Total Film

Total Film is a British film magazine published 13 times a year (published monthly and a summer issue is added every year since issue 91, 2004 which is published between July and August issue) by Future Publishing. The magazine was launched in 1997 and offers cinema, DVD and Blu-ray news, reviews and features. Total Film is available both in print and interactive iPad editions.

In 2014 it was announced online that Total Film's website would be merging with GamesRadar's website and all Total Film content would now be located on the GamesRadar website.[2]

Total Film
Total Film December 2018 cover
EditorJane Crowther
CategoriesFilm
FrequencyMonthly
Total circulation
(June 2013)
60,912[1]
First issueFebruary 1997
CompanyFuture plc
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Websitewww.totalfilm.com
ISSN1366-3135

Features

Each month, Total Film provides a range of features, from spotlight interviews with actors and directors, to making of and on-set pieces for new and future releases. Each issue always includes the 'Total Film Interview', which is a six-page in-depth chat with an actor or director, along with a critique of their body of work.

Key sections within the magazine

Dialogue
The section where readers can interact with the magazine, this contains readers' letters, emails and feedback from the magazine's social media followers (TF's Forum, Facebook and Twitter). Each month, TF offers a DVD for each published missive. A regular feature within Dialogue includes Office Spaced where snippets of conversation from the TF office are shared.
Buzz
The Total Film news section, providing details on upcoming films, includes first look photos, on-set visits and exclusive "sneak peeks". Regular features include: 'Ever Met Tom Cruise?' where a behind the scenes person is interviewed, e.g. a stuntwoman or a casting director; 'You Talkin' To Me?' where stars answer questions posed as famous film quotes and Red Light, Green Light for what is hot and what is not in movieland. Also included is the '60 Second Screenplay', which is a cut-down, humorous version of a movie script.
Agenda
Billed as being 'for the sharper movie fan', this section often previews more eclectic and less mainstream releases and players. Richard Ayoade from The IT Crowd writes a column for 'Agenda'.
Screen
The main cinema reviews section, with every new movie for that month reviewed and rated. Major releases receive comprehensive coverage, with a star rating out of five, the magazine's own 'Predicted Interest Curve'—a graph that demonstrates which moments of a film are likely to hold the viewer's attention and a short 'Verdict'. Also briefly listed are similar recommendations under 'See this if you liked...' Smaller films receive a concise review and rating. The end of the section is devoted to the current U.S. and UK box office charts, an irreverent flashback to an old issue and summaries of any films that were not shown to journalists in time for that month's print deadline.
Lounge
TF's home entertainment guide, including reviews of the latest DVDs and Blu-rays, as well as some games, soundtracks and books. Regular features include 'Is It Just Me?', where a TF writer gets to rant about a particular (often controversial) film-related point of view, with readers then given the right to reply via the TF Forum or website; 'Instant Expert' which gives a rundown of the key facts you need to know about an actor, director or movie genre; and 'TF Loves' which picks out a certain scene or character rated by the magazine.

Foreign editions

Licensed local editions of Total Film are released in many countries, including Turkey, Russia, Serbia, Croatia, Indonesia, plus many others.

Totalfilm.com

Total Film's online presence includes the website, forum & digital edition, as well as pages on Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. There is also a Total Film iPhone app.

Totalfilm.com 
Sections on the website include news, reviews, features, trailers and video, films coming soon, competitions, screening club and magazine. News is uploaded throughout the day; reviews are uploaded as they come in; features are updated daily; trailers and video and films coming soon are updated as soon as new film information becomes available. The website contains a database of every movie review featured in the magazine. Users of the website can subscribe to a weekly newsletter, featuring a 10-point rundown of the week's essential news, reviews and features, as well as competitions and free screenings RSS Feeds are available for: news, reviews, features and films coming soon. Users can also comment on any of the articles included on the website, as well as retweeting on Twitter and sharing on Facebook. Traffic on Totalfilm.com is growing exponentially, with 2.5m unique users and 40 million page views a month. Its social media presence also continues to grow, with a highly engaged audience of over 450k followers across Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr.
Forum 
The TF Forum has been in existence since 2004 and has a loyal group of long-time users, as well as an ever-evolving number of new users who chat and interact on a variety of subjects.
Facebook and Twitter 
Bespoke content is uploaded to Facebook and Twitter throughout the day. Posts include news stories and alerts for when a new review or trailer has been posted.
Tumblr 
TF's official blog is located at Tumblr. Bespoke content for Reviews, News, Features, Trailers, Posters, Office Talk and Covers is posted throughout the day.
iPhone App 
Total Film launched its iPhone app in August 2010. The app allows users to read the latest film news, live search TF's database of over 8,000 reviews, read daily film features, save favourite articles, find the nearest cinema, look up showtimes and watch high quality trailers.

