Tom Schoen

Thomas Ralph Schoen (born January 30, 1946) is a former American football defensive back who played one season with the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Browns in the eighth round of the 1968 NFL Draft. He played college football at the University of Notre Dame, where he was a Consensus All-American in 1967.

Tom Schoen
refer to caption
Schoen from 1968 Dome
No. 33
Position:Defensive back
Personal information
Born:January 30, 1946 (age 73)
Cleveland, Ohio
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High school:Cleveland (OH) St. Joseph
College:Notre Dame
NFL Draft:1968 / Round: 8 / Pick: 212
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Schoen played quarterback at St. Joseph High School in Cleveland, Ohio and led the team to a 9–0–1 record his senior year, earning All-Ohio honors.[1][2]

College career

Schoen joined Notre Dame as a quarterback before being converted to safety his junior and senior seasons. He was a Consensus All-American in 1967.[1][3][4]

Professional career

Schoen was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the eighth round, with the 212th pick, of the 1968 NFL Draft.[5] He did not play until 1970 because of military service.[1]

While in the military as quarterback Schoen led the 7th Infantry Division football team to an undefeated 8th Army championship. [6]

Coaching career

Schoen returned to St. Joseph High School to become assistant football coach in 1988. He was named head coach in 1995 and became the school's athletic director in 1998.[1][7]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Tom Schoen". clevelandsportshall.com. Retrieved 17 August 2014.
  2. ^ "TOM SCHOEN". profootballarchives.com. Archived from the original on 19 August 2014. Retrieved 17 August 2014.
  3. ^ "Tom Schoen". und.com. Retrieved 17 August 2014.
  4. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 6. Retrieved August 16, 2014.
  5. ^ "1968 NFL/AFL Draft". pro-football-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 17 August 2014.
  6. ^ W.McDaniel All 8th Army teammate
  7. ^ Podolski, Mark (November 4, 2011). "Former VASJ coach Tom Schoen knows 1 vs. 2 in college football". news-herald.com. Retrieved 17 August 2014.

External links

1965 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1965 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1965 NCAA University Division football season.

1966 College Football All-America Team

The 1966 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1966.

The NCAA recognizes six selectors as "official" for the 1966 season. They are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Central Press Association (CP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (6) the United Press International (UPI). Four of the six teams (AP, UPI, NEA, and FWAA) were selected by polling of sports writers and/or broadcasters. The Central Press team was selected with input from the captains of the major college teams. The AFCA team was based on a poll of coaches. Other notable selectors, though not recognized by the NCAA as official, included Time magazine, The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF).The undefeated Notre Dame and Michigan State teams finished the season ranked #1 and #2, played to a 10-10 tie in the 1966 Notre Dame vs. Michigan State football game, and dominated the 1966 All-America selections. Notre Dame had six players who received first-team honors: guard Tom Regner (AFCA, AP, CP, NEA, UPI, Time, TSN, WCFF); back Nick Eddy (AFCA, AP, CP, FWAA, NEA, UPI, WCFF); defensive end Alan Page (CP, FWAA, NEA, Time, TSN, WCFF); linebacker Jim Lynch (AFCA, AP, CP, FWAA, NEA, UPI, Time, TSN, WCFF); and defensive tackles Pete Duranko (AFCA, UPI) and Kevin Hardy (Time, TSN). Michigan State had five: defensive end Bubba Smith (AFCA, AP, CP, FWAA, NEA, UPI, Time, TSN, WCFF); offensive end Gene Washington (AFCA, UPI, Time, TSN); running back Clint Jones (AP, CP, NEA, Time, TSN, WCFF); defensive back/linebacker George Webster (AFCA, AP, CP, FWAA, NEA, UPI, Time, TSN, WCFF); and tackle Jerry West (NEA).

1966 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1966 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1966 NCAA University Division football season. The Irish, coached by Ara Parseghian, ended the season undefeated with nine wins and one tie, winning a national championship. The Fighting Irish earned a consensus title after beating No. 10 Oklahoma 38–0 in Norman, tying unbeaten and No. 2 Michigan State 10–10, and ending the season defeating No. 10 USC, 51–0, in the Coliseum The 1966 squad became the eighth Irish team to win the national title and the first under Parseghian. The Irish outscored its opponents 362–38. The 10–10 tie between The Spartans and the Irish remains one of the controversial games of college football, and is considered today to be one of the great "games of the century".

