Tom Holmoe

Thomas Allen Holmoe (born March 7, 1960) is an American college athletics administrator and former football player and coach. He is the athletic director at Brigham Young University (BYU), a position he has held since 2005. Holmoe played college football at BYU and then professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the San Francisco 49ers from 1983 to 1989. He served as the head football coach at the University of California, Berkeley from 1997 to 2001.

Tom Holmoe
refer to caption
Tom Holmoe speaking at BYU in 2017
No. 28, 46
Position:Safety
Personal information
Born:March 7, 1960 (age 59)
Los Angeles, California
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:La Crescenta (CA) Valley
College:BYU
NFL Draft:1983 / Round: 4 / Pick: 90
Career history
As player:
As coach:
As administrator:
  • BYU (2005–present) (athletic director)
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:7
INT yards:172
Fumble recoveries:4
Touchdowns:2
Games played:82
Games started:7

Playing career

College

Holmoe starred in both basketball and football at Crescenta Valley High School in La Crescenta, California. He accepted a football scholarship to Brigham Young University, where he played as a cornerback and safety from 1978 to 1982. As a sophomore in 1980, he led the Western Athletic Conference with seven interceptions, and went on to earn all-WAC honors as a senior in 1982. The Cougars won the conference championship in each of his four seasons at the school.

Professional

Holmoe was drafted in the fourth round of the 1983 NFL Draft by the San Francisco 49ers. He played seven seasons for the 49ers, winning Super Bowls with the team in 1984, 1988 and 1989, before retiring due to a knee injury.

Coaching career

After retiring from playing, Holmoe entered the coaching ranks, having been urged by LaVell Edwards to return to BYU as a graduate assistant. In 1992, Holmoe accepted an offer from Bill Walsh to join his staff at Stanford University as the defensive backs coach. Holmoe remained at Stanford for two seasons, helping the 1992 Stanford Cardinal football team become the Pacific-10 Conference champions with a 10–3 overall record, including a win over Penn State in the Blockbuster Bowl.

Holmoe then returned to the 49ers, serving as George Seifert's defensive backfield coach for two seasons, where he coached such players as Deion Sanders, Merton Hanks and Eric Davis. As defensive backfield coach, he won a fourth Super Bowl in 1994. In 1996, Holmoe joined the University of California, Berkeley staff as defensive coordinator under Steve Mariucci.

Following Mariucci's departure to the NFL in 1997, Holmoe was named his successor. Holmoe, by his own admission, was an unsuccessful coach.[1] During his five-year tenure at Cal, he compiled a 16–39 record overall with a 9–31 mark in Pac-10 play. His final season, 2001, was the worst in the Golden Bears' history. Holmoe went 0–5 against rival Stanford and failed to reach a bowl game. Holmoe resigned at the end of the 2001 season.

Shortly afterward, the Bears were found guilty of major NCAA violations when it emerged that a professor retroactively added two football players to a class he had taught the previous spring in order to keep them eligible. Athletic department officials knew that the players were ineligible, but did not disclose it to anyone.[2] As a result, the NCAA slapped Cal with five years' probation, stripped the Bears of their four victories from the 1999 season, banned them from postseason play in 2002 and took away nine scholarships over four years.[3] When Jeff Tedford led the Bears to a 7–5 record in 2002, they were not allowed to play in a bowl game.

Athletic administration

After resigning from Cal, Holmoe returned to Brigham Young to serve as associate athletic director. In March 2005, he was appointed the 12th athletic director of the University, and the first to oversee both men's and women's athletics. Under his leadership, the Cougars have achieved enormous success, winning 14 conference championships in the 2006–07 academic year alone.

Holmoe has had particular success with his two most conspicuous coaching hires, BYU head football coach Bronco Mendenhall, who has led BYU's football team back to national prominence, and head men's basketball coach Dave Rose, who has returned BYU's men's basketball team to consistent Mountain West Conference championships and NCAA tournament appearances.

Personal life

Holmoe is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He lives in Provo, Utah, with his wife Lori and their four children. Holmoe's brother Steve, a physical education teacher and assistant football coach at Glendale High School, was a strong safety at UCLA before sustaining a career-ending injury.

