Tony Petitti

Tony Petitti is the Chief Operating Officer of Major League Baseball. He succeeded Rob Manfred in the position on January 25, 2015 after Manfred became Commissioner of Baseball. He previously served as the President and Chief Executive Officer of the MLB Network, where he oversaw all of the network's day-to-day operations.

Career

Petitti attended Haverford College where he majored in economics before attending Harvard Law School. He worked for two years at the law firm of Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft before joining ABC Sports in 1988 as general attorney. After being named Vice President of Programming, where he was responsible for acquiring and scheduling ABC Sports programming, he was hired by CBS in 1997 as Senior Vice President of Business Affairs and Programming. In December 2005, Pettiti was named Executive Vice President, CBS Sports and is "responsible for all day-to-day operations of CBS Sports, "[1] where he was largely responsible for the network's NFL coverage. "Basically, I’m responsible for everything you see on Sunday."[2]

It was announced on January 3, 2008, that Mr. Petitti would be placed in charge of day-to-day operations of CSTV, the college sports network that was absorbed into CBS sports, effectively replacing network co-founder Brian Bedol, who had been serving as president of CSTV since the network was purchased by CBS Corporation in 2005. CSTV was renamed the CBS College Sports Network on March 16, 2008 and eventually evolved to become CBS Sports Network.

In April 2008 Pettiti left CBS to become the head of MLB Network, which launched in January 2009.[3]

References

  1. ^ CBS Sports Team: Tony Petitti Archived 2006-01-13 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ THE BALL’S IN HIS COURT: TONY PETITTI '83 ASCENDS TO HIGH POSITION AT CBS SPORTS Archived 2006-10-30 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Tony Petitti named President & CEO of MLB Network
CBS Sports Network

CBS Sports Network is an American pay television network that is owned by the CBS Corporation. When it launched in 2002 as the National College Sports Network (later College Sports Television also known as CSTV), it operated as a multi-platform media brand which also included its primary website, collegesports.com, and a network of websites operated for the athletic departments of 215 colleges and universities.

After CSTV was acquired by CBS in 2008, the network was re-branded as the CBS College Sports Network. The network initially maintained its college sports focus, but in February 2011, the service was re-branded as CBS Sports Network to re-position it as a mainstream sports service. The network continues to have a particular focus on college sports, along with coverage of smaller leagues and events, simulcasts of sports radio shows both the CBS Sports Radio network and Entercom's WFAN (formerly owned outright by CBS), and studio and analysis programming.

As of May 2015, CBS Sports Network is available to approximately 61 million pay television households (52.6% of households with television) in the United States.

Lawrence Woodmere Academy

Lawrence Woodmere Academy, also known as "LWA", and "Woodmere Academy", is an independent school located in Woodmere, New York, United States. It is accredited by the New York State Association of Independent Schools and the New York State Board of Regents.

List of Harvard Law School alumni

This is a list of notable alumni of Harvard Law School.

List of Haverford College people

This List of Haverford College people includes alumni and faculty of Haverford College. Haverford is a smaller college and has a smaller alumni population than its peers. Because expansion occurred in the 1980s, most of Haverford's alumni are still quite young. Despite this, as of 2010, Haverford alumni include five Nobel Prizes, four MacArthur Fellows, 20 Rhodes Scholarships, 10 Marshall Scholarships, nine Henry Luce Fellowships, 56 Watson Fellowships, two George Mitchell Scholarship, two Carnegie Endowment Junior Fellowships, two Churchill Scholars, one Gates Cambridge Scholar, 13 All Americans, and 23 NCAA post-graduate winners.

MLB Network

The MLB Network is an American television sports channel dedicated to baseball. It is primarily owned by Major League Baseball, with AT&T's WarnerMedia News & Sports, Comcast's NBC Sports Group, Charter Communications and Cox Communications having minority ownership.The channel's headquarters and studios are located in the Secaucus, New Jersey facility, which formerly housed MSNBC's studios. MLB Network's studios also house NHL Network, with some studio sharing, which came under the management of MLB Advanced Media in mid-2015 and transferred most operations from the network's former Toronto home base.

Tony Petitti, former executive producer of CBS Sports, was named the network's first president. Petitti served as MLB Network's president until December 2014, when he was appointed as Chief Operating Officer of Major League Baseball. Rob McGlarry, who worked as Senior and later Executive Vice-president of Business Affairs at MLB Network since 2009, was named the network's second president.As of February 2015, MLB Network is available to approximately 69,991,000 pay television households (60.1% of subscription television customers) in the United States.

Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Baseball's first openly all-professional team was founded in Cincinnati in 1869. (There had been teams in the past that paid some players, and some that had paid all players but under the table.) The first few decades of professional baseball were characterized by rivalries between leagues and by players who often jumped from one team or league to another.

The period before 1920 in baseball was known as the dead-ball era; players rarely hit home runs during this time. Baseball survived a conspiracy to fix the 1919 World Series, which came to be known as the Black Sox Scandal. The sport rose in popularity in the 1920s, and survived potential downturns during the Great Depression and World War II. Shortly after the war, Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier.

The 1950s and 1960s were a time of expansion for the AL and NL, then new stadiums and artificial turf surfaces began to change the game in the 1970s and 1980s. Home runs dominated the game during the 1990s, and media reports began to discuss the use of anabolic steroids among Major League players in the mid-2000s. In 2006, an investigation produced the Mitchell Report, which implicated many players in the use of performance-enhancing substances, including at least one player from each team.

Today, MLB is composed of 30 teams: 29 in the United States and 1 in Canada. Teams play 162 games each season and five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903. Baseball broadcasts are aired on television, radio, and the Internet throughout North America and in several other countries throughout the world. MLB has the highest season attendance of any sports league in the world with more than 73 million spectators in 2015.

NFL on CBS

The NFL on CBS is the branding used for broadcasts of National Football League (NFL) games that are produced by CBS Sports, the sports division of the CBS television network in the United States. The network has aired NFL game telecasts since 1956 (with exception of a break from 1994 to 1997). From 2014 to 2017, CBS also broadcast Thursday Night Football games during the first half of the NFL season, through a production partnership with NFL Network.

PGA Tour on CBS

PGA Tour on CBS (or Golf on CBS) is the branding used for broadcasts of the PGA Tour that are produced by CBS Sports, the sports division of the CBS television network in the United States.

Rob Manfred

Robert D. Manfred Jr. (born September 28, 1958) is an American lawyer and business executive who is the tenth and current Commissioner of Baseball. He previously served as the Chief Operating Officer of Major League Baseball (MLB) and succeeded Bud Selig as Commissioner on January 25, 2015.

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