Total offense

Total offense (or total offence) is an American football and Canadian football statistic representing the total number of yards rushing and yards passing by a team[1] or player.[2] Total offense differs from yards from scrimmage, which gives credit for passing yardage to the person receiving the football rather than the person throwing the football.

In the game of football, progress is measured by advancing the football towards the opposing team's goal line. The team on offense can make progress during the play by advancing the ball from the line of scrimmage.

When the offensive team advances the ball by rushing the football, the player who carries the ball is given credit for the net gain, measured in rushing yards. When the offensive team advances the ball by pass reception, the player who throws the ball earns passing yards and the player who receives the ball earns receiving yards. The total of rushing yards and passing yards (but not receiving yards) is known as total offense. Although the ball may also be advanced by penalty, these yards do not contribute to total offense. Progress lost via quarterback sacks are classified differently, depending upon the league and/or level of football.

When defenses are measured on total offense allowed, it is called total defense.

Some definitions of individual total offense give credit to both the passer and receiver for passing yards. Thus, if a quarterback catches a pass in a trick play, or a non-quarterback throws a pass, some statistical issues arise.[3]

Steve McNair holds the NCAA career and single-season total offense/game records. Case Keenum, B.J. Symons, and David Klingler hold the total offense career, single-season and single game records.[4][5]

NCAA definition

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) defines the term as "Total offense is the total of net gain rushing and net gain forward passing. Receiving and runback yards are not included in total offense." (at pg. 206).[5]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "2007 National Leaders Total Offense - All Games". cfbstats.com. December 2, 2007. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  2. ^ "2007 National Leaders Total Offense - All Games". cfbstats.com. December 2, 2007. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  3. ^ "TOTAL OFFENSE". SI.com. Time Inc. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  4. ^ "UH's Keenum becomes NCAA's all-time leader in offense in 63-28 win". Retrieved October 23, 2011.
  5. ^ a b "Official 2007 NCAA Division I Football Record Book" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 1, 2007. Retrieved January 3, 2008.
1925 Dartmouth Indians football team

The 1925 Dartmouth Indians football team represented Dartmouth College in the 1925 college football season. The team finished with an 8–0 record and was named as the 1925 national champion by the Dickinson System and Parke H. Davis. They outscored their opponents 340 to 29.Andy Oberlander passed for 14 touchdowns and ran for 12. Dartmouth defeated Harvard 32–9, its best victory to date over the Crimson. In a 62–13 victory over Cornell, Oberlander had 477 yards in total offense, including six touchdown passes, a Dartmouth record which still stands. He was responsible for some 500 yards of total offense. Cornell coach Gil Dobie responded "We won the game 13–0, passing is not football." The season closed with a 33–7 victory over defending Big Ten champion Chicago. Oberlander threw three touchdowns.

1957 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1957 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Seven Conference (Big 7) during the 1957 NCAA University Division football season. The team compiled a 5–4–1 record (3–3 against Big 7 opponents), finished in a tie for third place in the Big 7, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 157 to 149. Frank Broyles was the head coach for the first and only season. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's statistical leaders included Hank Kuhlman with 554 rushing yards, 569 yards of total offense, and 48 points scored, Phil Snowden with 299 passing yards and 567 yards of total offense, and Charley James with 132 receiving yards.

1966 BYU Cougars football team

The 1966 BYU Cougars football team was an American football team that represented Brigham Young University in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1966 college football season. In their third season under head coach Tommy Hudspeth, the Cougars compiled an 8–2 record (3–2 against WAC opponents), tied for second in the WAC, and outscored opponents by a total of 269 to 163.Quarterback Virgil Carter led the country with 2,545 yards of total offense; he also led the team with 2,182 passing yards and 56 points scored. On November 5, 1966, he set new NCAA single-game records with 513 passing yards and 599 yards of total offense against Texas Western. Carter's totals of 513 passing yards and 599 yards of total offense stood as BYU school records until broken by Ty Detmer in 1991.The team's other statistical leaders included John Ogden with 906 rushing yards and Phil Odle with 920 receiving yards.Six BYU players were selected to the all-conference team: wide receiver Phil Odle; guard Grant Wilson; quarterback Virgil Carter; fullback John Ogden; linebacker Curg Belcher; and safety Bobby Roberts.

