Trembler

Tremblers are a New World group of passerine birds related to mockingbirds and New World catbirds. Like these, they are in the family Mimidae. There are 2-4 species in one genus, Cinclocerthia, which is endemic to the Lesser Antilles:

  • Grey trembler (Martinique trembler), Cinclocerthia (gutturalis) gutturalis
    • Saint Lucia trembler, Cinclocerthia (gutturalis) macrorhyncha
  • (Southern) brown trembler, Cinclocerthia (ruficauda) ruficauda
    • Northern brown trembler, Cinclocerthia (ruficauda) tremula

Among the living birds, they are apparently most closely related to the pearly-eyed thrasher.[1]

Their common name comes from their peculiar behavior: if excited, they will show a much more exaggerated version of the wing-flicking also seen in other mimids such as the northern mockingbirds. The tremblers do not just flick their wings, but shake their entire bodies in a trembling motion.

Tremblers
Cinclocerthia ruficauda - Dominica 2001 - a
Brown trembler (Cinclocerthia ruficauda)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Mimidae
Genus: Cinclocerthia
G.R. Gray, 1840
Species

Cinclocerthia gutturalis
Cinclocerthia ruficauda
(but see text)

Synonyms

Buleites Gistl, 1848
Stenorhynchus Gould, 1838 (non Lamarck, 1818: preoccupied)

Footnotes

  1. ^ Hunt et al. (2001), Barber et al. (2004)

References

Media related to Cinclocerthia at Wikimedia Commons

  • Barber, Brian R.; Martínez-Gómez, Juan E. & Peterson, A. Townsend (2004): Systematic position of the Socorro mockingbird Mimodes graysoni. J. Avian Biol. 35: 195-198. doi:10.1111/j.0908-8857.2004.03233.x (HTML abstract)
  • Hunt, Jeffrey S.; Bermingham, Eldredge; & Ricklefs, Robert E. (2001): Molecular systematics and biogeography of Antillean thrashers, tremblers, and mockingbirds (Aves: Mimidae). Auk 118(1): 35–55. DOI:10.1642/0004-8038(2001)118[0035:MSABOA]2.0.CO;2 HTML fulltext without images
Bees Make Honey

Bees Make Honey were an influential band in the early pub rock movement in the UK.

The band were formed in 1971 in north London by Barry Richardson, who had a residency in a jazz band at the "Tally Ho" pub, when Eggs over Easy started playing pub rock there. He invited Ruan O’Lochlainn, Deke O’Brien and Mick Molloy to see Eggs over Easy and they formed a band with American drummer Bob "Cee" Siebenberg, who would later rise to fame in Supertramp. Richardson, O’Brien and Molloy were former members of Irish showband The Alpine Seven, and of Dublin's first Rhythm & Blues band Bluesville (with Ian Whitcomb). They initially performed as an unnamed band at the "Tally Ho", where Richardson had previously performed, eventually naming themselves Bees Make Honey in January 1972 While touring heavily on the emerging pub rock circuit, Bees Make Honey signed with record label EMI who issued their first single "Knee Trembler" / "Caldonia" (EMI 2078 (1972)), and their debut album Music Every Night (EMI 3013 (1973)). The album was recorded at Rockfield Studios and produced by their manager Dave Robinson, who also managed Brinsley Schwarz, but by the time the album was released, O’Lochlainn and Siebenberg had left. Drummer Fran Byrne, guitarist Rod Demick (ex Screaming Lord Sutch) and keyboardist Malcolm Morley (ex Help Yourself) joined, and toured to promote the album. They supported T. Rex at the Brixton Academy, but most of the audience were teenage girls desperate to see Marc Bolan, and the band was booed heavily. They appeared on BBC2 In Concert in 1973. In 1974 original members O'Brien and Molloy left, and Morley joined Man, so guitarists Willy Finlayson and Ed Deane, and keyboardist Kevin McAlea, joined. This line up recorded the second album, but EMI dropped both the unreleased album and the band. Another album was cut for DJM Records, but when this was also not released, the band broke up in late 1974.After the break-up Byrne moved to Ace, Demick & Finlayson formed Meal Ticket and McAlea went on to work with Kate Bush on her 1979 tour and her series of concerts in 2014 in London.

A 4-track EP ("Sylvie"/"Namalee"/"Boogie Queen"/"Don't Stop Now") entitled Bees Make Honey was released by Charly (CEP 117) in 1977. In November 1996, Bees Make Honey were included along with other notable UK pub rock bands on a two-disc compilation by EMI Naughty Rhythms: The Best of Pub Rock (EMI Premiere 37968). Subsequently, in 2003, label Acadia released a two-disc anthology entitled Back on Track, combining studio sessions and representative live performances by the band.

