Tony Pacheco

Antonio Aristides Pacheco (August 9, 1927 – March 23, 1987) was a Cuban-born coach and scout in Major League Baseball. A longtime minor league infielder and manager, Pacheco coached in MLB for six seasons (1974; 1976–79; 1982) for the Cleveland Indians and Houston Astros.[1]

Born in Punta Brava (now Havana),[2] Pacheco got his start in American professional baseball in 1949 with the Class D Newport Canners of the Appalachian League, but by 1951 he was a regular second baseman for the Havana Cubanos of the Class B Florida International League, one of the most successful minor league clubs of its day (and provider of a stream of Cuban talent to its parent team, the Washington Senators). Pacheco's playing career would take him back to the United States' mainland after 1953, but he would return to Cuba's capital twice to play (1954), then manage (1958) for the Triple-A Havana Sugar Kings of the International League. As a player, Pacheco batted .236 with 14 home runs in 2,825 at bats over eight seasons. He threw and batted right-handed, stood 6 ft (1.8 m) tall and weighed 185 lb (84 kg).[3]

Pacheco managed in the Cincinnati Reds' farm system in 1958–59 (the Sugar Kings were a Reds' affiliate at that time), scouted for the Reds, then in 1961 became a scout for the expansion Houston Colt .45s (renamed the Astros after 1964). In 1966–73, he resumed his minor league managing career, reaching Triple-A Oklahoma City of the American Association in 1972. He also managed in winter baseball and served as a part-time Houston scout; in October 1967, Pacheco and scouting director Pat Gillick signed César Cedeño to his first professional contract.[4]

In 1973, former Cincinnati farm system director Phil Seghi, now general manager of the Indians, hired Pacheco as manager of the Tribe's Double-A San Antonio Missions farm club, then brought him to Cleveland as a coach on Ken Aspromonte's staff in 1974. Pacheco was not retained when Frank Robinson replaced Aspromonte for 1975 but instead managed the Rookie-level Gulf Coast Indians that season.

But in 1976, Pacheco was appointed a coach with the Astros by their new manager, Bill Virdon, and he would serve through 1979 as the team's first-base coach. He also coached for Houston in 1982 and scouted for them during the early 1980s.

Pacheco died at age 59 in Miami Beach, Florida.

Tony Pacheco
Tony Pacheco - Houston Astros - 1976
Pacheco in 1976
Coach
Born: August 9, 1927
Havana
Died: March 23, 1987 (aged 59)
Miami Beach, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right
Teams

References

  1. ^ http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/P/Ppacht801.htm
  2. ^ Isphording, Bruce (5 August 1975). "Tony Pacheco: Baseball's Bouncing Man to Wear Uniform to Grave". Sarasota Journal. pp. 1–B. Retrieved 8 November 2011.
  3. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/minors/player.cgi?id=pachec002ant
  4. ^ http://www.astrosdaily.com/history/cedeno.htm

External links

1958 Cincinnati Redlegs season

The 1958 Cincinnati Redlegs season consisted of the Redlegs finishing in fourth place in the National League standings with a record of 76–78, 16 games behind the Milwaukee Braves. The Redlegs played their home games at Crosley Field. The season started with Birdie Tebbetts managing the club, but after the Redlegs went 52–61, Tebbetts was replaced in August by Jimmy Dykes, who went 24–17 the rest of the way.

1959 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1959 Cincinnati Reds season consisted of the Reds finishing in a fifth-place tie with the Chicago Cubs in the National League standings, with a record of 74–80, 13 games behind the NL and World Champion Los Angeles Dodgers.

Prior to the season the club, after calling themselves the Cincinnati Redlegs for the past six seasons, changed its nickname back to the Reds. The Reds played their home games at Crosley Field.

1966 Houston Astros season

The 1966 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth in the National League with a record of 72–90, 23 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1967 Houston Astros season

The 1967 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. It involved the 69–93 Astros ninth-place finish in the National League, 32½ games behind the NL and World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals.