1967 College Football All-America Team

The 1967 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1967.

The NCAA recognizes six selectors as "official" for the 1967 season. They are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Central Press Association (CP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (6) the United Press International (UPI). Four of the six teams (AP, UPI, NEA, and FWAA) were selected by polling of sports writers and/or broadcasters. The Central Press team was selected with input from the captains of the major college teams. The AFCA team was based on a poll of coaches. Other notable selectors, though not recognized by the NCAA as official, included Time magazine, The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF).

1967 NCAA University Division football season

The 1967 NCAA University Division football season was the last one in which college football's champion was crowned before the bowl games. During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A and now as the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision.

Prior to the start of the 1967 season, Idaho was demoted from the University Division to the College Division.The NCAA Football Guide, however, did note an "unofficial national champion" based on the top ranked teams in the "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The "writers' poll" by Associated Press (AP) was the most popular, followed by the "coaches' poll" by United Press International (UPI). In 1967, both AP and UPI issued their final polls at the close of the regular season, but before teams competed in bowl games. The Associated Press presented the "AP Trophy" to the winner.

The AP poll in 1967 consisted of the votes of many sportswriters, though not all of them voted in every poll. Those who cast votes would give their opinion of the ten best teams. Under a point system of 10 points for first place, 9 for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined.

1968 Cleveland Browns season

The 1968 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 19th season with the National Football League.

The Browns made it to the playoffs for the 2nd straight year thanks to an 8-game winning streak and the brilliant play of quarterback Bill Nelsen who replaced Frank Ryan as the starting quarterback prior to week 4 of their season.

1968 NFL/AFL Draft

The 1968 National Football League draft was part of the common draft, in the second year in which the NFL and AFL held a joint draft of college players. It took place at the Belmont Plaza Hotel in New York City on January 30–31, 1968.This was the last draft until 1980 in which the Washington Redskins exercised their first-round pick. Most of them were traded away by coach George Allen between 1971 and 1977 due to Allen's well-known preference for veteran players over rookies.

1970 Cleveland Browns season

The 1970 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 21st season with the National Football League. The Browns attempted to improve on its 10-3-1 record from 1969. The team would fail to do so, and they finished with an even 7-7 record and missed the postseason. This was the first season that the Browns would play the Cincinnati Bengals, their new arch-rival in the AFC Central. The 2 teams split their 2 meetings in the first season series.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish starting quarterbacks

The following individuals have started games at quarterback for the University of Notre Dame football team, updated through the 2018 season.

The year of induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, if applicable, is designated alongside the respective player's final season.

List of University of Notre Dame athletes

This list of University of Notre Dame athletes includes graduates, non-graduate former students, and current students of Notre Dame who are notable for their achievements within athletics, sometimes before or after their time at Notre Dame. Other alumni can be found in the list of University of Notre Dame alumni.

Although Notre Dame is highly ranked academically, it has also been called a "jock school" as it has produced a large number of athletes. Intercollegiate sports teams at Notre Dame are called the "Fighting Irish". Notre Dame offers 13 varsity sports for both men and women: Men's American Football, Men's Baseball, Men's and Women's Basketball, Men's and Women's Cross Country, Men's and Women's Fencing, Men's and Women's Golf, Men's Ice Hockey, Men's and Women's Lacrosse, Women's Rowing, Men's and Women's Soccer, Women's Softball, Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving, Men's and Women's Tennis, Men's and Women's Track and Field, and Women's Volleyball. Approximately 400 students have gone on to play professional American football in the National Football League, the American Football League, or the All-America Football Conference, with many others going to play other sports professionally. Some athletes have also participated in the Olympic Games.

List of people from Cleveland

The people listed below were all born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with the city of Cleveland, Ohio.

Notre Dame Fighting Irish football statistical leaders

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Fighting Irish represent the University of Notre Dame as an Independent in the NCAA.

Although Notre Dame began competing in intercollegiate football in 1887, records from the early years are often incomplete and inconsistent and may not appear on this list. Notre Dame's official record book does not list a specific "modern era" beginning in a certain year, and the records listed below can go as far back as 1900, although they may not be complete.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1940s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Fighting Irish have played in 11 bowl games since then, allowing more recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Notre Dame–USC football rivalry

The Notre Dame–USC football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team of the University of Notre Dame and USC Trojans football team of the University of Southern California, customarily on the Saturday following Thanksgiving Day when the game is played in Los Angeles or on the third Saturday of October when the game is played in South Bend.

