Total bases

In baseball statistics, total bases is the number of bases a player has gained with hits. It is a weighted sum for which the weight value is 1 for a single, 2 for a double, 3 for a triple and 4 for a home run. Only bases attained from hits count toward this total. Reaching base by other means (such as a base on balls) or advancing further after the hit (such as when a subsequent batter gets a hit) does not increase the player's total bases. In box scores and other statistical summaries, total bases is often denoted by the abbreviation TB.[1][2]

The total bases divided by the number of at bats is the player's slugging average.

Records

Hank Aaron's 6,856 career total bases make him the all-time MLB record holder.[3] Having spent the majority of his career playing in the National League, he also holds the NL record of 6,591 total bases.[4] Aaron hit for 300 or more total bases in a record 15 different seasons.[5] Ty Cobb's 5,854 total bases constitute the American League record.[6] Albert Pujols is the active leader and 9th all-time, with 5,640 TB through August 11, 2018.[7][8]

The single season MLB and American League records are held by Babe Ruth, who hit for 457 TB in the 1921 season.[9] The following season saw Rogers Hornsby set the National League record when he hit for 450 total bases.[10]

Shawn Green holds the single game total bases record of 19 TB. Green hit four home runs, a single and a double for the Los Angeles Dodgers against the Milwaukee Brewers on May 23, 2002.[11] The equivalent American League record is held by Josh Hamilton, who hit four home runs and a double (18 TB) for the Texas Rangers in a May 8, 2012, game versus the Baltimore Orioles.[11]

Dustin Pedroia is the only player to have hit for 15 total bases in an interleague game. Pedroia hit three home runs, a single and a double for the Boston Red Sox on June 24, 2010, in a game against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field.[12]

The 2003 Boston Red Sox hit for 2,832 total bases in the AL; the National League team record for a single season is held by the 2001 Colorado Rockies (2,748 TB).[13] The Red Sox also have the record for most total bases by a team in one game: they hit for 60 TB in a 29–4 victory over the St. Louis Browns on June 8, 1950.[14]

Two players have hit for 14 total bases in a postseason game. Albert Pujols is the only player to accomplish this in the World Series, doing so for the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 3 of the 2011 World Series. Bob Robertson also achieved the feat while playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates in Game 2 of the 1971 National League Championship Series.[15] David Freese (50 TB in the 2011 postseason) holds the record for a single postseason, while Derek Jeter has the career postseason record of 302 total bases.[16]

The Boston Red Sox hit for 45 total bases in their 23–7 victory over the Cleveland Indians in Game 4 of the 1999 American League Division Series, a postseason record. The most total bases by a team in a World Series game is 34, by the Atlanta Braves in Game 5 of the 1991 World Series. They beat the Minnesota Twins by a score of 14–5.[17]

Ted Williams hit for a record 10 total bases in the All-Star Game when representing the American League in the 1946 edition.[18] The AL team hit for 29 TB in both the 1954 and 1992 editions of the All-Star Game, while the National League hit for their best ever (25 total bases) in the 1951 game.[19]

Among major league pitchers, Phil Niekro gave up the most total bases in a career (7,473),[20] while Robin Roberts (555 TB allowed in 1956) holds the single season record.[21] The record number of total bases allowed in a single game by one pitcher is 42, by Allan Travers of the Detroit Tigers.[22]