The Bees also contribute three tracks ("What Have we Got to Loose", "Indian Bayou Saturday" and"Dance Around") and Meal Ticket one ("Day Job") to Goodbye Nashville, Hello Camden Town: A Pub Rock Anthology issued by Castle Records in March 2007 (CMEDD1451).

Brown trembler

The brown trembler (Cinclocerthia ruficauda) is a species of bird in the Mimidae family. Northern birds from Guadeloupe northwards may represent a separate species (C. tremula) from those on Dominica and St. Vincent.

It is found in the Lesser Antilles where it breeds on Saba, St. Kitts, Nevis, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, Dominica and St. Vincent. It formerly occurred on St. Eustatius. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.

Catbird

Several unrelated groups of songbirds are called catbirds because of their wailing calls, which resemble a cat's meowing. The genus name Ailuroedus likewise is from the Greek for "cat-singer" or "cat-voiced".Australasian catbirds are the genera Ailuroedus and the monotypic Scenopooetes. They belong to the bowerbird family (Ptilonorhynchidae) of the basal songbirds:

Ochre-breasted catbird (Ailuroedus stonii)

White-eared catbird (Ailuroedus buccoides)

Tan-capped catbird (Ailuroedus geislerorum)

Green catbird (Ailuroedus crassirostris)

Spotted catbird (Ailuroedus melanotis)

Huon catbird (Ailuroedus astigmaticus)

Black-capped catbird (Ailuroedus melanocephalus)

Black-eared catbird (Ailuroedus melanotis)

Arfak catbird (Ailuroedus arfakianus)

Northern catbird (Ailuroedus jobiensis)

Tooth-billed catbird, Scenopooetes dentirostrisNew World catbirds are two monotypic genera from the mimid family (Mimidae) of the passeridan superfamily Muscicapoidea. Among the Mimidae, they represent independent basal lineages probably closer to the Caribbean thrasher and trembler assemblage than to the mockingbirds and Toxostoma thrashers:

Gray catbird, Dumetella carolinensis

Black catbird, Melanoptila glabrirostrisThe Abyssinian catbird (Parophasma galinieri) represents a monotypic genus from Africa. It is tentatively placed in the Old World babbler family (Timaliidae) of the passeridan superfamily Sylvioidea, but possibly closer to the typical warblers of the Sylviidae.

Duane Eddy

Duane Eddy (born April 26, 1938) is an American guitarist. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, he had a string of hit records produced by Lee Hazlewood which were noted for their characteristically "twangy" sound, including "Rebel Rouser", "Peter Gunn", and "Because They're Young". He had sold 12 million records by 1963.He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994, and the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2008.

Ectopia (album)

Ectopia is an album from Steroid Maximus. It was released on May 28, 2002 by Ipecac Recordings.

Ectopia is Ectopic Entertainment #ECT ENTS 023.

Gray catbird

The gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), also spelled grey catbird, is a medium-sized North American and Central American perching bird of the mimid family. It is the only member of the "catbird" genus Dumetella. Like the black catbird (Melanoptila glabrirostris), it is among the basal lineages of the Mimidae, probably a closer relative of the Caribbean thrasher and trembler assemblage than of the mockingbirds and Toxostoma thrashers. In some areas it is known as the slate-colored mockingbird.

Grey trembler

The grey trembler (Cinclocerthia gutturalis) is a songbird species in the family Mimidae. It is found only in Martinique and Saint Lucia, the Martinique trembler (C. g. gutturalis) on the former island, the Saint Lucia trembler (C. g. macrorhyncha) – which might be a distinct species – on the latter.

In 1898 a unique skin was discovered in the World Museum Liverpool. This specimen was obtained by Edward Smith-Stanley, 13th Earl of Derby from bird collector Jules Verreaux in 1850 and was on display in the Liverpool Museum since then. It was believed to be an extinct starling from the Mascarenes, described by Henry Ogg Forbes under the name Necropsar leguati and sketched by bird illustrator John Gerrard Keulemans. It was supposed to be a close relative of the Rodrigues starling. A vernacular name for this supposed species was "white Mascarene starling".

However, in April 2000 ancient DNA analysis of that skin in the Smithsonian Institution led by Storrs Olson had shown that the Liverpool specimen was nothing more than a misidentified and mislabeled albinistic specimen of C. g. gutturalis.