Total Film on iPad

Total Film has been available in an interactive version for iPad since April 2012. Readers can interact with the pages, watch trailers and bespoke videos from photoshoots and link to buy DVDs from iTunes.

The Total Film iPad app won Film Magazine Of The Year at the 2012 Digital Magazine Awards. The judges said: “Full of tablet specific features, great content and interactivity. This a great read that makes the most of the digital format, a fantastic digital magazine”

See also

References

  1. ^ "Mag ABCs: Full circulation round-up for the first half of 2013". Press Gazette. 15 August 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2013.
  2. ^ Total Film (September 30, 2014). "IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT! A New Direction For Total Film And SFX Online". GamesRadar.

External links

Blade Runner

Blade Runner is a 1982 science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott, written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, and starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, and Edward James Olmos. It is a loose adaptation of Philip K. Dick's novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968). The film is set in a dystopian future Los Angeles of 2019, in which synthetic humans known as replicants are bio-engineered by the powerful Tyrell Corporation to work on off-world colonies. When a fugitive group of replicants led by Roy Batty (Hauer) escapes back to Earth, burnt-out cop Rick Deckard (Ford) reluctantly agrees to hunt them down.

Blade Runner initially underperformed in North American theaters and polarized critics; some praised its thematic complexity and visuals, while others were displeased with its slow pacing and unconventional plot. It later became an acclaimed cult film regarded as one of the all-time best science fiction movies. Hailed for its production design depicting a "retrofitted" future, Blade Runner is a leading example of neo-noir cinema. The soundtrack, composed by Vangelis, was nominated in 1983 for a BAFTA and a Golden Globe as best original score.

The film has influenced many science fiction films, video games, anime, and television series. It brought the work of Philip K. Dick to the attention of Hollywood, and several later big-budget films were based on his work. In the year after its release, Blade Runner won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, and in 1993 it was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". A sequel, Blade Runner 2049, was released in October 2017.

Seven versions of Blade Runner exist as a result of controversial changes made at the request of studio executives. A director's cut was released in 1992 after a strong response to test screenings of a workprint. This, in conjunction with the film's popularity as a video rental, made it one of the earliest movies to be released on DVD. In 2007, Warner Bros. released The Final Cut, a 25th-anniversary digitally remastered version, and the only version over which Scott retained artistic control.

Box-office bomb

In the motion picture industry, a "box-office bomb" or "box-office flop" is a film that is considered highly unsuccessful or unprofitable during its theatrical run, often following significant hype regarding its cost, production, or marketing efforts. Generally, any film for which the production and marketing costs exceed the combined revenue recovered after release is considered to have "bombed".Box-office bomb is a subjective term, as gauging the financial success of a film is difficult. There is also no reliable definition of the term. Not all films that fail to earn back their estimated costs during their theatrical runs are considered "bombs". The label is generally applied to films that miss earnings projections by a wide margin, particularly when they are very expensive to produce. Although this often occurs in conjunction with middling or poor reviews, critical reception has an imperfect connection to box-office performance.

Broadway Cinema

Broadway Cinema is an independent cinema in the city of Nottingham, United Kingdom.

It is located in the Hockley area. In 2009, the cinema was rated as one of the 'best in the world' by Total Film magazine.

Film School Rejects

Film School Rejects is an English-language blog devoted to movie reviews, interviews, film industry news, and feature commentary. It was founded by Neil Miller in February 2006.The site was nominated for Best News Blog by Total Film magazine and named one of the 50 best blogs for filmmakers by MovieMaker magazine. Its weekly podcast, Reject Radio, was voted as the fourth best podcast for movie fans by Movies.com.Film School Rejects and its contributors have been featured and quoted in regional and national media outlets, including The New York Times, CNN, the Los Angeles Times, Mashable, and American Public Media. The site's April Fools' Day pranks have been covered on MTV, Fandango, and BuzzFeed.

Guardians of the Galaxy (film)

Guardians of the Galaxy (retroactively referred to as Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 1) is a 2014 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team of the same name, produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. It is the tenth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The film was directed by James Gunn, who wrote the screenplay with Nicole Perlman, and features an ensemble cast including Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Vin Diesel, and Bradley Cooper as the titular Guardians, along with Lee Pace, Michael Rooker, Karen Gillan, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close, and Benicio del Toro. In Guardians of the Galaxy, Peter Quill forms an uneasy alliance with a group of extraterrestrial criminals who are fleeing after stealing a powerful artifact.

