Touch rugby

Touch rugby refers to games derived from rugby football in which players do not tackle each other but instead touch their opponents using their hands on any part of the body, clothing, or the ball.

A formal, competitive variety, known as Touch, developed from rugby league and now exists as a sport in its own right. In addition, touch rugby games are played as training activities for rugby league and rugby union; as safer variants of rugby, particularly in schools and junior clubs, and as an informal social sport.

TouchRugbyBedfordRiverFestival
Touch rugby being played at the 2012 Bedford River Festival.

Features

Touch rugby has a number of differences from the traditional games, including its simplicity (it requires very little equipment or goalposts), its ease of learning and the decreased likelihood of injury. As a result, it is a popular social game; mixed-gender and women-only games are also very popular in the UK where Touch Rugby is played in many popular centres around England and Scotland. Touch Rugby League is a growing competition in Brisbane, Australia.[1] Touch rugby is also gaining popularity in the United States. The USA Touch association hosts an annual national championship. It is known as "Touch" in many parts of the world.

Beach touch is also popular. Social touch games in South Africa and is played barefoot, while 1-touch or six down is played with cleats that have no more than 10 studs on each foot.

Rule variations

The most popular, codified form of touch rugby is derived from rugby league and features two teams of six players. Played under the auspices of the Federation of International Touch (FIT), it is officially known as Touch, and is also called touch football, particularly in Australia, and sometimes 'six down' or 'sixes' in South Africa. FIT rules have become the most common rules used both in FIT-sanctioned competitions and informal games of touch rugby. A version of the FIT rules known as one touch in South Africa features a change of possession after a single touch rather than the six in the league-derived game.

League tag is a semi-contact version of rugby league. It was used initially as a coaching aid to get players new to rugby league in Ireland used to the play-the-ball, retreating to an onside line, and upperbody tackling that stops the ball being passed in the tackle. It was formally codified in 2008 at University College Cork, it allows ball carriers to hold off defenders, and defenders to grab the ball carrier in their bid to touch the ball. Touching the ball effects a tackle

Other versions of touch rugby are not fully codified. For example, as an activity for fitness and skills training, and to reduce the risk of injury, rugby players will sometimes play touch rugby based on modified rugby rules. One common variation is that a fair touch must be below the waist, or, with two hands, or, to encourage rucking, a small non-contact ruck may be formed when a player is "touched". The "touched" player must fall to the ground as he would if he were tackled, and then two players from the attacking team must "ruck" over him within three seconds to keep possession of the ball. A scrum-half then recovers the ball, and play continues.

Touch rugby is often played informally, rather like a pick-up soccer or basketball game. In addition to tackles being replaced by touches, the rules of both rugby codes are simplified, removing elements such as scrums, rucks, mauls, line-outs and kicks.

In the United States, Touch Rugby is usually played following pre-1967 rugby league rules, minus kicking. Players being touched with two hands must place the ball down or play the ball at the spot of the "tackle," and the defensive team must retreat 5 yards or meters. There is often no tackle count, meaning that almost the only way that the defence can obtain the ball is through offensive mistakes. Whenever an offensive infraction occurs (ball into touch, knock-on, or forward pass), the defence receives a tap-kick at the spot of the infraction. Teams switch sides after each try is scored, and the team scoring the try kicks off from the half point.

Until 2003/2004 the English RFU in its junior development program called The Three Stages of the Rugby Continuum encouraged the playing of Non-contact/touch rugby in its under-eights competition, although now promotes Mini Tag instead.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,25316571-5014143,00.html

External links

National Associations

Aimee Barrett-Theron

Aimee Patricia Barrett-Theron (born 27 June 1987) is a former South African rugby union player, and currently a referee on South Africa's Premier Panel. She could play as a fullback, centre or fly-half and played in various forms of the game – 15-a-side rugby union, rugby sevens and touch rugby. Aside from rugby union, she works as a biokineticist.

Amy Williams (rugby union)

Amy Williams (born December 15, 1986) is a female rugby union player. She represented New Zealand and Hawke's Bay. She was in the squad that won the 2006 Women's Rugby World Cup.In 2004 Williams played touch rugby for New Zealand's under 19 team.

Bishop's Stortford RFC

Bishop's Stortford is an English rugby union team based in Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire. The club runs five senior mens sides, a ladies team, O2 Touch rugby section and the full range of mini and junior teams, from under-6's to under-18's. The first XV were promoted to the third tier of the English rugby union system, National League 1 for the first time in season 2017–18.

Cook Islands at the 2015 Pacific Games

The Cook Islands competed at the 2015 Pacific Games in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea from 4 to 18 July 2015. A total of 132 competitors for the Cook Islands were listed as of 4 July 2015.

Evania Pelite

Evania Pelite (born 12 July 1995) is an Australian rugby union and touch rugby player. She won a gold medal at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio.

Pelite made her debut for the Australian women's national rugby sevens team at the age of 17 at the 2013 Amsterdam Women's Sevens. She also represented Australia in touch rugby.Pelite was selected to represent Australia in rugby sevens at the 2016 Summer Olympics. She was a member of Australia's team at the 2016 Olympics, defeating New Zealand in the final to win the inaugural Olympic gold medal in the sport.

