Tourist attraction

A tourist attraction is a place of interest where tourists visit, typically for its inherent or an exhibited natural or cultural value, historical significance, natural or built beauty, offering leisure and amusement.

Taj Mahal (Edited).jpeg
The Taj Mahal in Agra, India, a popular tourist attraction. More than 7-8 million visit the Taj Mahal each year.
Paris 06 Eiffelturm 4828
The Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, a popular tourist attraction. Almost 7 million visit the tower each year.
Cristo Rei (36211699613)
The Christ the King statue in Almada, Portugal, became a popular tourist attraction.

Types

Bali religiös ceremoni på strand med turister
Tropical beaches and Balinese culture are attractions that draw tourists to this popular island resort, such as Melasti rituals performed on the beach.

Places of natural beauty such as beaches, tropical island resorts, national parks, mountains, deserts and forests, are examples of traditional tourist attractions which people may visit. Cultural tourist attractions can include historical places, monuments, ancient temples, zoos, aquaria, museums and art galleries, botanical gardens, buildings and structures (such as forts, castles, libraries, former prisons, skyscrapers, bridges), theme parks and carnivals, living history museums, public art (sculptures, statues, murals), signs, ethnic enclave communities, historic trains and cultural events. Factory tours, industrial heritage, creative art and crafts workshops are the object of cultural niches like industrial tourism and creative tourism. Many tourist attractions are also landmarks.

Tourist attractions are also created to capitalise on legends such as a supposed UFO crash site near Roswell, New Mexico and the alleged Loch Ness monster sightings in Scotland. Ghost sightings also make tourist attractions.

Ethnic communities may become tourist attractions, such as Chinatowns in the United States and the black British neighbourhood of Brixton in London, England.

In the United States, owners and marketers of attractions advertise tourist attractions on billboards along the sides of highways and roadways, especially in remote areas. Tourist attractions often provide fast food restaurants, hotel and motel rooms or lobbies, and rest areas, and free promotional brochures and flyers in information centres.

While some tourist attractions provide visitors a memorable experience for a reasonable admission charge or even for free, others may be of low quality and overprice their goods and services (such as admission, food, and souvenirs) in order to profit excessively from tourists. Such places are commonly known as tourist traps.

Within cities, rides on boats and sightseeing buses are sometimes popular.

Novelty attractions

Novelty attractions are oddities such as the "biggest ball of twine" in Cawker City, Kansas, the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota, or Carhenge in Alliance, Nebraska, where old cars serve in the place of stones in a replica of Stonehenge. Novelty attractions are not limited to the American Midwest, but are part of Midwestern culture.[1]

Tourist destination

A tourist destination is a city, town, or other area that is dependent to a significant extent on revenues from tourism, or "a country, state, region, city, or town which is marketed or markets itself as a place for tourists to visit".[2] It may contain one or more tourist attractions and possibly some "tourist traps". Fátima town, for example, is a popular tourist destination in Portugal. Siem Reap town is a popular tourist destination in Cambodia, mainly owing to its proximity to the Angkor temples. The Loire valley, the third tourist destination in France, is a good example of a region marketed and branded as a place for tourists to visit, mainly known for its Châteaux of the Loire valley.

A tropical island resort is an island or archipelago that depends on tourism as its source of revenue. The Bahamas in the Caribbean, Bali in Indonesia, Phuket in Thailand, Hawaii in the United States, Palawan in the Philippines, Fiji in the Pacific, and Santorini and Ibiza in the Mediterranean are examples of popular island resorts.