Perlman began working on the screenplay in 2009. Producer Kevin Feige first publicly mentioned Guardians of the Galaxy as a potential film in 2010 and Marvel Studios announced it was in active development at the San Diego Comic-Con International in July 2012. Gunn was hired to write and direct the film that September. In February 2013, Pratt was hired to play Peter Quill / Star-Lord, and the supporting cast members were subsequently confirmed. Principal photography began in July 2013 at Shepperton Studios in England, with filming continuing in London before wrapping up in October 2013. Post-production was finished on July 7, 2014.

The film premiered in Hollywood on July 21, 2014, and was released in theaters on August 1, 2014 in the United States in the 3D and IMAX 3D formats. The film became a critical and commercial success, grossing $773.3 million worldwide and becoming the highest-grossing superhero film of 2014, as well as the third-highest-grossing film of 2014. The film was praised for its humor, acting, direction, soundtrack, visual effects, and action sequences. At the 87th Academy Awards, the film received nominations for Best Visual Effects and Best Makeup and Hairstyling. A sequel, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, was released on May 5, 2017. A third film, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3, which was initially being developed for a 2020 release, has been put on hold after the firing of Gunn.

Hannibal (film)

Hannibal is a 2001 American psychological horror thriller film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from Thomas Harris's 1999 novel of the same name. It is the sequel to the 1991 Academy Award–winning film The Silence of the Lambs in which Anthony Hopkins returns to his role as the serial killer, Hannibal Lecter. Julianne Moore co-stars, in the role first held by Jodie Foster, as FBI Special Agent Clarice Starling.

The film had a difficult and occasionally troubling pre-production history. When the novel was published in 1999, The Silence of the Lambs director Jonathan Demme, screenwriter Ted Tally, and actress Jodie Foster all declined to be involved in its adaptation. Ridley Scott became attached as director after the success of Gladiator (2000), and eventually signed onto the project after reading the script pitched by Dino De Laurentiis, who produced Manhunter (1986), based on the 1981 Harris novel Red Dragon. After the departure of Foster and screenwriter Tally, Julianne Moore took on Foster's role while David Mamet and Steven Zaillian wrote the screenplay.

Set ten years after The Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal follows Starling's attempts to apprehend Lecter before his surviving victim, Mason Verger, captures him. It is set in Italy and the United States. The novel Hannibal drew attention for its violence. Hannibal broke box office records in the United States, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom in February 2001, but was met with a mixed critical reception.

If....

if.... is a 1968 British drama film produced and directed by Lindsay Anderson satirising English public school life. Famous for its depiction of a savage insurrection at a fictitious boys' boarding school, the X certificate film was made at the time of the May 1968 protests in France by a director who was strongly associated with the 1960s counterculture.

The film stars Malcolm McDowell in his first screen role and his first appearance as Anderson's "everyman" character Mick Travis. Richard Warwick, Christine Noonan, David Wood, and Robert Swann also star.

if.... won the Palme d'Or at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival.

In 1999, the British Film Institute named it the 12th greatest British film of the 20th Century; in 2004, the magazine Total Film named it the 16th greatest British film of all time. In 2017 a poll of 150 actors, directors, writers, producers and critics for Time Out magazine ranked it the 9th best British film ever.

Keanu Reeves

Keanu Charles Reeves ( keh-AH-noo; born September 2, 1964) is a Canadian actor, director, producer, and musician. He gained fame for his starring role performances in several blockbuster films, including comedies from the Bill and Ted franchise (1989–1991); action thrillers Point Break (1991), Speed (1994), and the John Wick franchise; psychological thriller The Devil's Advocate (1997); supernatural thriller Constantine (2005); and science fiction/action series The Matrix (1999–2003). He has also appeared in dramatic films such as Dangerous Liaisons (1988), My Own Private Idaho (1991), and Little Buddha (1993), as well as the romantic horror Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992).

Reeves has earned critical acclaim for his acting. One New York Times critic praised Reeves' versatility, saying that he "displays considerable discipline and range... he moves easily between the buttoned-down demeanor that suits a police procedural story and the loose-jointed manner of his comic roles". However, Reeves has spent much of his later career being typecast. A recurring character arc in many roles he has portrayed is one of saving the world, as can be seen in the characters of Ted Logan, Buddha, Neo, Johnny Mnemonic, John Constantine, and Klaatu. His acting has garnered several awards, including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

During his film career, Reeves has engaged in several forms of artistic expression. He is a musician and played bass guitar for the bands Dogstar and Becky. Acting onstage, he performed as Prince Hamlet for the Manitoba Theatre Centre's production of Hamlet. He wrote the text for a picture book, Ode to Happiness, illustrated by Alexandra Grant. He has also produced a documentary, Side by Side, and directed the martial arts film Man of Tai Chi.