References

  1. ^ "Team Batting Game Finder: From 1988 to 2018, Playing for SFG, (requiring TB>=40), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  2. ^ "Giants 13, Braves 4". MLB.com. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  3. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  4. ^ "Batting Season & Career Finder: Spanning Multiple Seasons or entire Careers, Playing in the NL, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB>=5500), sorted by greatest Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  5. ^ "Batting Season & Career Finder: For Single Seasons, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB>=300), sorted by greatest Seasons matching criteria". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  6. ^ "Batting Season & Career Finder: Spanning Multiple Seasons or entire Careers, Playing in the AL, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB>=5500), sorted by greatest Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  7. ^ "Active Leaders & Records for Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved August 12, 2018.
  8. ^ "Batting Season & Career Finder: Spanning Multiple Seasons or entire Careers, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB>=5000), sorted by greatest Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  9. ^ "Single-Season Leaders & Records for Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  10. ^ "Batting Season & Career Finder: For Single Seasons, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB>=425), sorted by greatest Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Batting Game Finder: From 1908 to 2018, (requiring TB>=17), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  12. ^ "Batting Game Finder: From 1908 to 2018, in Inter-league play, (requiring TB>=13), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  13. ^ "Team Batting Season Finder: For Single Seasons, from 1871 to 2018, Total Bases>=2700, Standard statistics, Sorted by greatest Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  14. ^ "Team Batting Game Finder: From 1908 to 2018, (requiring TB>=50), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  15. ^ "Batting Game Finder: In the Postseason, From 1903 to 2017, (requiring TB>=12), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  16. ^ "All-time and Single-Season Postseason Batting Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  17. ^ "Team Batting Game Finder: In the Postseason, From 1903 to 2017, (requiring TB>=32), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  18. ^ "Team Batting Game Finder: In the All-Star Game, From 1933 to 2017, (requiring TB>=8), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  19. ^ "Team Batting Game Finder: In the All-Star Game, From 1933 to 2017, (requiring TB>=22), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  20. ^ "Pitching Season & Career Finder: Spanning Multiple Seasons or entire Careers, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB>=6000), Stats only available back to 1908 and some partially complete., sorted by greatest Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  21. ^ "Pitching Season & Career Finder: For Single Seasons, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB>=475), Stats only available back to 1908 and some partially complete., sorted by greatest Total Bases". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  22. ^ "Pitching Game Finder: From 1908 to 2018, (requiring TB>=35), sorted by greatest TB". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 9, 2018.

External links

2002 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 2002 season saw Dan Evans take over as General Manager and in his first season the team won 92 games and was not eliminated from post season contention until the next-to-last day of the season, finishing third overall in the Western Division of the National League. Shawn Green hit 42 home runs to become the first L.A. Dodger to have back-to-back 40 or more homer seasons. He had four homers in one game on May 23 against the Milwaukee Brewers. He went 6 for 6 in that game and set a Major League mark for total bases with 19. The number broke the previous record of 18 total bases set by Joe Adcock. Éric Gagné who had been a starter previously became the closer in 2002 and set a club mark with 52 saves. This is also their first season to be broadcast on KCOP (13).

Beau Bell

Roy Chester "Beau" Bell (August 20, 1907 – September 14, 1977) was an American professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1935 to 1941 for the St. Louis Browns, Detroit Tigers, and Cleveland Indians. Bell was named to the 1937 American League All-Star Team.

Bell finished 13th in voting for the 1936 American League MVP for playing in 155 games and having 616 at bats, 100 runs, 212 hits, 40 doubles, 12 triples, 11 home runs, 123 runs batted in, four stolen bases, 60 base on balls, a .344 batting average, .403 on-base percentage, .502 slugging percentage, 309 total bases and six sacrifice hits.

He finished 17th in voting for the 1937 AL MVP for leading the league in hits (218) and doubles (51) and playing in 156 games and having 642 at bats, 82 runs, eight triples, 14 home runs, 117 runs batted in, two stolen bases, 53 base on balls, a .340 batting average, .391 on-base percentage, .509 slugging percentage, 327 total bases and three sacrifice hits. His 51 doubles remains an Orioles single season record.

In seven seasons Bell played in 767 games and had 2,718 at bats, 378 runs, 806 hits, 165 doubles, 32 triples, 46 home runs, 437 runs batted in, 11 stolen bases, 272 base on balls, a .297 batting average, .362 on-base percentage, .432 slugging percentage, 1,173 total bases and 26 sacrifice hits.

An alumnus of the University of Houston and Texas A&M University, he died in College Station, Texas at the age of 70.

Deacon White

James Laurie "Deacon" White (December 2, 1847 – July 7, 1939) was an American baseball player who was one of the principal stars during the first two decades of the sport's professional era. The outstanding catcher of the 1870s during baseball's barehanded period, he caught more games than any other player during the decade, and was a major figure on five consecutive championship teams from 1873 to 1877 – three in the National Association (NA), in which he played throughout its five-year existence from 1871 to 1875, and two in the National League (NL), which was formed as the first fully recognized major league in 1876, partially as a result of White and three other stars moving from the powerhouse Boston Red Stockings to the Chicago White Stockings. Although he was already 28 when the NL was established, White played 15 seasons in the major leagues, completing a 23-year career at the top levels of the sport.

