Tuck Stainback

George Tucker Stainback (August 4, 1911 – November 29, 1992)[1] was an American professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 13 seasons with the Chicago Cubs (1934–1937), St. Louis Cardinals (1938), Philadelphia Phillies (1938), Brooklyn Dodgers (1938–1939), Detroit Tigers (1940–1941), New York Yankees (1942–1945), and Philadelphia Athletics (1946).[2]

Tuck Stainback
Outfielder
Born: August 4, 1911
Los Angeles, California
Died: November 29, 1992 (aged 81)
Camarillo, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 17, 1934, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1946, for the Philadelphia Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.259
Home runs17
Runs batted in204
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Playing career

Born in Los Angeles, Stainback played in 817 games, 629 in the outfield. For his career, he had a .259 batting average and 204 RBIs. An unusual statistic from his career was that his career errors (48) outnumbered his home runs and stolen bases combined (44).[3]

Career highlights[4]

  • As a rookie outfielder with the Chicago Cubs in 1934, he batted .306.
  • In the 1935 World Series, Stainback was on the bench for the Chicago Cubs when he began riding umpire George Moriarty, leading to the entire Cubs' dugout being cleared.
  • In April 1938, after four seasons with the Cubs, Stainback was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in a deal for pitcher Dizzy Dean.
  • On May 28, 1938, after being selected off waivers by the Philadelphia Phillies, Stainback single-handedly prevented Carl Hubbell from pitching a perfect game. Stainback was the only Phillies baserunner, as he had both a walk and a single off Hubbell. [1]
  • Traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers on July 30, 1940, Stainback hit .327 in 104 at bats for the Dodgers.
  • Stainback played four seasons for the New York Yankees from 1942 to 1945. He played in seven World Series games for the Yankees in 1942 and 1943, helping the Yankees to win the 1943 World Series.
  • After retiring as a player, Stainback helped organize the first pension system for major league ballplayers in 1947.

Dodger executive career

After the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles in 1958, Stainback, who had settled in the area after retiring from baseball, approached the Dodgers' Red Patterson with his idea to develop ticket sales to fraternal and civic organizations. He developed group ticket sales over a 20-year career as a Dodger executive and supervised the club's Knothole program, which treated children to free games.

Death

Stainback died in 1992 after suffering a stroke in Camarillo, California, at age 81.

References

  1. ^ "Chicago Cubs Tuck Stainback | Busy Beaver Button Museum". www.buttonmuseum.org. Retrieved 2019-04-24.
  2. ^ "Tuck Stainback Stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2019-04-24.
  3. ^ DuPaul, Glenn. "The Top-Ten Worst Players in Baseball History". www.beyondtheboxscore.com. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  4. ^ "Tuck Stainback Minor Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2019-04-24.

Sources

1934 Chicago Cubs season

The 1934 Chicago Cubs season was the 63rd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 59th in the National League and the 19th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 86–65.

1935 Chicago Cubs season

The 1935 Chicago Cubs season was the 64th season for the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 60th in the National League and the 20th at Wrigley Field. The season saw the Cubs finish with 100 wins for the first time in 25 years; they would not win 100 games in another season until 2016. The Cubs won their 14th National League pennant in team history and faced the Detroit Tigers in the World Series, but lost in six games.

The 1935 season is largely remembered for the Cubs' 21-game winning streak. The streak began on September 4 with the Cubs 2.5 games out of first place. They would not lose again until September 28. The streak propelled the Cubs to the National League pennant. The 21-game winning streak tied the franchise and major league record set in 1880 when they were known as the Chicago White Stockings.

1936 Chicago Cubs season

The 1936 Chicago Cubs season was the 65th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 61st in the National League and the 21st at Wrigley Field. The Cubs tied with the St. Louis Cardinals for second in the National League with a record of 87–67.

1937 Chicago Cubs season

The 1937 Chicago Cubs season was the 66th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 62nd in the National League and the 22nd at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished second in the National League with a record of 93–61.

1938 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1938 Brooklyn Dodgers season was their 55th season. The team finished with a record of 69–80, finishing in seventh place in the National League. The 1938 season saw Babe Ruth hired as the first base coach, and lights installed by the team at Ebbets Field on June 15.