1968 Houston Astros season

The 1968 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Astros finishing in tenth place in the National League, with a record of 72–90, 25 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals. The Astros also hosted the 1968 MLB All-Star Game at the Astrodome, with the NL defeating the AL, 1–0.

1970 Houston Astros season

The 1970 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League West with a record of 79–83, 23 games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

1971 Houston Astros season

The 1971 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished tied for fourth in the National League West with a record of 79–83, 11 games behind the San Francisco Giants.

The Astros played 75 games that were decided by a one run margin, which is an all-time MLB record. In those games, the team had a record of 32–43.

1972 Houston Astros season

The 1972 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League West with a record of 84–69, 10½ games behind the Cincinnati Reds and just a percentage point ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1973 Cleveland Indians season

The 1973 Cleveland Indians season was the 73rd in the franchise's history. The club finished in sixth place in the American League East.

1974 Cleveland Indians season

The 1974 Cleveland Indians season was the team's 74th season in Major League Baseball. It involved the Indians competing in the American League East, where they finished fourth with a record of 77–85.

1976 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros 1976 season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League West with a record of 80–82, 22 games behind the first-place Cincinnati Reds.

1977 Houston Astros season

The 1977 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League West with a record of 81–81, 17 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1978 Houston Astros season

The 1978 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League West with a record of 74-88, 21 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1979 Houston Astros season

The 1979 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League West, 1½ games behind the first-place Cincinnati Reds. The 1979 Astros were the last National League franchise in the 20th century to hit more triples than home runs. The club had 52 triples compared to 49 home runs.

Arizona League Indians

The Arizona League Indians, formerly the Gulf Coast League (GCL) Indians, are a minor league baseball team in Goodyear, Arizona. They are a Rookie-level team in the Arizona League that began play as a Cleveland Indians affiliate in the summer of 2009. The AZL Indians play home games at Goodyear Ballpark.

With the announcement of the big league club moving their spring training headquarters from Winter Haven, Florida to Goodyear, Arizona beginning in 2009, the former GCL Indians headed to the Arizona League for the 2009 season.

As of the 2019 season, the Indians operate two Arizona League clubs: AZL Indians 1 (designated the "Red" squad) and AZL Indians 2 (designated the "Blue" squad).

Covington Astros

The Covington Astros were a minor league baseball team that played from 1967 to 1976 in the Appalachian League. Affiliated with the Houston Astros, they were located in Covington, Virginia. They played their home games at Casey Field.

Dave Bristol

James David Bristol (born June 23, 1933) is an American former manager in Major League Baseball in the 1960s and 1970s. He managed the Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Brewers, Atlanta Braves, and San Francisco Giants during this period.

Punta Brava

Punta Brava is a small town and suburban ward (consejo popular) of Havana, Cuba, part of the municipio of La Lisa. It is located to the southwest of Havana, with a population of roughly 1500 inhabitants. It has been the site of different military encounters during Cuba's struggle for independence, and is most notable as the site where Cuban General Antonio Maceo Grajales was killed by Spanish troops in 1896. In the early 20th century, Punta Brava was known for its bee keeping and honey.

Tony Pacheco (rugby)

Tony Pacheco is the head coach for the Central Washington University rugby team. CWU competes annually in the Varsity Cup.

Before he entered coaching, Pacheco played rugby for the US under-19 national team, Kentwood Rugby Club, and the Olympic Club.Pacheco served as an assistant coach at Old Puget Sound Beach.

Pacheco is head coach at Central Washington University. CWU has had a successful program in rugby sevens, routinely qualifying for the USA Rugby Sevens National Championship. Central Washington has also been successful in rugby fifteens, with CWU finishing the 2013 season ranked sixth in the nation.

Pacheco's success as coach led to Central Washington University promoting its rugby program from club status to varsity status in 2014.Pacheco also serves as head coach for the U.S. men's collegiate All-American sevens team. The collegiate All-American sevens team is an important development pathway for the United States national rugby sevens team and for the USA Rugby Olympic Development Program.

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