Tom Mack

Thomas Lee Mack (born November 1, 1943) is a former American football player. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1999.

A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Mack played college football at the end and tackle positions for the University of Michigan from 1963 to 1965. He was a starter on the 1964 Michigan team that won the Big Ten Conference championship and defeated Oregon State in the 1965 Rose Bowl. He was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten player in 1965 and was inducted into the University of Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor in 2006.

Mack was selected by the Los Angeles Rams with the second pick in the 1966 NFL Draft and played at the left guard position for the Rams for 13 seasons from 1966 to 1978. During his NFL career, Mack played in 11 Pro Bowls and appeared in 184 consecutive games, 162 as a starter, over 13 seasons.

Tom Mack
refer to caption
Mack from the 1966 Michiganensian
No. 65
Position:Offensive guard, offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:November 1, 1943 (age 75)
Cleveland, Ohio
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:250 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school:Cleveland Heights
(Cleveland Heights, Ohio)
College:Michigan
NFL Draft:1966 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:184
Games started:162
Fumble recoveries:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Mack was born in 1943 in Cleveland, Ohio, and attended Cleveland Heights High School.[1] He was the son of Ray Mack, a Cleveland native who played Major League Baseball as a second baseman from 1938 to 1947, including eight seasons with the Cleveland Indians.[2] Mack became an Eagle Scout in 1960, and he later became a recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award.[3]

University of Michigan

Mack enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1962 and played college football for Michigan Wolverines football teams from 1963 to 1965.[4] As a sophomore in 1963, he played at the end position and spent most of the season on the bench.[4][5] After the 1963 season, Mack switched to the tackle position at the suggestion of Michigan coach Bump Elliott. Mack later referred to the position change as "the big break of my life," an opportunity that "turned my whole experience in terms of football around."[5]

As a junior, he started seven games at right tackle and won the Meyer Morton Award for the 1964 Michigan Wolverines football team that compiled a 9-1 record, outscored opponents 235-83, and defeated Oregon State in the 1965 Rose Bowl.[6] As a senior, he started seven games at right tackle for the 1965 Michigan team,[7] and he was selected by the Associated Press as a first-team tackle on the 1965 All-Big Ten Conference football team.[8] Mack was inducted into the University of Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor in 2006.[9]

While attending Michigan, Mack was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity.[10]

Los Angeles Rams

Mack was selected by the Los Angeles Rams in the first round, as the second overall pick, in the 1966 NFL Draft.[1][11] During Mack's rookie season with the Rams, starter Don Chuy was injured during the fifth game of the season, allowing Mack to move into the lineup.[12] He started eight games during the 1966 season and became a fixture for the Rams at the left guard position for the next 13 seasons.[1] During his NFL career, Mack never missed a game due to injury, appearing in 184 consecutive contests, the third longest streak in Rams history behind Merlin Olsen and Jack Youngblood.[13]

During Mack's career with the Rams, the club enjoyed a .720 winning percentage with a won-lost-tie record of 129-48-7, won their division eight times (1967, 1969, and 1973-1978), and reached four NFC championship games. In 1973, the Rams scored led the NFL with 388 points (27.7 points/game). In 1974, the Rams lost to the Minnesota Vikings by four points in the 1974 NFC Championship Game, with a controversial penalty call against Mack costing the Rams a touchdown. The Rams had the ball at the one-yard line on second down when the Vikings' Alan Page made contact with Mack; the referee called illegal procedure on Mack, but replays showed that Mack had not moved. After the game, Mack insisted he had not moved but credited Page with "a smart play" in making contact since a penalty, if called against the Vikings, would have been meaningless.[14][15]

Mack was selected to 11 Pro Bowls, the first coming after his second season in 1967. He missed only one Pro Bowl appearance the rest of his career (1976). Mack's 11 invitations earned him a third-place tie with Bob Lilly and Ken Houston for the most selections of all time. Mack was selected first-team All-Pro four times (1969, 1971, 1973, 1974) and second-team All-Pro four times (1968, 1970, 1972, and 1975). In addition he was named All-NFC eight times between 1970 and 1978.[1]

Mack announced in late November 1978 that he would retire at the end of the 1978 NFL season.[16] He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1999.[17]