France, the United States, and Spain were the three most popular international destinations in 2017. The total number of international travelers arriving in those countries was about 234 million,[3] contributing 8.9%, 7.7%, and 14.9%, respectively, to the total GDP of those countries.[4]

From the tourism industry supply perspective a destination is usually defined by a geo-political boundary, and destination marketing is most commonly funded by governments. From the traveler perspective, a destination might be perceived quite differently.[5][6][7]

Economic impact

The tourism industry generates substantial economic benefits for both host countries and tourists' home countries. Especially in developing countries, one of the primary motivations for a region to promote itself as a tourism destination is the expected economic benefit. According to the World Tourism Organization, 698 million people travelled to a foreign country in 2000, spending more than US$478 billion. International tourism receipts combined with passenger transport currently total more than US$575 billion – making tourism the world's number one export earner, ahead of automotive products, chemicals, petroleum and food.[8]

Tourist attractions can:

  • Contribute to government revenues; direct contributions are generated by taxes on incomes from tourism employment and tourism businesses, and by direct levies on tourists, such as departure taxes
  • Provide employment
  • Support conservation of habitats, species and historic sites
  • Stimulate infrastructure investment
  • Contribute to local economies
  • Provide foreign exchange earnings

Examples

Some examples of tourist attractions are:

  • Forests, national parks and reserves of flora and fauna
  • Communities of different ethnicities
  • Constructions and structures (old prisons, libraries, castles, bridges, skyscrapers) and historical places
  • Cultural and sports events
  • Public art
  • Art galleries and museums
  • Botanical gardens and zoos
  • Monuments
  • Theme parks
  • Historical trains and ships
  • Viewpoints

See also

References

  1. ^ "A Golden Gate Fantasy on the Kansas Prairie" article by A.G. Suleberger in The New York Times September 15, 2010, accessed September 16, 2010
  2. ^ Beirman, David (2003). Restoring Tourism Destinations in Crisis: A Strategic Marketing Approach. CABI Publishing. ISBN 9781865089119.
  3. ^ "10 Most Visited Countries In The World". WorldAtlas. 2018-01-25. Retrieved 2018-05-01.
  4. ^ "Contribution of travel and tourism to GDP (% of GDP) by countries, 2017 - knoema.com". Knoema. Retrieved 2018-05-01.
  5. ^ Pike, Steven; Page, Stephen (2014). "Destination marketing organizations and destination marketing: A narrative analysis of the literature". Tourism Management. 41: 202–207. doi:10.1016/j.tourman.2013.09.009. hdl:2299/20103.
  6. ^ Saraniemi, S; Kylanen, M (2011). "Problemizing the concept of tourist destination: An analysis of different theoretical approaches". Journal of Travel Research. 50 (2): 133.
  7. ^ Pike, Steven (2016). Destination Marketing Essentials (Second ed.). Oxford: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-138-91290-8.
  8. ^ "Economic impact of tourism". 2012-07-12.

External links

Ceresole Reale

Ceresole Reale is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 kilometres (31 mi) northwest of Turin in the Orco Valley, on the border with France.

Ceresole Reale borders the following municipalities: Bonneval-sur-Arc (France), Groscavallo, Noasca, Rhêmes-Notre-Dame, Val-d'Isère (France), and Valsavarenche. The communal territory is home to the Gran Paradiso National Park visitors center. The main structure is the large dam, built in 1925–31 by A.E.M. (Turin's electrical authority): this formed the Lago di Ceresole (lake of Ceresole), which is now the town's main tourist attraction.

Ceresole was the location of the ending cliffhanger scene in the 1969 film The Italian Job.

Choron ki Baoli

The Shahjahan ki baoli, more commonly known as the Choron ki baoli, is a baoli in Maham, Haryana, India. The structure, which was built during the reign of Emperor Shah Jahan, collects and holds rainwater for use by the nearby town of Maham. While no longer in mainstay use, the baoli has been persevered as a tourist attraction.

Fort Lauderdale Swap Shop

The Fort Lauderdale Swap Shop is a 14-screen drive-in theater in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America, that doubles as the largest drive-in and largest daily flea market in the world (local broadcast advertising states it to be "Florida's second-biggest tourist attraction"). The largest tourist attraction is supposedly Walt Disney World. From 1989-2006 the Hanneford Family Circus had been performing daily (except Tuesdays) in the Swap Shop food court, entertaining the roughly 12 million people who visit each year.

Jianshi, Hsinchu

Jianshi Township (Chinese: 尖石鄉; pinyin: Jiānshí Xiāng) is a mountain indigenous township in Hsinchu County in northern Taiwan. It had an estimated population of 9,420 as of January 2017. The main population is the indigenous Atayal people.