In 1871, White was the first batter to come to the plate in the National Association, the first professional baseball league. After compiling a .347 batting average over five NA seasons, he led the NL in runs batted in (RBI) in its first two seasons of play, and also led the league in batting (.387), slugging average, hits, triples and total bases in a brief shift to first base in 1877. For three years afterward, he joined his younger brother Will, a successful pitcher, with the Cincinnati Reds and Cincinnati Stars. In his mid-30s he became an effective third baseman when the toil of catching had become too great, and was a major force on the championship Detroit Wolverines team of 1887, batting .303 at age 39. Over the 20-year period of his career, White batted .312 and had more RBI (988) than any player except Cap Anson. Upon his retirement, he was among baseball's all-time leaders in career games, at bats, hits and total bases. He ranked fourth in career total chances at third base, fifth in assists, and sixth in putouts and double plays. White was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2013.

Frank Howard (baseball)

Frank Oliver Howard (born August 8, 1936), nicknamed "Hondo", "The Washington Monument" and "The Capitol Punisher", is a former All-Star outfielder, coach and manager in Major League Baseball who played most of his career for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Washington Senators/Texas Rangers franchises.

One of the most physically intimidating players in the sport, the 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) Howard would typically tip the scales at between 275 and 290 pounds, according to former Senators/Rangers trainer Bill Zeigler. Howard was named the National League's Rookie of the Year in 1960, and went on to twice lead the American League in home runs and total bases and in slugging percentage, runs batted in and walks once each. His 382 career home runs were the eighth most by a right-handed hitter when he retired; his 237 home runs and 1969 totals of 48 HRs and 340 total bases in a Washington uniform are a record for any of that city's several franchises. Howard's Washington/Texas franchise records of 1,172 games, 4,120 at bats, 246 HRs, 1,141 hits, 701 RBI, 544 runs, 155 doubles, 2,074 total bases and a .503 slugging percentage have since been broken.

Gavvy Cravath

Clifford Carlton "Gavvy" Cravath (March 23, 1881 – May 23, 1963), also nicknamed "Cactus", was an American right fielder and right-handed batter in Major League Baseball who played primarily for the Philadelphia Phillies. One of the sport's most prolific power hitters of the dead-ball era, in the seven years from 1913 to 1920 he led the National League in home runs six times, in runs batted in, total bases and slugging percentage twice each, and in hits, runs and walks once each. He led the NL in several offensive categories in 1915 as the Phillies won the first pennant in the team's 33-year history, and he held the team's career home run record from 1917 to 1924. However, he played his home games at Baker Bowl, a park that was notoriously favorable to batting statistics. Cravath hit 92 career homers at Baker Bowl while he had 25 homers in all his games away from home.

Jim O'Rourke (baseball)

James Henry O'Rourke (September 1, 1850 – January 8, 1919), nicknamed "Orator Jim", was an American professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball who played primarily as a left fielder. For the period 1876–1892, he ranks behind only Cap Anson in career major league games played (1644), hits (2146), at-bats (6884), doubles (392) and total bases (2936), and behind only Harry Stovey in runs scored (1370) (Stovey was a younger player; Anson played five seasons and O'Rourke four prior to 1876.).

Jim Rice

James Edward Rice (born March 8, 1953), nicknamed "Jim Ed", is a former Major League Baseball left fielder and designated hitter who played his entire 16-year baseball career for the Boston Red Sox.

Rice was an eight-time American League (AL) All-Star and was named the AL's Most Valuable Player in 1978 after becoming the first major league player in 19 years to hit for 400 total bases. He went on to become the ninth player to lead the major leagues in total bases in consecutive seasons. He joined Ty Cobb as one of two players to lead the AL in total bases three years in a row. He batted .300 seven times, collected 100 runs batted in (RBI) eight times and 200 hits four times, and had eleven seasons with 20 home runs. He also led the league in home runs three times, RBIs and slugging percentage twice each.

In the late 1970s he was part of one of the sport's great outfields along with Fred Lynn and Dwight Evans (who was his teammate for his entire career); Rice continued the tradition of his predecessors Ted Williams and Carl Yastrzemski as a power-hitting left fielder who played his entire career for the Red Sox. He ended his career with a .502 slugging percentage, and then ranked tenth in AL history with 382 home runs; his career marks in homers, hits (2,452), RBI (1,451) and total bases (4,129) remain Red Sox records for a right-handed hitter, with Evans eventually surpassing his Boston records for career runs scored, at bats and extra base hits by a right-handed hitter. When Rice retired, his 1,503 career games in left field ranked seventh in AL history. Rice was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on July 26, 2009, as the 103rd member voted in by the BBWAA.

