Tom Lovat

Thomas Lovat (born December 28, 1938) is an American former gridiron football coach.

Lovat started coaching at his alma mater Utah as the defensive line coach in 1967. Next he went to Idaho State University (1968–70) and worked with the defensive secondary and offensive line. Then Lovat moved on to the Canadian Football League (CFL) as the defensive coordinator for the Saskatchewan Roughriders (1971), and then went back to Utah as an assistant in 1972 under Bill Meek,[1] was promoted to head coach in 1974,[2] and lasted three seasons.[3]

Next Lovat coached offensive line at Stanford University from 1977 to 1979 under Bill Walsh. Then he moved up to the National Football League (NFL), hired by Bart Starr of the Green Bay Packers as the assistant offensive line coach in 1980, and then to St. Louis Cardinals under Jim Hanifan from 1981 to 1984, as line coach. Then he coached the Indianapolis Colts from 1985 to 1988; and back to the Cardinals when the team moved to Phoenix, coaching under Joe Bugel, as his line coach from 1990 to 1991. Then he was hired by new head coach Mike Holmgren with the Packers in 1992,[3] moved with him to the Seattle Seahawks in 1999, and retired after the 2003 season at age 65.

His son, Mark Lovat, is the current strength and conditioning coordinator for the Packers.

Tom Lovat
Biographical details
BornDecember 28, 1938 (age 80)
Bingham, Utah
Playing career
1958–1960Utah
Position(s)Guard, linebacker
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1967Utah (DL)
1968–1970Idaho State (OL)
1971Saskatchewan Roughriders (DC)
1972–1973Utah (assistant)
1974–1976Utah
1977–1979Stanford (OL)
1980Green Bay Packers (asst. OL)
1981–1984St. Louis Cardinals (OL)
1985–1988Indianapolis Colts (OL)
1990–1991Phoenix Cardinals (OL)
1992–1998Green Bay Packers (OL)
1999–2003Seattle Seahawks (OL)
2007Cologne Centurions (OL)
Head coaching record
Overall5–28

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Utah Utes (Western Athletic Conference) (1974–1976)
1974 Utah 1–10 1–5 7th
1975 Utah 1–10 1–4 6th
1976 Utah 3–8 3–3 4th
Utah: 5–28 5–12
Total: 5–28

Source:[4]

References

  1. ^ Ferguson, George (January 25, 1974). "Lovat, Riehlman top Ute list". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. D1.
  2. ^ "Lovat gets Utah's grid post". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). January 26, 1974. p. 6A.
  3. ^ a b Rock, Brad (January 24, 1997). "Lovat, like U. football, moved to better days". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. D1.
  4. ^ "Tom Lovat Records by Year". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2009-10-21.
1973 Utah Utes football team

The 1973 Utah Utes football team was an American football team that represented the University of Utah during the 1973 NCAA Division I football season. In his sixth and final season as head coach, Bill Meek led the Utes to a 4–2 mark in the WAC and 7–5 overall.

Five weeks after the season ended, Meek resigned in early January 1974. Defensive line coach Tom Lovat, a 35-year-old alumnus from Bingham, was retained for the interim for recruiting continuation, and was promoted later that month.

1974 Utah Utes football team

The 1974 Utah Utes football team was an American football team that represented the University of Utah during the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. First-year head coach Tom Lovat led the Utes to a 1–5 mark in the WAC and 1–10 overall.

1975 Utah Utes football team

The 1975 Utah Utes football team was an American football team that represented the University of Utah during the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. Head coach Tom Lovat led the team to a 1–4 mark in the WAC and 1–10 overall.

1976 Utah Utes football team

The 1976 Utah Utes football team was an American football team that represented the University of Utah during the 1976 NCAA Division I football season. In his third and final season as head coach, Tom Lovat led the Utes to a 3–3 mark in the WAC and 3–8 overall.

1980 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1980 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 61st season the team was in the league. The team matched their previous output of 5–11. The team failed to reach the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

1981 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1981 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 62nd season the franchise was in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 5–11, winning seven games. Despite the improvement the team failed – for the sixth consecutive season – to reach the playoffs.

1983 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1983 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 64th season the team was in the National Football League. The Cardinals won eight games, including victories over both participants in that year's AFC Championship Game, the Raiders and Seahawks. However, the team also lost in meetings over both participants of the 1983 NFC Championship Game, the 49ers and the Redskins. Despite their winning record, the team failed to reach the playoffs.

The Cardinals had a winning record, despite being outscored by a total of 54 points during the regular season. In fact, St. Louis’ 428 points surrendered was, to that point, the most points given up by a team with a winning record in NFL history; it is still second-most all time.

1984 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1984 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 65th year with the National Football League and the 25th season in St. Louis. Despite finishing with the same 9–7 record as their division rivals Dallas and New York, the Giants made the playoffs based upon the best head-to-head record among the three teams.The Cardinals’ 6,345 offensive yards in 1984 was third in the NFL, and the most in team history. Their 423 points were fourth-best in the league.

1985 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1985 Indianapolis Colts season was the 33rd season for the team in the National Football League (NFL) and second in Indianapolis. The Colts finished the year with a record of 5 wins and 11 losses, and fourth in the AFC East division. The Colts did improve on their 4-12 record from 1984, but missed the playoffs for the 8th straight season. This season was rather sluggish, as the Colts for most of the season alternated wins and losses. After starting out mediocre at 3-5, the Colts would then lose 6 straight to sit at 3-11 before winning their last 2 games to finish 5-11. This would be the only full season for head coach Rod Dowhower, as he was fired 13 games into the following season.

1986 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1986 Indianapolis Colts season was the 34th season for the team in the National Football League (NFL) and third in Indianapolis. The team finished the year with a record of 3 wins and 13 losses, and fifth in the AFC East division.

