On January 5, 2010 the Redskins hired former Denver Broncos and Oakland Raiders coach Mike Shanahan. Shanahan went 24–40 during four seasons in charge, before he was fired on December 30, 2013.

National Football League 1930s All-Decade Team

This is a list of all NFL players who had outstanding performances throughout the 1930s and have been compiled together into this fantasy group. The team was selected by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame retroactively in 1969 to mark the league’s 50th anniversary.

Washington Redskins

The Washington Redskins are a professional American football team based in the Washington metropolitan area. The Redskins compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at FedExField in Landover, Maryland; its headquarters and training facility are at Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Virginia and the Redskins Complex in Richmond, Virginia, respectively.

The Redskins have played more than one thousand games since their founding 87 years ago in 1932, and are one of only five franchises in the NFL to record over six hundred regular season and postseason wins, reaching that mark in 2015. The Redskins have won five NFL Championships (the latter three in Super Bowls), and have captured fourteen divisional titles and six conference championships. It was the first NFL franchise with an official marching band and the first with a fight song, Hail to the Redskins.The team began play in Boston as the Braves in 1932, and became the "Redskins" the following year. In 1937, the team relocated to Washington, D.C. The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 NFL championship games, as well as Super Bowls XVII, XXII, and XXVI. They have been league runner-up six times, losing the 1936, 1940, 1943, and 1945 title games, and Super Bowls VII and XVIII. With 24 postseason appearances, the Redskins have an overall postseason record of 23–18. Their three Super Bowl wins are tied with the Oakland Raiders and Denver Broncos, behind the Pittsburgh Steelers and New England Patriots (six each), San Francisco 49ers and Dallas Cowboys (five each), and the Green Bay Packers and New York Giants (four each).All of the Redskins' league titles were attained during two 10-year spans. From 1936 to 1945, the Redskins went to the NFL Championship six times, winning two of them. The second period lasted between 1982 and 1991 where the Redskins appeared in the postseason seven times, captured four Conference titles, and won three Super Bowls out of four appearances. The Redskins have also experienced failure in their history. The most notable period of general failure was from 1946 to 1970, during which the Redskins posted only four winning seasons and did not have a single postseason appearance. During this period, the Redskins went without a single winning season during the years 1956–1968. In 1961, the franchise posted their worst regular season record with a 1–12–1 showing. Since their last Super Bowl victory following the end of the 1991 season, the Redskins have only won the NFC East three times, made five postseason appearances, and had nine seasons with a winning record.

According to Forbes, the Redskins are the fourth most valuable franchise in the NFL and the tenth most valuable overall in the world as of 2018, valued at approximately US$3.1 billion. They also set the NFL record for single-season attendance in 2007, and have the top ten single-season attendance totals in the NFL. Over the team's history, the name and logo have drawn controversy, with many criticizing it as offensive to Native Americans.

Washington State Cougars football

The Washington State Cougars football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Washington State University, located in the U.S. state of Washington. The team competes at the NCAA Division I level in the FBS and is a member of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). Known as the Cougars, the first football team was fielded in 1894.

The Cougars play home games on campus at Martin Stadium in Pullman, Washington, which opened in 1972; the site dates back to 1892 when it was called Soldier Field. Its present seating capacity is 33,522. Their main rivals are the Washington Huskies. The Cougars and Huskies historically end each regular season with the Apple Cup rivalry game in late November. They are currently coached by Mike Leach.

Turk Edwards—championships, awards, and honors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.