Joe Vosmik

Joseph Franklin Vosmik (April 4, 1910 – January 27, 1962) was an outfielder for the Cleveland Indians (1930–36), St. Louis Browns (1937), Boston Red Sox (1938–39), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940–41) and Washington Senators (1944). He helped the Dodgers win the 1941 National League Pennant.

He was voted to the 1935 American League All-Star Team as a right fielder. He finished 3rd in voting for the 1935 AL MVP Award for leading the league in hits (216), doubles (47) and triples (20). He also played in 152 games and had 620 at bats, 93 runs, 10 home runs, 110 RBIs, 2 stolen bases, 59 walks, a .348 batting average, a .408 on-base percentage, a .537 slugging percentage, 333 total bases, and 5 sacrifice hits. He finished 21st in voting for the 1938 AL MVP Award for leading the league in hits (201), playing in 146 games, and having 621 at-bats, 121 runs, 37 doubles, 6 triples, 9 home runs, 86 RBIs, 59 walks, a .324 batting average, a .384 on-base percentage, a .446 slugging percentage, 277 total bases, and 7 sacrifice hits.

In 13 seasons he played in 1,414 games and had 5,472 at-bats, 818 runs, 1,682 hits, 335 doubles, 92 triples, 65 home runs, 874 RBIs, 23 stolen bases, 514 walks, a .307 batting average, a .369 on-base percentage, a .438 slugging percentage, 2,396 total bases, and 77 sacrifice hits. His career fielding percentage was .979.

From 1947 to 1951 he was a manager in the minor league system of the Indians.

He died in his home town at the age of 51.

List of Chicago Cubs team records

The following lists statistical records and all-time leaders as well as awards and major accomplishments for the Chicago Cubs professional baseball club of Major League Baseball. The records list the top 5 players in each category since the inception of the Cubs.

Players that are still active with the Cubs are denoted in bold.

Records updated as of August 5, 2011.

List of Major League Baseball career records

In Major League Baseball (MLB), records play an integral part in evaluating a player's impact on the sport. Holding a career record almost guarantees a player eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame because it represents both longevity and consistency over a long period of time.

List of Major League Baseball career total bases leaders

In baseball statistics, total bases (TB) is the number of bases a player has gained with hits. It is a weighted sum for which the weight value is 1 for a single, 2 for a double, 3 for a triple and 4 for a home run. Only bases attained from hits count toward this total. Reaching base by other means (such as a base on balls) or advancing further after the hit (such as when a subsequent batter gets a hit) does not increase the player's total bases.

The total bases divided by the number of at bats is the player's slugging average.

Hank Aaron is the career leader in total bases with 6,856. Stan Musial (6,134) and Willie Mays (6,066) are the only other players with at least 6,000 career total bases.

List of Miami Marlins team records

The Miami Marlins are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in the U.S. state of Florida. The Marlins became members of MLB as an expansion team in the 1993 season. Through 2017, they have played 3,981 games, winning 1,870 and losing 2,111 for a winning percentage of .470. This list documents the superlative records and accomplishments of team members during their tenures as Marlins in MLB's National League East.

Giancarlo Stanton holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2018 season, with ten records, including both the most career and single-season Home runs, RBI, slugging percentage, and total bases records.

No Marlin holds a Major League or National League record for any of the below statistics. However, the Marlins are tied with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and the Houston Astros for the shortest franchise record losing streak, recording 11 straight losses twice in 1998 and once in June 2011.

List of New York Yankees team records

The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in the Bronx, New York. They compete in the East Division of Major League Baseball's (MLB) American League (AL). The club began play in 1903 as the Highlanders, after owners Frank Farrell and William S. Devery had bought the defunct Baltimore Orioles and moved the team to New York City; in 1913, the team changed its nickname to the Yankees. From 1903 to 2018, the franchise has won more than 10,000 games and 27 World Series championships. The list below documents players and teams that hold particular club records.

Outfielder Babe Ruth holds the most franchise records, with 16, including career home runs, and career and single-season batting average and on-base percentage. Shortstop Derek Jeter has the second-most records among hitters, with eight. Jeter's marks include the records for career hits, singles, doubles, and stolen bases. Among pitchers, Whitey Ford has the most Yankees records with five, all of which are career totals. These include games won, games started, and innings pitched.