Ignition system

An ignition system generates a spark or heats an electrode to a high temperature to ignite a fuel-air mixture in spark ignition internal combustion engines, oil-fired and gas-fired boilers, rocket engines, etc. The widest application for spark ignition internal combustion engines is in petrol (gasoline) road vehicles such as cars and motorcycles.

Compression ignition Diesel engines ignite the fuel-air mixture by the heat of compression and do not need a spark. They usually have glowplugs that preheat the combustion chamber to allow starting in cold weather. Other engines may use a flame, or a heated tube, for ignition. While this was common for very early engines it is now rare.

The first electric spark ignition was probably Alessandro Volta's toy electric pistol from the 1780s.

Siegfried Marcus patented his "Electrical igniting device for gas engines" on 7 October 1884.

Laurence de Cambronne

Laurence de Cambronne (born 1 May 1951, Casablanca, Morocco) is a French journalist, novelist and humanitarian.

Lesser electric ray

The lesser electric ray (Narcine bancroftii), also known as the Brazilian electric ray, small electric ray, spotted torpedo ray, torpedofish or trembler, is a species of numbfish in the family Narcinidae found on the western coastal fringes of the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. It is a small slow-moving fish, living in the surf zone of sandy or muddy beaches. Here it is easily caught as bycatch by shrimp fisheries and seine netters. As a result, its numbers have declined rapidly and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has rated it as being "critically endangered".

List of endemic birds of the West Indies

This article is one of a series providing information about endemism among birds in the world's various zoogeographic zones. For an overview of this subject see Endemism in birds.

Pantites

Pantites (died c. 470s BC) was a Spartan warrior, one of the Three Hundred sent to the Battle of Thermopylae. King Leonidas I ordered Pantites on an embassy to Thessaly, possibly to recruit allies for the coming battle. However, Pantites failed to return to Thermopylae in time for the battle, arriving after all of his fellow soldiers had been killed. When he returned to Sparta, he was shunned as a "trembler" and made an outcast. Unable to live with his disgrace, he hanged himself.

Rolls-Royce 15 hp

The Rolls-Royce 15 hp was one of four cars to be produced as a result of an agreement of 23 December 1904 between Charles Rolls and Henry Royce. Badged as a Rolls-Royce, the 15 hp was produced by Royce's company, Royce Ltd., at its factory in Cooke Street, Hulme, Manchester. It was sold exclusively by Rolls' motor dealership, C.S.Rolls & Co., at a price of GBP500. The 15 hp was exhibited at the Paris Salon in December 1904, along with the 10 hp, 20 hp and engine for the 30 hp models, but as the new three-cylinder engine was not ready the chassis was incomplete.

Three-cylinder engines were quite popular in the early years of motoring, and one was part of the ambitious programme of the new company. The layout produced less vibration than 2-cylinder engines and was much simpler to make than a six-cylinder with its long crankshaft. However, Royce was making his range of engines using a standard two-cylinder block, putting two together for the four-cylinder and three for the six. The three-cylinder engine did not fit in with this production, having each of its cylinders cast separately, and this is thought to be the reason why only six were made. The engine, which has a bore of 4 in (102 mm) and stroke of 5 in (127 mm), is water-cooled and of 3000 cc capacity with overhead inlet and side exhaust valves. A high-tension ignition system using pre-charged accumulators, a trembler and a coil provides the ignition spark. As the lighting supplied uses oil, there is no other drain on the accumulators. The power output is 15 bhp (11 kW) at 1000 rpm. The engine speed is controlled by a governor that can be over-ridden by the pedal controlled accelerator. A three-speed gearbox is used, connected to the engine via a short shaft and a leather cone clutch is used.

The car has a top speed of 39 mph (63 km/h). There is a transmission brake fitted behind the gearbox operated by foot pedal and internal expanding drum brakes on the back axle operated by the handbrake lever. Springing is by semi-elliptic leaf springs on both front and rear axles with an additional crossways helper spring on the rear of some of the cars. Artillery type wheels were fitted.

Rolls-Royce did not provide the coachwork. Instead, the cars were sold in chassis form for the customer to arrange his own body supplier, with Barker recommended.

Only one car, registered SD 661, is known to survive.

Rolls-Royce 20 hp (1905)

The Rolls-Royce 20 hp was one of four car models to be produced as a result of an agreement of 23 December 1904 between Charles Rolls and Henry Royce. Badged as a Rolls-Royce, the 20 hp was produced during 1905 and 1906 by Royce's company, Royce Ltd. at its factory in Cooke Street, Hulme, Manchester. It was sold exclusively by Rolls' motor dealership, C.S.Rolls & Co., at a price of GBP650. The 20 hp was exhibited at the Paris Salon in December 1904, along with the 10 hp, 15 hp and engine for the 30 hp models.