The 1986 Colts were the last team until the 2007 Miami Dolphins to lose their first thirteen games in a season. Head Coach Rod Dowhower was fired with three games left in the season and was replaced by Ron Meyer. It appeared that the Colts could be on their way to the NFL’s first anti-perfect season since the 1976 Buccaneers, and indeed there were many critics who argued that Colts wanted to go 0–16 to gain hot college quarterback prospect Vinny Testaverde, despite some fears Testaverde – like John Elway – would refuse to play for the team.However, at 0–13, the Colts defeated the Atlanta Falcons 28–13 in Week 14, by returning a blocked punt for a touchdown. They then won their last two games, to finish with three wins on the season. The Colts are the only team in NFL history to win the remainder of their games after starting winless.

1988 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1988 Indianapolis Colts season was the 36th season for the team in the National Football League (NFL) and fifth in Indianapolis. The team finished the year with a record of 9 wins and 7 losses, and tied for second in the AFC East division with the New England Patriots. However, the Colts finished ahead of New England based on better record against common opponents (7–5 to Patriots' 6–6).

1990 Phoenix Cardinals season

The 1990 Phoenix Cardinals season was the franchise's 92nd season, 71st season in the National Football League and the 3rd in Arizona. Despite rookie running back Johnny Johnson creating a good enough impression to make the Pro Bowl, the Cardinals did not improve upon their 5–11 record from 1989.

1991 Phoenix Cardinals season

The 1991 Phoenix Cardinals season was the 72nd season the team was in the National Football League (NFL). The team failed to improve on their previous output of 5–11, winning only four games. After beginning the season 2–0, the Cardinals suffered a tough schedule and lost their last eight matches to finish 4–12. This was the ninth consecutive season the Cardinals failed to qualify to the playoffs.

The Cardinals’ 196 points scored is the lowest total in franchise history for a 16-game season.

Byron Cummings

Byron Cummings (September 20, 1860 – May 21, 1954) was an American football coach and professor. He served as the head football coach at the University of Utah 1897 where he was also a professor from 1893 to 1915. He later served as a professor at the University of Arizona, where he became president.

List of Utah Utes football seasons

The Utah Utes football program is a college football team that represents the University of Utah. The Utes have completed 124 seasons and played in 21 certified bowl games. In 1910, Utah joined the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference (RMAC), the program's first conference affiliation. The Utes won eight conference championships, including six consecutive titles from 1928 to 1933. In 1938 the Utah, along with six other RMAC schools left the conference to form the Mountain States Conference, more commonly known as the Big Seven. After the Colorado Buffaloes withdrew from the Big Seven, the conference was known as the Skyline Conference. The Utes won ten conference championships while in the conference. In 1962, Utah became a charter member of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC). When the charter members of the WAC left at the end of the 1998 season, Utah became a charter member of the Mountain West Conference (MWC) winning four conference titles. In 2010, the Utes withdrew from the MWC and along with former conference rival Colorado, became the 11th and 12th members of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12) in the newly formed South Division.

List of Utah Utes head football coaches

The Utah Utes football program is a college football team that represents the University of Utah. The team has had 23 head coaches since organized football began in 1892. Harvey Holmes was the first paid head coach, and the Utes have had 17 paid, professional head coaches. The Utes have played in more than 1,000 games during its 116 seasons. In those seasons, 5 coaches have led the Utes to postseason bowl games: Ike Armstrong, Ray Nagel, Ron McBride, Urban Meyer, and Kyle Whittingham. 7 coaches have won conference championships with the Utes: Thomas Fitzpatrick, Armstrong, Jack "Cactus Jack" Curtice, Nagel, McBride, Meyer, and Whittingham. Armstrong is the all-time leader in number of games coached with 211, years coached with 25, and total wins with 141. Meyer is the all-time leader in winning percentage with a percentage of .917 in his two seasons at Utah. Tom Lovat is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Utes have had with a percentage of .152 during his three seasons as head coach (with the exception of Walter Shoup who only coached one game in 1895.)

Of the 23 Utes head coaches, Ike Armstrong has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Kyle Whittingham is the current head coach and has received National Coach of the Year honors from multiple organizations. He was hired in December 2004.

Mike Giddings

Mike Giddings (born c. 1933) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Utah from 1966 to 1967, compiling a record of 9–12. Giddings was later the head coach of The Hawaiians of the short-lived World Football League in 1974 and 1975.

Utah Utes football

The Utah Utes football program is a college football team that competes in the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12) of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of NCAA Division I and represents the University of Utah. The Utah college football program began in 1892 and has played home games at the current site of Rice-Eccles Stadium since 1927. They have won twenty-four conference championships in five conferences during their history, and, as of the end of the 2017 season, they have a cumulative record of 668 wins, 459 losses, and 31 ties.The Utes have a record of 17–5 (.770) in bowl games. Among Utah's bowl appearances are two games from the Bowl Championship Series (BCS): the Fiesta Bowl and the Sugar Bowl. In the 2005 Fiesta Bowl, Utah defeated the Pittsburgh Panthers 35–7, and in the 2009 Sugar Bowl, they defeated the Alabama Crimson Tide 31–17. During those seasons, Utah was a member of the Mountain West Conference, whose champion does not receive an automatic invitation to a BCS bowl. The Utes were the first team from a conference without an automatic bid to play in a BCS bowl game—colloquially known as being a BCS Buster—and the first BCS Buster to play in a second BCS Bowl.

Wayne Howard (American football)

Wayne Howard (born April 30, 1931) is a former American football coach. He was head coach at UC Riverside from 1972 to 1973, Long Beach State from 1974 to 1976 and Utah from 1977 to 1981. He had a career college football record of 70–37–2.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.