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
California Golden Bears (Pacific-10 Conference) (1997–2001)
1997 California 3–8 1–7 9th
1998 California 5–6 3–5 7th
1999 California 0–7* 0–5* T–6th
2000 California 3–8 2–6 T–8th
2001 California 1–10 0–8 10th
California: 12–39 6-31
Total: 12–39

*Cal finished 4–7 (3–5 in conference), but later vacated the wins due to use of ineligible players

Coaching tree

Assistant coaches under Tom Holmoe who became NCAA head coaches:

References

  1. ^ Everson, Darren (August 29, 2008). "A Saner Approach to College Football". The Wall Street Journal. p. W1. Retrieved January 31, 2012.
  2. ^ University of California, Berkeley Public Infractions Report. NCAA: June 26, 2002.
  3. ^ Fernas, Rob (June 27, 2002). "Cal Is Hit With Bowl Ban". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 31, 2012.

External links

1981 Holiday Bowl

The 1981 Holiday Bowl was a college football bowl game played on December 18 in San Diego, California. It was part of the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season, and was the fourth edition of the Holiday Bowl. The Friday night game was the third of sixteen games in this bowl season and featured the 14th-ranked BYU Cougars, champions of the Western Athletic Conference, and the #20 Washington State Cougars of the Pac-10 Conference.

It was the fourth straight year in the Holiday Bowl for BYU, but the first bowl appearance in 51 years for Washington State, who used a two-quarterback system: junior Clete Casper was the passer and sophomore Ricky Turner the runner. BYU's quarterback was future Super Bowl champion Jim McMahon, backed up by sophomore Steve Young, a future member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame and also a Super Bowl champion.

1983 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1983 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 34th year with the National Football League. The team attempted to improve on its 3-6 record from 1982. The 49ers would start the season with a loss to the Philadelphia Eagles 22-17. However, the 49ers would continue to impress, as they throttled the Vikings the next week 48-17 and then the Cardinals the following week 42-27. They would end the first half of the season 6-2 before splitting their last eight games to finish the season 10-6 and clinching the NFC West. In the playoffs, the 49ers would come back to beat the Lions 24-23 after Joe Montana found Freddie Solomon in the end zone with 1:23 remaining. However, in the NFC Championship game, they were not able to outlast the top-seeded Redskins, as they lost 24-21 after Washington took the lead on a field goal.

1986 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1986 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League. The team returned to the top of the NFC West after a one-year absence, and lost the Divisional Playoffs to the Giants.

Joe Montana suffered a back injury in Week 1 and was lost for two months after surgery. Because the injury was so severe, doctors forced him to retire. However, Montana did return for Week 10 against the then-St. Louis Cardinals. Montana shared Comeback Player of the Year honors with Minnesota's Tommy Kramer at the end of the season.

1997 California Golden Bears football team

The 1997 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) during the 1997 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first year under head coach Tom Holmoe, the Golden Bears compiled a 3–8 record (1–7 against Pac-10 opponents), finished in ninth place in the Pac-10, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined score of 339 to 295. Home games were played at California Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, California.

The team's statistical leaders included Justin Vedder with 2,718 passing yards, Tarik Smith with 636 rushing yards, and Bobby Shaw with 1,093 receiving yards.

1998 California Golden Bears football team

The 1998 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) during the 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second year under head coach Tom Holmoe, the Golden Bears compiled a 5–6 record (3–5 against Pac-10 opponents), finished in seventh place in the Pac-10, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined score of 251 to 183.The team's statistical leaders included Justin Vedder with 2,322 passing yards, Marcus Fields with 734 rushing yards, and Dameane Douglas with 1,150 receiving yards.

1999 California Golden Bears football team

The 1999 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) during the 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third year under head coach Tom Holmoe, the Golden Bears compiled a 4–7 record (3–5 against Pac-10 opponents), finished in a tie for sixth place in the Pac-10, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined score of 254 to 180.Cal was forced to vacate all four wins of the 1999 season for altering the grades of two players.The team's statistical leaders included Kyle Boller with 1,303 passing yards, Joe Igber with 694 rushing yards, and Michael Ainsworth with 499 receiving yards.

2000 California Golden Bears football team

The 2000 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) during the 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach Tom Holmoe, the Golden Bears compiled a 3–8 record (2–6 against Pac-10 opponents), finished in last place in the Pac-10, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined score of 295 to 246.The team's statistical leaders included Kyle Boller with 2,121 passing yards, Joe Igber with 901 rushing yards, and Geoff McArthur with 336 receiving yards.