Keyser Söze

Keyser Söze ( KY-zər SOH-zay) is a fictional character and the main antagonist in the 1995 film The Usual Suspects, written by Christopher McQuarrie and directed by Bryan Singer. According to petty con artist Roger "Verbal" Kint (Kevin Spacey), Söze is a crime lord whose ruthlessness and influence have acquired a legendary, even mythical, status among police and criminals alike. Further events in the story make these accounts unreliable, and, in a twist ending, a police sketch identifies Kint and Söze as one and the same. The character was inspired by real life murderer John List and the spy thriller No Way Out, which featured a shadowy KGB mole.

The character has placed in numerous "best villain" lists over the years, including AFI's 100 Years...100 Heroes & Villains. Spacey won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, turning him from a character actor into a star. Since the release of the film, the character has become synonymous with infamous criminals. Analysis of the character has focused on the ambiguity of his true identity and whether he even exists inside the story's reality. Though the filmmakers have preferred to leave the character's nature to viewer interpretation, Singer has said he believes Kint and Söze are the same person.

List of films considered the worst

The films listed below have been cited by a variety of notable critics in varying media sources as being among the worst films ever made. Examples of such sources include Metacritic, Roger Ebert's list of most-hated films, The Golden Turkey Awards, Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide, Rotten Tomatoes, the Stinkers Bad Movie Awards, Mystery Science Theater 3000, and the Golden Raspberry Awards (the "Razzies"). Films on these lists are generally feature-length films that are commercial in nature (intended to turn a profit), professionally produced (as opposed to amateur productions), and released in theaters, on television, or more recently through on-demand streaming services.

Michael Mann

Michael Kenneth Mann (born February 5, 1943) is an American film director, screenwriter, and producer of film and television who is best known for his distinctive brand of stylized crime drama. His most acclaimed works include the crime films Thief (1981), Manhunter (1986), Heat (1995), and Collateral (2004), the historical drama The Last of the Mohicans (1992), and the docudrama The Insider (1999). He is also known for his role as executive producer on the popular TV series Miami Vice (1984–89), which he later adapted into a 2006 feature film.

For his work, he has received nominations from international organizations and juries, including those at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, Cannes and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Total Film ranked Mann No. 28 on its list of the 100 Greatest Directors Ever, Sight and Sound ranked him No. 5 on their list of the 10 Best Directors of the Last 25 Years, and Entertainment Weekly ranked Mann No. 8 on their 25 Greatest Active Film Directors list.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 British independent comedy film concerning the Arthurian legend, written and performed by the Monty Python comedy group of Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin, and directed by Gilliam and Jones. It was conceived during the hiatus between the third and fourth series of their BBC television series Monty Python's Flying Circus.

In contrast to the group's first film, And Now for Something Completely Different, a compilation of sketches from the first two television series, Holy Grail draws on new material, parodying the legend of King Arthur's quest for the Holy Grail. 30 years later, Idle used the film as the basis for the musical Spamalot.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail grossed more than any British film exhibited in the US in 1975. In the US, it was selected as the second best comedy of all time in the ABC special Best in Film: The Greatest Movies of Our Time. In the UK, readers of Total Film magazine ranked it the fifth greatest comedy film of all time; a similar poll of Channel 4 viewers placed it sixth (2000).

National Lampoon's Vacation

National Lampoon's Vacation, sometimes referred to as Vacation, is a 1983 American road comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and starring Chevy Chase, Beverly D'Angelo, Randy Quaid, Dana Barron, and Anthony Michael Hall. John Candy, Imogene Coca, Christie Brinkley, and a young Jane Krakowski appear in supporting roles. The screenplay was written by John Hughes, based on his short story "Vacation '58" which appeared in National Lampoon.

The film was a box-office hit, earning more than $60 million in the US with an estimated budget of $15 million, and received positive reviews from critics. As a result of its success, four sequels have been produced: European Vacation (1985), Christmas Vacation (1989), Vegas Vacation (1997), and most recently, Vacation (2015) which serves as both a reboot and a continuation. In 2000, readers of Total Film voted it the 46th greatest comedy film of all time. It continues to be a cult film and a staple on cable television.