Several Yankees hold AL and MLB records. Ruth has MLB single-season records for extra-base hits and total bases, and holds four other AL single-season records. Outfielder Joe DiMaggio had a 56-game hitting streak in the 1941 season, which remains an MLB record. Jack Chesbro holds three AL records that he set in 1904: games won, games started, and complete games.

Merv Rettenmund

Mervin Weldon Rettenmund (born June 6, 1943) is an American former Major League Baseball player and coach. He played thirteen seasons with the Baltimore Orioles (1968–73), the Cincinnati Reds (1974–75), the San Diego Padres (1976–77) and the California Angels (1979–80).

He helped the Orioles win the 1969 and 1971 American League pennant, the 1970 World Series and the 1973 AL Eastern Division, the Reds win the 1975 World Series and the Angels win the 1979 AL Western Division. He also served as hitting coach for the 1989 World Series champion Oakland Athletics, as well as the Athletics' 1990 A.L. pennant-winners, and the 1998 National League champion Padres.

He finished 19th in voting for the 1971 AL MVP for playing in 141 Games and having 491 At Bats, 81 Runs, 156 Hits, 23 Doubles, 4 Triples, 11 Home Runs, 75 RBI, 15 Stolen Bases, 87 Walks, .318 Batting Average (which was third best in the American League to Bobby Murcer of the New York Yankees [.331], and Tony Oliva of the Minnesota Twins [.337]), .422 On-base percentage, .448 Slugging Percentage, 220 Total Bases, 4 Sacrifice Hits, 3 Sacrifice Flies and 2 Intentional Walks.

After the trade of Frank Robinson to the Los Angeles Dodgers in early-December 1971, Rettenmund began the 1972 season as the Orioles' starting right fielder. By 1973, he was out of the starting lineup due to injuries, prolonged batting slumps and the emergence of Al Bumbry and Rich Coggins. Rettenmund, along with Junior Kennedy and Bill Wood, was sent to the Cincinnati Reds for Ross Grimsley and Wally Williams on December 4, 1973.In 13 seasons, he played in 1,023 Games and had 2,555 At Bats, 393 Runs, 693 Hits, 114 Doubles, 16 Triples, 66 Home Runs, 329 RBI, 68 Stolen Bases, 445 Walks, .271 Batting Average, .381 On-base percentage, .406 Slugging Percentage, 1,037 Total Bases, 36 Sacrifice Hits, 20 Sacrifice Flies and 15 Intentional Walks. He recorded a .985 Fielding Percentage at all 3 outfield positions in his major league career.

After his major league career, Rettenmund served as hitting coach for the Texas Rangers (1983–85), the Athletics (1989–90), the Padres (1991–99), the Atlanta Braves (2000–01), and the Detroit Tigers (2002).

After three years out of the majors, Rettenmund returned as hitting coach of the Padres in June, 2006, replacing Dave Magadan. However, he himself was replaced in mid-season the next year (July 31, 2007), by Wally JoynerRettenmund currently resides in San Diego, California.

Minneapolis Millerettes

The Minneapolis Millerettes were an expansion All-American Girls Professional Baseball League team that played for one season in 1944. They played their home games in Nicollet Park, home of the men's minor league team the Minneapolis Millers. The Millerettes' uniform consisted of a maroon cap and socks and a dress uniform with the circular Minneapolis city seal at the center of the chest.

The Millerettes spent most of their season on the road, playing poorly. The team was managed by Bubber Jonnard, and finished 26 and a half games out of first place, with a 45-72 record. Due to the homeless state of their schedule, players and league officials nicknamed the Minneapolis team, The Orphans.

The most significant players were pitcher Dorothy Wiltse, who posted a 20-16 record and a 1.88 ERA in 38 appearances, and outfielder Helen Callaghan, who finished second in the league in average (.287) and third in runs (81), hits (114), home runs (3), and total bases (136).

The following year, the Millerettes moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana, where they became the Fort Wayne Daisies.

Shawn Green

Shawn David Green (born November 10, 1972) is an American former Major League Baseball right-fielder. Green was a 1st round draft pick and a two-time major league All-Star. He drove in 100 runs four times and scored 100 runs four times, hit 40 or more home runs three times, led the league in doubles, extra base hits, and total bases, won both a Gold Glove Award and a Silver Slugger Award, and set the Dodgers single-season record in home runs. Green was also in the top five in the league in home runs, RBIs, intentional walks, and MVP voting.