The engine was made of two separately cast two-cylinder units which were common with the two-cylinder 10 hp and six-cylinder 30 hp types sharing their bore of 4 in (102 mm) and stroke of 5 in (127 mm). It is water-cooled and of 4118 cc capacity with overhead inlet and side exhaust valves Early cars had a high-tension ignition system using pre-charged accumulators, a trembler and a coil ignition system; on later cars this was supplemented by a magneto which could be used as an alternative. As the lighting supplied uses oil for the side and tail and acetylene for the headlights, there is no other drain on the accumulators, which need to be recharged between outings. The power output is 20 bhp (15 kW) at 1000 rpm. The engine speed is controlled by a governor that can be over-ridden by the pedal-controlled accelerator. A three-speed gearbox was fitted at first, later changed to four-speed with the introduction of the Light 20 and subsequently fitted to all cars, connected to the engine via a short shaft and a leather-lined cone clutch was used. On the four-speed type, third gear is direct and fourth speed an overdrive ratio.

Two of the cars ran in the 1905 Isle of Man TT race and one driven by Percy Northey came second overall, the other driven by C.S. Rolls failed to finish after gearbox problems. Rolls tried again in 1906 and won. In December 1906 he took a car to the United States and won a race at Yonkers.The first cars had a chassis length of 114 in (2,896 mm) but following the special lightweight cars made for the TT Race a shorter 106 in (2,692 mm) version became available. These would become known as the Heavy 20 and Light 20. The track on the Light 20 was also narrower at 52 in (1,321 mm) compared with the Heavy 20's 56 in (1,422 mm). Rolls-Royce did not provide the coachwork. Instead, the cars were sold in chassis form for the customer to arrange his own body supplier. Both closed and open cars were made.

The Light 20 has a top speed of 50 mph (80 km/h) (52 mph (84 km/h) on the TT versions) and the Heavy 20 47 mph (76 km/h). This speed would be reduced if a heavy body was fitted. There is a transmission brake operating on a drum fitted behind the gearbox operated by foot pedal and internal expanding drum brakes on the back axle operated by the handbrake lever. Suspension is by semi-elliptic leaf springs on both front and rear axles with an additional crossways helper spring on the rear. Artillery type wheels with wooden spokes were fitted.

Forty chassis were produced between 1905 and 1906. Three cars, chassis numbers 26350, 40509 and 40520 are known to survive.

Sally Lockhart

Veronica Beatrice "Sally" Lockhart (Later Goldberg) Is a fictional character in a series of books by Philip Pullman.

The Collected Works of Tourniquet

The Collected Works of Tourniquet is an album by the American Christian metal band Tourniquet. It is a compilation album that features the two new songs "Perfect Night For A Hanging" and "The Hand Trembler." In addition, "The Skeezix Dilemma" is an edited version, using the bulk of the studio recording from Pathogenic Ocular Dissonance segued into the song's live ending from Intense Live Series, Vol. 2.

Trembler coil

A trembler coil or vibrator coil is a type of high-voltage ignition coil used in the ignition system of early automobiles, most notably the Benz Patent-Motorwagen and the Ford Model T. Its distinguishing feature is a vibrating magnetically-activated contact called a trembler or interrupter, which breaks the primary current, generating multiple sparks during each cylinder's power stroke. Trembler coils were first used on the 1886 Benz automobile, and were used on the Model T until 1927.

Tremella mesenterica

Tremella mesenterica (common names include yellow brain, golden jelly fungus, yellow trembler, and witches' butter) is a common jelly fungus in the Tremellaceae family of the Agaricomycotina. It is most frequently found on dead but attached and on recently fallen branches, especially of angiosperms, as a parasite of wood decay fungi in the genus Peniophora. The gelatinous, orange-yellow fruit body of the fungus, which can grow up to 7.5 cm (3.0 in) diameter, has a convoluted or lobed surface that is greasy or slimy when damp. It grows in crevices in bark, appearing during rainy weather. Within a few days after rain it dries into a thin film or shriveled mass capable of reviving after subsequent rain. This fungus occurs widely in deciduous and mixed forests and is widely distributed in temperate and tropical regions that include Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North and South America. Although considered bland and flavorless, the fungus is edible. Tremella mesenterica produces carbohydrates that are attracting research interest because of their various biological activities.

USS Quillback (SS-424)

USS Quillback (SS-424), a Tench-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for quillback, a fish of the sucker family, widespread in the freshwaters of North America and Northern Asia.

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