Ka-Do-Ha Indian Village

Ka-Do-Ha Indian Village is a tourist attraction near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. The site may be a Late Caddo settlement, but has never been professionally excavated.

List of lakes of Taiwan

Taiwan's largest natural lake is Sun Moon Lake. Its largest artificial body of water is in the Zengwen Dam. The majority of Taiwan's lakes have multiple functions such as irrigation, electricity generation, water supply and tourist attractions. The volume area of natural lakes tend not to be big.

Nevşehir Province

Nevşehir Province (Turkish: Nevşehir ili) is a province in central Turkey with its capital in Nevşehir. Its adjacent provinces are Kırşehir to the northwest, Aksaray to the southwest, Niğde to the south, Kayseri to the southeast, and Yozgat to the northeast. Nevşehir includes the area called Cappadocia - a very popular tourist attraction in Turkey. The famous town of Göreme is also located in Nevşehir.

Cappadocia once included the area now covered by this province. This province is notable for the fairy chimneys of Göreme, the Ortahisar (middle fortress), a number of old churches from the Byzantine period.

Pekan Nanas

Pekan Nanas or Pineapple Town is a town located in Pontian District, Johor, Malaysia. Pekan Nanas has a population of approximately 10,000. It contains the Pekan Nanas Immigration Depot and a pineapple canning facility. Pekan Nanas was Malaysia's largest production base for pineapple planting area and output ranked first in the country. Pekan Nanas is also near the Gunung Pulai waterfall, a local tourist attraction.

Shanti Stupa

Shanti Stupa is a Buddhist white-domed stupa (chorten) on a hilltop in Chanspa, Leh district, Ladakh, in the north Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. It was built in 1991 by Japanese Buddhist Bhikshu, Gyomyo Nakamura and part of the Peace Pagoda mission. The Shanti Stupa holds the relics of the Buddha at its base, enshrined by the 14th Dalai Lama. The stupa has become a tourist attraction not only due to its religious significance but also due to its location which provides panoramic views of the surrounding landscape.

Siloah, Jamaica

Siloah is a settlement in Jamaica whose existence dates to between the mid 1700s and the early 1800s. It has a population of 2,653 as of 2009. Siloah's economy revolves around the tourist attraction Appleton Sugar Estate, established in 1749, which produces sugar and rum. Their primary school was started in 1825 and the Black River, one of Jamaica's longest rivers runs through the Appleton property. Siloah is also home to West Indies wicket keeper Chadwick Walton.

Sonbhadra district

Sonbhadra or Sonebhadra is the second largest district of Uttar Pradesh, India. Sonbhadra is the only district in India which borders four states namely Madhya Pradesh, Chhattishgarh Jharkhand and Bihar. The district has an area of 6788 km² and a population of 1,862,559 (2011 census), with a population density of 270 persons per km².It lies in the extreme southeast of the state, and is bounded by Mirzapur District to the northwest, Chandauli District to the north, Kaimur and Rohtas districts of Bihar state to the northeast, Garhwa district of Jharkhand state to the east, Balrampur District of Chhattisgarh state to the south, and Singrauli district of Madhya Pradesh state to the west.

The district headquarters is in the town of Robertsganj.Sonbhadra

district is an industrial zone and it has lots of minerals like bauxite, limestone, coal, gold etc.

Sonbhadra is called as "Energy Capital of India" because there are so many power plants.

Sonbhadra lies between vindhya and Kaimur hills, and its topology and natural environment prompted First Prime minister of India Pt. Jawarharlal Nehru to refer to Sonbhadra as The Switzerland of India.

In 2017 Uttar Pradesh's chief minister Yogi Adityanath gives recognition to "Sonbhadra" as a tourist attraction hub in Purvanchal region and further promoted by Uttar Pradesh Tourism Dept.

Tanjung Harapan

Tanjung Harapan is a notable tourist attraction in Selangor. It is located near the Northport in Port Klang.