Later years

After retiring from football, Mack worked as an engineer, using the engineering degree he received at the University of Michigan.[5] He eventually became a lobbyist for Bechtel Group, Inc.[18]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Tom Mack". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  2. ^ "Ray Mack". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  3. ^ "Distinguished Eagle Scouts" (PDF). Scouting.org. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  4. ^ a b "All-Time Football Roster Database". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  5. ^ a b c Anthony Broome (October 18, 2012). "TBHR Chats With NFL Hall of Famer Tom Mack". The Big House Reports.
  6. ^ "1964 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  7. ^ "1965 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  8. ^ "Grabowski Big Ten Choice". Cape Girardeau Southeast Missourian. November 24, 1965. p. 3B.
  9. ^ Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor. Bentley Historical Library (archives of the University of Michigan and the Michigan Athletic Department) website. Retrieved September 9, 2011.
  10. ^ "Fraternity Men in the Pro Football Hall of Fame" (PDF). North American Inter-Fraternity Conference. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  11. ^ "Mack To Rams". Ocala Star-Banner. November 28, 1965. p. 24.
  12. ^ "It Was a Bruiser For Rams Tom Mack". Lewiston Evening Journal (AP story). October 13, 1966. p. 26.
  13. ^ "Tom Mack". Times Daily. August 6, 1999. p. 10E.
  14. ^ "'I Didn't Move,' Claims Rams' Tom Mack". Sarasota Journal. December 30, 1974. p. 2C.
  15. ^ "Tears Fall As Vikes Top LA, 14-10". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. December 30, 1974. p. 14.
  16. ^ "Veteran Lineman Tom Mack Announces His Retirement". The Pittsburgh Press. November 25, 1978. p. A-10.
  17. ^ "Michigan alum Mack inducted into Pro Football Hall of Fame". The Michigan Daily. August 9, 1999. p. 14.
  18. ^ Gene Wojciechowski (December 7, 1987). "Tom Mack: Once a Force in Rams' Offensive Line, Now He's a Lobbyist Who Reasons". Los Angeles Times.

External links

1964 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1964 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1964 Big Ten Conference football season. In its sixth year under head coach Bump Elliott, Michigan compiled a 9–1 record, won the Big Ten Conference championship for the first time since 1950, and defeated Oregon State in the 1965 Rose Bowl by a score of 34–7. The 1964 Wolverines defeated four teams ranked in the Top 10 in the AP Poll by a combined score of 82 to 17 and finished the regular season ranked No. 4 in both the AP and Coaches' polls. Although no post-bowl polls were taken in the 1964 season, Oregon State coach Tommy Prothro opined after watching game film from the Rose Bowl that the 1964 Wolverines were "the greatest football team he has ever seen."On offense, Michigan scored 235 points, an average of 23.5 points per game, and averaged 349 yards of total offense per game. The offense was led by quarterback Bob Timberlake who was selected as a first-team All-American. Timberlake was a triple threat who rushed for 631 yards, passed for 884 yards, and also handled field goals and extra points. The 1964 team had a strong running game with Mel Anthony and Carl Ward in the backfield. Totaling 2,473 rushing yards for the season, the Wolverines had four games (Air Force, Minnesota, Northwestern, and Oregon State) in which they rushed for over 300 yards.On defense, Michigan had three shutouts (a feat not accomplished by a Michigan team since 1948) and gave up only 83 points, an average of 8.3 points per game. Team leaders on defense included All-American defensive tackle Bill Yearby, All-Big Ten linebacker Tom Cecchini, and team captain and All-Big Ten player Jim Conley. The 1964 team also included at least 16 players who went on to play professional football, including offensive guard Tom Mack (13 years in the NFL, 11 Pro Bowl appearances), defensive back Rick Volk (12 years in the NFL, three Pro Bowl appearances), linebacker Frank Nunley (10 years in the NFL), linebacker Bill Laskey (10 years in the AFL/NFL), and defensive back John Rowser (10 years in the NFL).

The Wolverines narrowly missed an undefeated season, with their only loss coming against a Purdue team led by Bob Griese by a score of 21–20. Michigan had a chance to tie the game in the fourth quarter, but Timberlake carried the ball for an attempted two-point conversion and was stopped short of the goal line.