Auburn Tigers football statistical leaders

The Auburn Tigers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Auburn Tigers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, Single season and career leaders. The Tigers represent Auburn University in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Auburn began competing in intercollegiate football in 1892, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1947. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1947, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward Single season and career statistics in 2002. The Tigers have played in 14 bowl games since this decision.

The Tigers have had two seasons, 2010 and 2013, in which the Tigers run a high-octane offense that racked up 6,989 and 7,018 offensive yards, respectively. In fact, eight of the Tigers' ten seasons with the highest offensive output have come since 2000 under head coaches Tommy Tuberville, Gene Chizik, and Gus Malzahn.These lists are updated through the end of the 2017 season.

Bob Chappuis

Robert Richard "Bob" Chappuis ( CHAP-ee-əs; February 24, 1923 – June 14, 2012) was an American football player who played halfback and quarterback for the University of Michigan Wolverines in 1942, 1946, and 1947. His college years were interrupted by service in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Chappuis flew 21 missions as a radio operator and aerial gunner on B-25 bombers in the European Theater. His aircraft was shot down in February 1945 in the Lombardy region of Northern Italy. Chappuis parachuted from the plane before it crashed, and Italian partisans rescued him by hiding Chappuis and two other crew members for the final three months of the war.

After the war, Chappuis returned to Michigan where he broke the Big Nine Conference record for total offense in 1946 and then broke his own record in 1947. He led the 1947 Michigan team known as the "Mad Magicians" to an undefeated season and a 49–0 win over the USC Trojans in the 1948 Rose Bowl game. Chappuis was a unanimous All-American selection in 1947 and was named the Most Valuable Player of the 1948 Rose Bowl. His picture appeared on the cover of Time magazine in 1947 in connection with a feature article about Chappuis and the 1947 Wolverines. He placed second in the 1947 Heisman Trophy balloting.

During his career he established many football records that lasted for over a generation and became an All-American. He continues to hold the Big Ten Conference single-season passer rating record and the Michigan Wolverines single-season yards/completion records. He was one of the early passing specialists in an era where football players were just beginning to either play on offense or defense instead of both.

Chappuis played professional football in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) as a quarterback for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Chicago Hornets in 1948 and 1949. He led the Dodgers in total offense in 1948 with 1,402 yards passing and 310 yards rushing. When both clubs and the AAFC folded, Chappuis retired from football in 1950. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1988.

Denard Robinson

Denard Xavier Robinson (born September 22, 1990) is an American football running back for the Atlanta Legends of the Alliance of American Football (AAF). He was drafted by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the fifth round of the 2013 NFL Draft. Robinson was the starting quarterback in all 26 games for the 2010 and 2011 Michigan Wolverines football teams and played at the same position as a senior for the 2012 team as well as running back and wide receiver in the second half of the season.

As a sophomore in 2010, Robinson set the single-season Division I FBS record for rushing yards by a quarterback and became the only player in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) history to both pass and rush for 1,500 yards. Robinson also broke the Big Ten Conference season record with 4,272 yards of total offense (2,570 yards passing and 1,702 yards rushing) and led the conference in rushing. In his second start at quarterback against Notre Dame, he set the Michigan single-game record with 502 yards of total offense. He was awarded the 2010 Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Most Valuable Player in the Big Ten Conference and was selected by the Football Writers Association of America as a first-team All-American. He also set the Big Ten single-game record for rushing yards by a quarterback and became the only player in NCAA Division I FBS history to both pass for 200 yards and rush for 200 yards in a regular season game twice.