Tourism in Burundi

Tourism in Burundi refers to tourism in Burundi. Bujumbura, the largest city and former capital of Burundi, is a major tourist attraction of the country. In addition to this, Lake Tanganyika is a popular tourist attraction.

Tourist Attraction (The Outer Limits)

"Tourist Attraction" is an episode of the original The Outer Limits television show. It first aired on 23 December 1963, during the first season.

Tourist Attraction Rating Categories of China

Tourist Attraction Rating Categories of China (Chinese: 旅游景区质量等级) is a rating system used by the Chinese authorities to determine the quality of the attraction relative to its peers in terms of safety, cleanliness, sanitation and transportation. It is broken up into five categories which are A (or 1A, the lowest level), AA (2A), AAA (3A), AAAA (4A) and AAAAA (5A, the highest level).

Tourist gateway

A tourist gateway (sometimes called a "Tourism Gateway" or "Gateway City") is a place or settlement through which tourists typically first visit on their way to a tourist attraction or tourism region.

Tourist gateways may not offer significant attractions themselves. Although the term suggests that they must be passed through en route, a gateway may not be the only way to reach the tourist destination. They may be the last, largest or only settlement en route to the tourist attraction or in a tourism region, the closest in proximity to, or the first encountered within a tourism region. As such, tourist gateways are often associated with a major international or domestic airport, major road, railway station or seaport.Sometimes the terms are used in the context of information, such as websites that tourist visit in order to find out more about attractions and regions.

Tourist gateways, unlike tourist destinations, may have developed a niche in their economy for the role or may have degrees of dependency on the tourist attraction or region for economic development. As such the focus of their tourism promotion is on their role in the provision of related services, such as transport, accommodation and hospitality. Sometimes these services can be in direct competition with those offered at the tourist attractions themselves.

Tourist gateways may also be associated with roadside attractions and tourist traps.

Often, tourist gateways are associated with a moniker such as "Gateway to the ..."; for example, Gateway to the West.

Treherne, Manitoba

Treherne is an unincorporated urban community in the Municipality of Norfolk Treherne within the Canadian province of Manitoba that held town status prior to January 1, 2015. It is located halfway between Winnipeg and Brandon on Provincial Highway 2. Primarily a farming community, Treherne has a population of around 1750 people, and has two schools (Treherne Elementary School and Treherne Collegiate Institute) and a hospital.

Recently, a brand new daycare facility was opened in the community, and in 2006 Treherne proudly opened the Treherne Aquatic Centre next to a top-rated campground facility.

Treherne hosts the annual "Run for the Hills" marathon each fall with the course winding through the Tiger Hills. A popular tourist attraction in Treherne consists of a glass bottle house, chapel, wishing well, and outhouse, built by local residents Bob Cain and Fred Harp. Treherne also has a museum, which exhibits an extensive antique gun collection and a mini indoor village.

West Lyn River

The West Lyn is a river in England which rises high in Exmoor, Somerset, and joins the East Lyn at Lynmouth in Devon.

The upper reaches have been designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, because of the geomorphological landforms created in the 1952 flood.The lower reaches of the river towards Lynmouth, known as the Glen Lyn Gorge, is a tourist attraction including a museum about the local water cycle, the floods of 1952, and a small hydroelectric plant.

Water is piped from the river to generate hydroelectric power for the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway, which is a water-balance funicular railway.

Yak polo

Yak polo (or sarlagan polo) is a Mongolian variant of the sport polo. It is played on yaks instead of on horseback.

Originally invented in the early 2000s as a tourist attraction, the sport is as of 2006 reported to have attracted a modest following in Mongolia. The Mongolian Association of Sarlagan Polo claims that the sport is booming, with four games a week being played in the summer of 2006.

In Pakistan, Yak polo is played in the Himalayas and Hindukush at Boroghil in District Chitral. The event is held in July every year and is sponsored by the Sarhad Tourism Corporation, Government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

Types
Hospitality
industry
Terminology
Travel literature
Industry organizations,
rankings and events
fairs and events
International Tourism agencies
Destination marketing organizations
Lists

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.