1938 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1938 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in eighth place – last in an eight-team National League – with a record of 45–105, 43 games behind the first-place Chicago Cubs and 24.5 games behind the seventh-place Brooklyn Dodgers. It was the first of five straight seasons in which the Phillies finished in last place. The Phillies wore blue and yellow on their uniforms in honor of the Tercentenary of New Sweden.The Phillies moved from their old home park, Baker Bowl, to Shibe Park midway through the season. Phillies president Gerald Nugent was eager to cut expenses and he cited the move as an opportunity for the Phillies to cut expenses by sharing stadium upkeep with the Philadelphia Athletics.

1938 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1938 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 57th season in St. Louis, Missouri, United States, and the 47th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 71–80 during the season and finished 6th in the National League.

1939 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1939 Brooklyn Dodgers started the year with a new manager, Leo Durocher, who became both the team's manager and starting shortstop. They also became the first New York NL team to have a regular radio broadcast, with Red Barber handing the announcers job, and the first team to have a television broadcast (during their August 26 home game doubleheaders against the Reds, both of which WNBT covered for the NBC network). The team finished in third place, showing some improvement over the previous seasons.

1940 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1940 Brooklyn Dodgers finished the season in second place. It was their best finish in 16 years.

1940 Detroit Tigers season

The 1940 Detroit Tigers season was their 40th since they entered the American League in 1901. The team won the American League pennant with a record of 90–64, finishing just one game ahead of the Cleveland Indians and just two games ahead of the New York Yankees. It was the sixth American League pennant for the Tigers. The team went on to lose the 1940 World Series to the Cincinnati Reds 4 games to 3.

1941 Detroit Tigers season

The 1941 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished tied for fourth in the American League with a record of 75–79, 26 games behind the New York Yankees.

1942 New York Yankees season

The 1942 New York Yankees season was the team's 40th season in New York and its 42nd overall. The team finished with a record of 103–51, winning their 13th pennant, finishing 9 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1942 World Series

The 1942 World Series featured the defending champion New York Yankees against the St. Louis Cardinals, with the Cardinals winning the Series in five games for their first championship since 1934 and their fourth overall.

The 1942 Cardinals set a franchise record for victories with 106. Every Cardinal—except for Harry Gumbert—was a product of the team's farm system, which had been put in place by Branch Rickey.

The Yankees won Game 1 despite a Cardinals rally, but the Cardinals swept the rest. The loss was the Yankees' first since the 1926 World Series, also to the Cardinals. They had won eight Series in the interim (a record for most consecutive series won between losses) and had won 32 out of 36 World Series games in that period, including five sweeps (1927 vs. the Pirates, 1928 vs. the Cardinals, 1932 and 1938 vs. the Cubs and 1939 vs. the Reds).

1943 New York Yankees season

The 1943 New York Yankees season was the team's 41st season in New York, and its 43rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 14th pennant, finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Washington Senators. Managed by Joe McCarthy, the Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1944 New York Yankees season

The 1944 New York Yankees season was the team's 42nd season in New York, and its 44th season overall. The team finished in third place in the American League with a record of 83–71, finishing 6 games behind the St. Louis Browns. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1945 New York Yankees season

The 1945 New York Yankees season was the team's 43rd season in New York and its 45th overall. The team finished in fourth place in the American League with a record of 81–71, finishing 6.5 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1946 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1946 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 49 wins and 105 losses.

Stainback

Stainback is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Charles A. Stainback (c. 1879 – 1961), American lawyer and politician

George Tucker Stainback (1829–1902), American classicist and Presbyterian minister

Ingram Stainback (1883–1961), American politician

Tuck Stainback (1911–1992), American baseball player

Tuck (nickname)

Tuck or the Tuck is a nickname of:

William "Tuck" Andress, half of the American jazz duo Tuck & Patti

Everett E. Kelly (1898-1983), American college football player

James McIntyre (footballer) (1863-1943), Scottish footballer

George Tucker Tuck Stainback (1911-1992), American Major League Baseball player

Thomas Syme (1928-2011), British ice hockey player

Trinity Taylor (born 1984), American drag performer nicknamed "the Tuck"

George Tuck Turner (1866-1945), American Major League Baseball player

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