Scarface (1983 film)

Scarface is a 1983 American crime film directed by Brian De Palma and written by Oliver Stone, a remake of the 1932 film of the same name. The film tells the story of Cuban refugee Tony Montana (Al Pacino) who arrives in 1980s Miami with nothing and rises to become a powerful drug kingpin. The cast also features Michelle Pfeiffer, Steven Bauer, Robert Loggia, F. Murray Abraham and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio.Pacino became interested in a remake of the 1932 version after seeing it and he and producer Martin Bregman begin to develop it. Sidney Lumet was initially hired to direct the film before he was replaced by De Palma, who hired Stone to write the script. Filming took place from November 1982 and concluded in May 1983. The film was shot in Louisville and in Los Angeles. The film's soundtrack was composed by Giorgio Moroder.

Scarface was released on December 9, 1983 and grossed $44 million at the domestic box office and $65.9 million worldwide. Initial critical reception was negative, with criticism over excessive violence and profanity and graphic drug usage. Some Cuban expatriates in Miami objected to the film's portrayal of Cubans as criminals and drug traffickers. In the years that followed, however, the film has received reappraisal from critics, and is now considered by some to be one of the best films in the crime genre. Screenwriters and directors such as Martin Scorsese have praised the film, which has been referenced extensively in pop culture, especially in rap and hip hop music as well as comic books, TV and video games. The film has long since become a cult classic.

Sexy Beast

Sexy Beast is a 2000 crime film directed by Jonathan Glazer and written by Louis Mellis and David Scinto. It stars Ray Winstone, Ben Kingsley and Ian McShane. It follows Gal Dove (Winstone), an ex-convict visited by an aggressive gangster (Kingsley) who demands he accept a heist job.

Kingsley's performance earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. In 2004 the magazine Total Film named Sexy Beast the 15th greatest British film of all time.

The 39 Steps (1935 film)

The 39 Steps is a 1935 British thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll. The film is very loosely based on the 1915 adventure novel The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan. It is about an everyman civilian in London, Richard Hannay, who becomes caught up in preventing an organization of spies called the 39 Steps from stealing British military secrets. After being mistakenly accused of the murder of a counter-espionage agent, Hannay goes on the run to Scotland and becomes tangled up with an attractive woman in the hopes of stopping the spy ring and clearing his name.

The British Film Institute ranked it the fourth best British film of the 20th century. In 2004, Total Film named it the 21st greatest British movie ever made, and in 2011 ranked it the second-best book-to-film adaptation of all time. In 2017 a poll of 150 actors, directors, writers, producers and critics for Time Out magazine saw it ranked the 13th best British film ever.

Filmmaker and actor Orson Welles referred to the film as a "masterpiece". Screenwriter Robert Towne remarked, "It's not much of an exaggeration to say that all contemporary escapist entertainment begins with The 39 Steps."

The Italian Job

The Italian Job is a 1969 British comedy caper film, written by Troy Kennedy Martin, produced by Michael Deeley and directed by Peter Collinson. Subsequent television showings and releases on video have made it well known in the United Kingdom.

Its soundtrack was composed by Quincy Jones, and includes "On Days Like These" sung by Matt Monro over the opening credits, and "Getta Bloomin' Move On" (usually referred to as "The Self-Preservation Society", after its chorus) during the climactic car chase. Lead actor Michael Caine is among its singers.In 1999, it was ranked #36 on the BFI Top 100 British films by the British Film Institute. In November 2004, Total Film named The Italian Job the 27th greatest British film of all time. The line "You're only supposed to blow the bloody doors off!" by Caine was voted favourite film one-liner in a 2003 poll of 1,000 film fans.

The popularity of the film has led to parodies and allusions in other films and productions, including a 2003 remake and inspired a charity event that has taken place annually since 1990 and involves Minis and other vehicles featured in the original film, driving from the UK to northern Italy and back, visiting Grand Prix circuits, historic Italian cities and the locations in Turin featured in the film, while fundraising for children's charities. The event has raised nearly £2,600,000 so far.

There's Something About Mary

There's Something About Mary is a 1998 American romantic comedy film directed by Bobby and Peter Farrelly. It stars Cameron Diaz as the titular character with Matt Dillon, Ben Stiller, Lee Evans and Chris Elliott all playing men who are in love with Mary and vying for her affections.

The film was placed 27th in the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Laughs: America's Funniest Movies, a list of the 100 funniest movies of the 20th century. In 2000, readers of Total Film magazine voted it the fourth-greatest comedy film of all time. Diaz won a New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress, an MTV Movie Award for Best Performance, an American Comedy Award for Best Actress, a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Best Actress. She also received a Golden Globe nomination for her performance. It was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy. It won 4 out of 8 MTV Movie Awards, including Best Movie.

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