As a junior in 2011, Robinson led a resurgent Michigan team to an 11–2 record and a victory over Virginia Tech in the 2012 Sugar Bowl. He threw for a career-high 338 passing yards in a come-from-behind victory over Notre Dame in the first night game played at Michigan Stadium. At the end of the 2011 season, Robinson had eight of the top 10 single-game total offense totals in Michigan history, including 948 yards in two games against Notre Dame. His total offense output in 2010 (4,272 yards) and 2011 (3,348 yards) rank as the top two single-season totals in Michigan history. As a senior in 2012, he extended his record with a third game with both 200 yards rushing and 200 yards passing.

As a freshman and sophomore, he also competed as a sprinter for the Michigan men's track and field team. He has run the 40-yard dash in 4.32 seconds, and he recorded the fastest competition time in 2010 among Michigan's sprinters in the 60-meter dash.

Georgia Bulldogs football statistical leaders

The Georgia Bulldogs football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Georgia Bulldogs football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, Single season and career leaders. The Bulldogs represent the University of Georgia in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Georgia began competing in intercollegiate football in 1892, the school's official record book often does not generally include statistics from before the 1950s, as records from this era are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Bulldogs have played in a bowl game every year since this decision, giving recent players at least one extra game each year to accumulate statistics. In the 2017 season, the Bulldogs played in the College Football Playoff National Championship, giving players in that season yet another game. Similarly, the Bulldogs have played in the SEC Championship Game five times since first qualifying in 2002.

The Bulldog teams under recent head coach Mark Richt, who coached from 2001 through 2015, have had some of the highest-gaining offenses in Georgia history. All 5 of the top 5 seasons in team total offense have come under Richt.These lists are updated through Georgia's game against Austin Peay on September 1, 2018. The Georgia Football Media Guide generally does not list a full top 10 in the single-game records.

Illinois Fighting Illini football statistical leaders

The Illinois Fighting Illini football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Illinois Fighting Illini football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Fighting Illini represent the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in the NCAA's Big Ten Conference.

Although Illinois began competing in intercollegiate football in 1890, the school's official record book generally does not include statistics from before the 1950s, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent. An exception to this is Red Grange, who appears several times on these lists despite playing in the 1920s.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1950s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Fighting Illini have played in 4 bowl games since then, all since 2008, giving recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

List of NCAA major college football yearly passing leaders

The list of college football yearly passing and total offense leaders identifies the major college passing leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) passing yardage; (2) passing touchdowns; and (3) passer rating.

List of NCAA major college football yearly total offense leaders

The list of college football yearly total offense leaders identifies the major college leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in two statistical categories: (1) total offense yards, and (2) total offense yards per game. From 1937 to 1969, the NCAA determined its national total offense individual title based on total yardage. Starting in 1970, the NCAA began making that determination based on total offense yards per game.

Maryland Terrapins football statistical leaders

The Maryland Terrapins football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Maryland Terrapins football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Terrapins represent the University of Maryland, College Park in the NCAA's Big Ten Conference.

Although Maryland began competing in intercollegiate football in 1892, the school's official record book has no entries before 1949, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1950s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Terrapins have played in nine bowl games since this decision, giving players on many recent teams an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Michigan State Spartans football statistical leaders

The Michigan State Spartans football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Michigan State Spartans football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, total offense, receiving, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, Single season and career leaders. The Spartans represent Michigan State University in the NCAA's Big 10 Conference.

Although Michigan State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1896, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1945. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1945, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Spartans have played in 10 bowl games since then.

Similarly, the Spartans have played in the Big Ten Championship Game three times since it began in 2011, so players in those seasons had 14 games to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Navy Midshipmen football statistical leaders

The Navy Midshipmen football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Navy Midshipmen football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Midshipmen represent the United States Naval Academy in the NCAA's American Athletic Conference.

Although Navy began competing in intercollegiate football in 1879, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1938. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1938, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Midshipmen have played in 14 bowls since then, allowing recent players an extra game almost every year to accumulate statistics.