Federation of International Touch

The Federation of International Touch (FIT) is the worldwide governing body for Touch football.

The Federation of International Touch was formed at a meeting held in conjunction with the Australian National championships that were held in Melbourne in 1985.

Kiribati at the 2015 Pacific Games

Kiribati competed at the 2015 Pacific Games in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea from 4 to 18 July 2015. A total of 86 competitors for Kiribati were listed as of 4 July 2015.

List of types of football

This is a list of various types of football, most variations found as gridiron, rugby, association football.

Papua New Guinea at the 2015 Pacific Games

Papua New Guinea competed as the host nation at the 2015 Pacific Games in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea from 4 to 18 July 2015. Team PNG listed 625 competitors across all 28 disciplines as of 4 July 2015.

Saddleworth Rangers

Saddleworth Rangers are an amateur Rugby League side, formed in 1930, based at Shaw Hall Bank Road, Greenfield, Greater Manchester in the Saddleworth district of Oldham. The club has teams at a number of levels from junior to the first team, which competes in the National Conference League Division One. In 1993 they won the National Conference League Premier Division..

The club's ground, which has hosted Rugby League for over 60 years, features a small covered stand and a new clubhouse which was opened in 2016, fundraising included a world record attempt at a continuous game of touch rugby.. The Clubhouse was named in honour of stalwart Terry Flanagan MBE, in a ceremony attented by the then Rugby League Chief Executive Nigel Woods and Chief Operating Office Ralph Rimmer.

At almost 160m above sea level, the ground is one of the highest in Rugby League.

Samoa at the 2015 Pacific Games

Samoa competed at the 2015 Pacific Games in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea from 4 to 18 July 2015. Samoa listed 405 competitors as of 4 July 2015. Eight competitors were qualified in two sports.

Southerners Sports Club

The Southerners Sports Club is an informal, non-commercial Bangkok-based club of expats and Thais. The Southerners field teams in Bangkok's local rugby, netball, touch rugby (men's, women's and mixed) and cricket competitions, and also tour to neighbouring countries for regional-based sports tournaments.

The club aims to provide a relaxed atmosphere in both sporting and social contexts.

Touch (rugby)

Touch is the area outside two touch-lines which define the sides of the playing area in a game of rugby football. As the touch-lines are not part of the playing area they are usually included as part of touch.

When a ball is "kicked into touch", it means that it has been kicked out of the playing area into the touch area. In American sports usage, the phrase "out of bounds" signifies the same as "touch."

Touch (sport)

Touch (also known as Touch Football or Touch Rugby) is a variant of rugby league that is organised by the Federation of International Touch (FIT).

Touch is a variation of rugby league with the tackling of opposing players replaced by a touch. As touches must be made with minimal force, touch is therefore a limited-contact sport. The basic rules of touch were established in the 1960s by the South Sydney Junior Rugby League Club.Distinctive features of touch football include the ease of learning it, minimal equipment requirements and the ability to play it without fear of major injury. While it is generally played with two teams of six on-field players, some social competitions allow different number of players per team on the field. It is played by both sexes, and in age divisions from primary school children to over-50s. The mixed version of the game (where both male and female players are on the field at the same time) is particularly popular with social players, and it is widely played in schools. There are other versions of Touch that informally are organised.

Touch rugby at the 2015 Pacific Games

Touch rugby at the 2015 Pacific Games in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea was held on July 3–10, 2015. Papua New Guinea defeated Samoa in the finals of both the men's and women's tournament by 8–7 and 6–2, respectively to claim two of the three gold medals for touch rugby. Samoa turned the tables to claim the gold medal in the mixed tournament, defeating Papua New Guinea by 9–7 in the final. The Cook Islands won all three bronze medals.

Touch rugby at the 2015 Pacific Games – Men's tournament

The Men's touch rugby tournament at the 2015 Pacific Games was held in Port Moresby from 3 to 7 July 2015 at the Bisini Touch Football Fields. The hosts Papua New Guinea won the gold mdeal defeating Samoa by 8–7 in the final. The Cook Islands took the bronze medal defeating the Solomon Islands by 18–4 in the third place play-off.

Touch rugby at the 2015 Pacific Games – Mixed tournament

The Mixed touch rugby tournament at the 2015 Pacific Games was held in Port Moresby from 8 to 10 July 2015 at the Bisini Touch Football Fields. Samoa won the gold medal, defeating hosts Papua New Guinea by 9–7 in the final. Tonga took the bronze medal defeating the Cook Islands by 10–3 in the third place play-off.

Touch rugby at the 2015 Pacific Games – Women's tournament

The Women's touch rugby tournament at the 2015 Pacific Games was held in Port Moresby from 3 to 7 July 2015 at the Bisini Touch Football Fields. The hosts Papua New Guinea won the gold mdeal defeating Samoa by 6–2 in the final. The Cook Islands took the bronze medal defeating Kiribati by 11–2 in the third place play-off.

Touch rugby at the Pacific Games

Touch rugby was introduced to the Pacific Games in 2003 at Suva in Fiji. It is an optional sport for the Pacific Games program, and the tournaments include men's, women's and mixed competitions. The first touch rugby tournament at the Pacific Mini Games was played in the Cook Islands in 2009.

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