1965 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1965 Big Ten Conference football season was the 70th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1965 NCAA University Division football season.

1965 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1965 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1965 Big Ten Conference football season. In its seventh year under head coach Bump Elliott, Michigan compiled a 4–6 record (2–5 against conference opponents), finished in seventh place in the Big Ten, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 185 to 161.Linebacker Tom Cecchini was the team captain, and defensive tackle Bill Yearby received the team's most valuable player award. Yearby was also a consensus first-team All-American. Four Michigan players received first-team All-Big Ten honors: Yearby, running back Carl Ward, offensive tackle Tom Mack, and defensive back Rich Volk.The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Wally Gabler with 825 passing yards and 42 points scored, Carl Ward with 639 rushing yards, and right end Jack Clancy with 762 receiving yards.

1969 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1969 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 32nd year with the National Football League and the 24th season in Los Angeles.

1970 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1970. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the consensus All-Pro team for 1970.

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

1973 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1973. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1973.

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1975 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1975. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1975.

1977 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1977 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 40th year with the National Football League and the 32nd season in Los Angeles.

Hobbled by chronic knee woes, quarterback Joe Namath was waived by the New York Jets after the 1976 season, after they were unable to trade him. Namath signed with the L.A. Rams in May 1977. Hope of a Rams revival sprung when Los Angeles won two of their first three games, but Namath was hampered by low mobility. After a poor performance in a Monday Night loss to the Bears, Namath never saw NFL game action again.After a home playoff loss to the Minnesota Vikings 14-7 on a saturated field in game which has been termed the "Mud Bowl", Rams head coach Chuck Knox was fired due to ownership's frustration that Knox had not been able to reach the Super Bowl.

Basie Straight Ahead

Basie Straight Ahead is an album recorded at TTG Studios, Hollywood, California in October 1968 featuring Count Basie and his orchestra. This album marked the first collaboration between Basie and his long-time orchestrator, Sammy Nestico, who composed, arranged and conducted all of the songs on the record. The engineers were Ami Hadani and Thorne Nogar, and the producers were Tom Mack and Teddy Reig. The disc was issued in 1968 on Dot label and on English EMI.

Charley Cowan

Charles Edward Cowan (June 19, 1938 in Braeholm, West Virginia – April 29, 1998 in Los Angeles, California) was an American football offensive tackle who played fifteen seasons in the National Football League with the Los Angeles Rams from 1961 to 1975. Cowan was a huge intimidating presence on the left of Tom Mack, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, from 1966 to 1975, forming a potent left side of the offensive line, with help from Ken Iman at center from 1965 to 1975. In that 1961 to 1975 span, the Rams made the playoffs 5 times (1967,1969,1973,1974,1975), reaching the NFC championship game of the 1974-75 NFL playoffs and the 1975-76 NFL playoffs, but losing to the Minnesota Vikings and to the Dallas Cowboys, respectively. In the 1974 divisional round, the Rams defeated the Washington Redskins, as Cowan was successful against the opposing the right defensive end Verlon Biggs. In the 1975 divisional round, Doug France started in his place as the Rams defeated the St. Louis Cardinals. Cowan came back to play against the Cowboys, his final game, as the Rams could not get past them. Cowan was replaced by Doug France in 1976.

Hank Cicalo

Hank Cicalo (born June 25, 1932) is an American recording engineer whose career has spanned over fifty years. Among the artists recorded by Cicalo are The Monkees, Carole King, Barbra Streisand, and George Harrison.

History of Michigan Wolverines football in the Elliott years

The History of Michigan Wolverines football in the Elliott years covers the history of the University of Michigan Wolverines football program during the period from the promotion of Bump Elliott as head coach in 1959 through his resignation after the 1968 season. Michigan was a member of the Big Ten Conference and played its home games at Michigan Stadium during the Elliott years. During the 10 years in which Elliott served as head football coach, Michigan compiled a record of 51–42–2 (.547) and claimed one Big Ten championship, one Rose Bowl victory, and two Chicago Tribune Silver Football awards for the most valuable player in the Big Ten. However, the Wolverines finished higher than third place in the Big Ten only twice.