Navy also played in the American Athletic Conference Championship Game in 2016, giving players in that season yet another game to accumulate statistics.

Navy tends to run a triple option offense, which emphasizes running with the quarterback and multiple running backs. This has allowed quarterbacks like Keenan Reynolds and Ricky Dobbs to appear high on both rushing and passing lists.These lists are updated through Navy's game against UCF on November 10, 2018.

Oregon State Beavers football statistical leaders

The Oregon State Beavers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Oregon State Beavers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Beavers represent Oregon State University in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although Oregon State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1893, the school's official record book doesn't generally list statistics from before the 1950s, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1950s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Beavers have played in 9 bowl games since this decision, allowing many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Penn State Nittany Lions football statistical leaders

The Penn State Nittany Lions football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Penn State Nittany Lions football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Nittany Lions represent Pennsylvania State University in the NCAA's Big Ten Conference.

Although Penn State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1887, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1970. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1970, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002, allowing players in most seasons since then an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through November 4, 2017, after the first nine games of the 2017 season.

Pittsburgh Panthers football statistical leaders

The Pittsburgh Panthers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Pittsburgh Panthers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Panthers represent University of Pittsburgh in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Although Pittsburgh began competing in intercollegiate football in 1890, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in the 1950s. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1950s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Panthers have played in 12 bowl games since this decision, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season. Note that Pittsburgh's official media guide does not give a full top 10 in many of these categories.

Tom Burgess (Canadian football)

Tom Burgess (born March 6, 1964) is a former all-star quarterback in the Canadian Football League (CFL).

Burgess was a graduate of Colgate University, playing from 1982 to 1985, and was inducted into the Colgate University Athletic Hall of Honor in 1986. As a senior on the 1985 squad, he was named honorable mention Associated Press All-American after setting 14 school records in passing and total offense. He finished ninth in the nation in total offense with 266.1 yards per game. Burgess also received Colgate’s Andy Kerr Trophy, given annually to the squad’s most valuable offensive player. He threw for a school-record 2,565 yards in 1985 and gained a school-record 2,927 yards of total offense.

He moved to Canada in 1986, and played for the Ottawa Rough Riders, the Saskatchewan Roughriders and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. He was instrumental in the Roughriders playoff run for their 1989 Grey Cup victory and quarterbacked the Blue Bombers to a Grey Cup win in 1990. Burgess was named the Grey Cup's Most Valuable Player on Offence of the 78th Grey Cup.

Tom Burgess was part of a quarterback tandem in Saskatchewan with Kent Austin. Burgess defeated the 16-2 Edmonton Eskimos in the 1989 CFL Western Final replacing an injured Austin who would return to start and win the 1989 Grey Cup. Both quarterbacks were capable starters and Burgess requested a trade in the off-season to pursue a full-time starting opportunity.

Burgess was a full-time starter for the next five seasons. He won a Grey Cup and became an eastern Division all-star selection. He enjoyed a 5,000 yard, 30 TD passing season with Ottawa.

He spent his final two seasons as a Roughrider and was inducted into the Saskatchewan Roughrider Plaza of Honor in 2009.

UMass Minutemen football statistical leaders

The UMass Minutemen football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the UMass Minutemen football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Minutemen represent the University of Massachusetts Amherst as an Independent in the NCAA.

Although UMass began competing in intercollegiate football in 1879, the school's official record book does not generally include entries from before the 1960s, as records from before this period are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1960s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Vanderbilt Commodores football statistical leaders

The Vanderbilt Commodores football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Vanderbilt Commodores football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, Single season and career leaders. The Commodores represent Vanderbilt University in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Vanderbilt began competing in intercollegiate football in 1890, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Commodores have played in five bowl games since them.

The 2011, 2012, and 2013 seasons, all played under head coach James Franklin, are the three-highest scoring Commodore seasons of the modern era, and three of the four seasons with the most offensive yards.The statistics below are updated through the end of the 2017 season.

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