Notre Dame and USC have traditionally been counted among the elite programs in college football, with the schools having won a combined 22 national championships and 14 Heisman Trophies. This football rivalry, which began in 1926, is considered one of the most important in college football, and is often called the greatest intersectional rivalry in college football. The rivalry game has been played every year from 1926 to the present, with the exception of three seasons, 1943-1945, during the World War II years. Accordingly, it is one of the longest-running rivalries in college football.

Several times, the winner of this series has gone on to win or play for the college football national title. Both schools claim 11 national titles while the NCAA recognizes 13 Notre Dame championships and 9 USC championships. Moreover, both schools are acclaimed for their All-Americans (101 for Notre Dame and 80 for USC), College Football Hall of Famers (52 from Notre Dame and 35 from USC), and Pro Football Hall of Famers (13 from Notre Dame and 12 from USC). The rivals account for the highest numbers of players taken in the NFL Draft of any school; USC has had 502 players taken and Notre Dame has had 495. No rivalry in college football accounts for as many combined honours.

The teams play for the Jeweled Shillelagh, a trophy that goes home with the winning team each year. Notre Dame leads the series 47–37–5. Despite many close games, the series has seen dominant runs by both side: USC went 12–2–2 from 1967 through 1982, Notre Dame went undefeated (11–0–1) from 1983 through 1995, and USC went undefeated (8–0) from 2002 through 2009. However, while Notre Dame and USC have defeated the other in landmark games enabling one of them to move onto a national title, the two teams have also played spoiler to each other several times:

Notre Dame – #1 undefeated Notre Dame beat #2 undefeated USC in the Coliseum en route to the national title in 1988. The Irish also spoiled Trojan title campaigns by giving them their first loss in the last game of the season in 1947 and 1952, as well as handing them a first loss in 1927, 1973 and 1995. They also tied #1 ranked USC in 1968, 21–21, knocking them down to #2 behind Ohio State (who then beat USC in a 1 vs. 2 matchup in the Rose Bowl). The Irish tied the Trojans again in 1969, 14–14, the only blemish in USC's 10–0–1 season.USC – Spoiled legitimate Irish title hopes in 1938, 1964, 1970, 1980, and tying them in 1948 (after Michigan already had been voted #1 by AP). Each game came in the final week of the season. USC also spoiled Irish campaigns in 1931 and 1971.Notre Dame leads the series on the field, 46–36–5.

Schoen

Schoen is a common surname of German origin. People with the surname include:

Alan Schoen (b. 1924), US physicist

Christian Schoen (b. 1970), German art historian

Craig Schoen (b. 1983), US athlete in basketball

Cristie Schoen (1976-2015), Spanish-born US chef

Dan Schoen (b. 1974), US political figure

Douglas Schoen (b. 1953), US political commentator

Edgar Schoen (b. ca. 1925), US physician

Gaili Schoen (b. ca. 1970), US musician

Gerry Schoen (b. 1947), US athlete in baseball

Harold Schoen (b.ca. 1941), US educator

Herbert Schoen (1929-2014), German athlete in football

John W. Schoen (b. 1952), US radio personality

Karl John Schoen (1894-1918), US aviator, war hero

Lawrence M. Schoen (b. 1959), US author, psychologist

Max Schoen (1888-1959), US music educator

Richard Schoen (b. 1950), US mathematician

Seth Schoen (b. 1979), US computer authority

Thomas Schoen, Abbot of Bornem Abbey.

Tom Schoen (b. 1946), US athlete in football

Vic Schoen (1916-2000), US musician

Wilhelm von Schoen (1851-1933), German diplomat

Villa Angela-St. Joseph High School

Villa Angela-St. Joseph High School is a private Roman Catholic college-preparatory high school located in Cleveland, Ohio. The school's name is commonly abbreviated VASJ. It was formed by the 1990 merger of Villa Angela Academy (all girls) and St. Joseph High School (all boys). It is owned by the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland. The school's core values are grounded in those of the religious orders which had administered the two predecessor schools: the Society of Mary (Marianists) (Saint Joseph High School) and the Ursulines (Villa Angela Academy).

Offense
Defense

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