Green holds or is tied for the following major league records: most home runs in a game (4), most extra base hits in a game (5), most total bases in a game (19), most runs scored in a game (6), most home runs in two consecutive games (5), most home runs in three consecutive games (7), and most consecutive home runs (4). He hit his 4 home runs, 5 extra base hits, and 19 total bases in one game against the Milwaukee Brewers in 2002. Green broke the record of 18 total bases (4 home runs and double) set by Joe Adcock of the Milwaukee Braves (vs. Brooklyn Dodgers) in 1954.

At the time of his retirement, he was one of only four active players with at least 300 home runs, 1,000 runs and RBIs, 400 doubles, a .280 batting average, and 150 stolen bases. The others were Barry Bonds, Ken Griffey, Jr., and Gary Sheffield, each of whom was at least two years older than Green, with at least 1,400 more at bats (though in each case, the other three had considerably more home runs and, in the case of Bonds, far more doubles and runs scored too).

Green was noted for his smooth swing. He was also known for the strength and accuracy of his arm. For example, he had 14 assists from the outfield in 1998.

Slugging percentage

In baseball statistics, slugging percentage (SLG) is a measure of the batting productivity of a hitter. It is calculated as total bases divided by at bats, through the following formula, where AB is the number of at bats for a given player, and 1B, 2B, 3B, and HR are the number of singles, doubles, triples, and home runs, respectively:

Unlike batting average, slugging percentage gives more weight to extra-base hits such as doubles and home runs, relative to singles. Walks are specifically excluded from this calculation, as a plate appearance that ends in a walk is not counted as an at bat.

The name is a misnomer, as the statistic is not a percentage but a scale of measure whose computed value is a number from 0 to 4. The statistic gives a double twice the value of a single, a triple three times the value, and a home run four times.

A slugging percentage is always expressed as a decimal to three decimal places, and is generally spoken as if multiplied by 1000. For example, a slugging percentage of .589 would be spoken as "five eighty nine."

In 2018, the mean average SLG among all teams in Major League Baseball was .409.

Tip O'Neill (baseball)

James Edward "Tip" O'Neill (May 25, 1858 – December 31, 1915) was a Canadian professional baseball player from approximately 1875 to 1892. He began playing organized baseball in Woodstock, Ontario, Canada, and later played ten seasons in Major League Baseball, principally as a left fielder, but also as a pitcher, for four major league clubs.

While playing with the St. Louis Browns (later renamed the Cardinals) from 1884 to 1889, O'Neill helped the club compile a 516–247 record while also winning four pennants and the 1886 World Series. O'Neill won two American Association batting championships during those years and became the second person in major league history to hit for a triple crown, leading the league in 1887 with a .435 batting average, 14 home runs and 123 runs batted in (RBIs). He also rewrote the major league record book, establishing new records in at least eight categories, including the highest batting average (originally .492, adjusted to .435), on-base percentage (.490) and slugging percentage (.691), and the most hits (225), runs scored (167), doubles (52), extra base hits (84), and total bases (357) in a single season. His adjusted .435 batting average in 1887 remains the second highest in major league history.

O'Neill has been dubbed "Canada's Babe Ruth" and was posthumously inducted into both the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame. Each year since 1984, the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame has presented the Tip O'Neill Award to the best Canadian baseball player.

Todd Helton

Todd Lynn Helton (born August 20, 1973) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played his entire 17-year career for the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball (MLB). A five-time All-Star, four-time Silver Slugger, and three-time Gold Glove Award winner, Helton holds the Colorado Rockies club records for hits (2,519), home runs (369), doubles (592), walks (1,335), runs scored (1,401), runs batted in (RBI, with 1,406), games played (2,247), and total bases (4,292), among others.Each season from 1999–2004, Helton met or exceeded all of the following totals: .320 batting average, 39 doubles, 30 home runs, 107 runs scored, 96 RBI, .577 slugging percentage and .981 on-base plus slugging. In 2000, he won the batting title with a .372 average, and also led MLB with a .698 slugging percentage, 59 doubles, 147 RBI and the National League with 216 hits. Helton amassed his 2,000th career hit against the Atlanta Braves on May 19, 2009, and his 2,500th against the Cincinnati Reds on September 1, 2013.

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