The 1964 team compiled a 9–1 record, won the Big Ten championship, defeated Oregon State in the 1965 Rose Bowl, and finished the season ranked No. 4 in both the AP and UPI polls. Quarterback Bob Timberlake was selected as an All-American and won the 1964 Chicago Tribune Silver Football award. After losing to Michigan by a 34–7 score in the Rose Bowl, Oregon State coach Tommy Prothro opined that the 1964 Wolverines were "the greatest football team he has ever seen."In Elliott's final year as head coach, the 1968 team compiled an 8–2 record (6–1 Big Ten) and was ranked No. 12 in the final AP Poll. Running back Ron Johnson won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football award and broke Michigan's single-game and single-season rushing records. Johnson's 347-yard rushing performance against Wisconsin still stands as Michigan's single-game record. The 1968 team also included a core of young players who became stars in the early years of the Schembechler era.

Four Michigan football players from the Elliott years have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. They are Tom Curtis (halfback and defensive back, 1967–1969), Dan Dierdorf (offensive tackle, 1968–1970), Ron Johnson (halfback, 1966–1968), and Jim Mandich (tight end, 1967–1969). Dierdorf and a fifth player, Tom Mack (tackle, 1963–1965), have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. A sixth, Dave Raimey (halfback, 1960–1962), has been inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Ken Iman

Kenneth Charles Iman (February 8, 1939 – November 13, 2010) was an American football center who played 15 seasons in the National Football League (NFL) with the Green Bay Packers and the Los Angeles Rams, from 1961 to 1975.

List of Los Angeles Rams first-round draft picks

The Los Angeles Rams, a professional American football team based in Los Angeles, joined the National Football League (NFL) as Cleveland Rams in 1937. The Rams began playing in 1936 as a charter member of the second American Football League. Although the NFL granted membership to the same owner, the NFL considers it a separate entity. In 1946, Rams' owner Dan Reeves, fed up with poor attendance at Cleveland Stadium, moved the Rams to Los Angeles, and the team played there from 1946 to 1979. Before his death in 1979, later Rams owner Carroll Rosenbloom planned a move within the Los Angeles metropolitan area to Anaheim, using the venue now known as Angel Stadium, and his widow and successor Georgia Frontiere went through with the move in 1980, with the team still officially representing Los Angeles. The Rams moved to St. Louis in 1995 and renamed the team St. Louis Rams. In January 2016, the Rams and the NFL announced that the team would return to Los Angeles. The team now plays in its original L.A. venue, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, while awaiting the 2020 opening of its new stadium in suburban Inglewood.The Rams first participated in the 1938 NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting, more commonly known as the NFL Draft. The Rams did have a 1937 pick, but it was picked by the NFL for an expansion team and later the Rams were later admitted into the league before the 1937 season. Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second–worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.The Rams' first selection as an NFL team was Johnny Drake, a fullback from Purdue in 1937. The Rams have selected the number one overall five times, drafting Corbett Davis in 1938, Billy Cannon in 1960, Terry Baker in 1963, Orlando Pace in 1997, and Sam Bradford in 2010 The Rams have drafted second overall seven times and the third overall two times. Five eventual Hall of Famers were selected by the Rams: Elroy "Crazylegs" Hirsch, Merlin Olsen, Tom Mack, Jack Youngblood, and Eric Dickerson. The team's most recent first round selections are Greg Robinson, an offensive tackle from Auburn, Aaron Donald, a defensive tackle from Pittsburgh, Todd Gurley, a running back from Georgia, and Jared Goff, a quarterback from California.

Los Angeles Rams awards

This page details awards won by the Los Angeles Rams American football team. The Rams were formerly based in St. Louis (1995–2015) and Cleveland (1936–1942, 1944–1945), as well as Los Angeles (1946–1994, 2016–present).

RBBS-PC

RBBS-PC (acronym for Remote Bulletin Board System for the Personal Computer) was a public domain, open-source BBS software program. It was written entirely in BASIC by a large team of people, starting with Russell Lane and then later enhanced by Tom Mack and including Ken Goosens and others.

It supported messaging conferences, questionnaires, doors (through the DORINFO1.DEF dropfile), and much more.

Tom Mack – awards and honors

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