2001 California Golden Bears football team

The 2001 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) during the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth and final year under head coach Tom Holmoe, the Golden Bears compiled a 1–10 record (0–8 against Pac-10 opponents), finished in last place in the Pac-10, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined score of 431 to 201.The team's statistical leaders included Kyle Boller with 1,741 passing yards, Terrell Williams with 688 rushing yards, and Charon Arnold with 606 receiving yards.Following a loss to Arizona and an 0–8 start, Holmoe announced his resignation effective at the end of the season.

Addison Kelly

Addison W. "King" Kelly (c. 1875 – March 23, 1942) was an American football and baseball player, coach of football, and stockbroker. He played college football and college baseball at Princeton University, from which he graduated in 1898. In 1896 and 1897, Addison was selected as a halfback on the College Football All-America Team. He also played for four seasons as a first baseman on Princeton's baseball team. In 1900, Kelly served as the head football coach at the University of California, Berkeley, compiling a record of 4–2–1. He later worked as a stockbroker in association with several Wall Street firms. Kelly died at the age of 66 on March 23, 1942, at Roosevelt Hospital in New York City.

BYU Cougars softball

The BYU Cougars softball program began its first year in 2000. The current coach is Gordon Eakin who is in his 17th season coaching the BYU Cougars softball team.

Frank Wickhorst

Frank H. "Wick" Wickhorst (March 18, 1905 – September 13, 1972) was an American football player and coach. He played college football as a tackle at the United States Naval Academy and was selected as an All-American in 1926. Wickhorst served as the head football coach at the University of California, Berkeley in 1946, compiling a record of 2–7. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1970.

Glen Tuckett

Glen Tuckett (born 1927) was the coach of the Brigham Young University (BYU) baseball team from 1959 to 1976 and then BYU athletic director from 1976 to 1994.

Tuckett was raised in Murray, Utah. Tuckett played for the Salt Lake Bees and later for Salem's team. Prior to coming to BYU Tuckett coached the Calvary Dodgers. In 1995 Tuckett was appointed interim director of the University of Alabama athletic program in the wake of an NCAA investigation of violations in the program.

After his retirement Tuckett was recognized with the Homer Rice Award. In 2007, he was given the BYU Distinguished Service award.Tuckett is a Latter-day Saint.

Jeff Tedford

Jeffrey Raye Tedford (born November 2, 1961) is an American gridiron football coach and former player. He is the head football coach at California State University, Fresno, a position he has held since the 2017 season. From 2002 to 2012, Tedford was the head football coach at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was twice named Pac-10 Coach of the Year and holds California Golden Bears football program records for most wins, games coached, and bowl game victories.

Tedford played college football for the Fresno State Bulldogs before playing professionally at quarterback in the Canadian Football League (CFL). In his first head coaching position, Tedford inherited a Cal team that had won only one game in its 2001 season. He was named conference coach of the year in his first season in 2002 after winning seven games. Cal was ranked No. 2 nationwide midseason in 2007, the school's highest ranking since 1951. However, Tedford's teams struggled later in his Cal tenure, particularly from 2010 to 2012, and he was fired after the 2012 season. He was the seventh highest paid California state employee as of 2016.

Jimmie Schaeffer

James Garfield Schaeffer (February 1, 1885 – August 8, 1972) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the University of California head football coach from 1909 to 1915 and amassed a 73–16–8 record. From 1909 to 1914, California played football according to the rugby code, rather than the American code. He also coached the Cal baseball team from 1911 to 1915 and amassed a 39–21–2 record. Schaeffer resigned from both posts in November 1915. The executive committee of the student body denied that his resignation was forced, but there were rumors of "dissatisfaction with his services" after California was routed by Washington, 72–0.Schaeffer was born in Ohio in 1885 and died in California in 1972.

List of California Golden Bears football seasons

The following is a list of California Golden Bears football seasons for the football team that has represented University of California, Berkeley in NCAA competition.

List of California Golden Bears head football coaches

The California Golden Bears college football team represents the University of California, Berkeley in the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). The Golden Bears compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 34 head coaches since it began play during the 1886 season. As of 2017, Justin Wilcox is the head football coach of California Golden Bears.Jeff Tedford (2002–12) is the leader in seasons coached (11), games won (82), and bowl appearances (8). Pappy Waldorf (1948–56) led the team to three Rose Bowl games from 1948 to 1950. Andy Smith (1916–25) has the highest win percentage (.799) of any coach (minimum 3 seasons).

Oscar S. Howard

Oscar S. Howard was an American football coach. He was the first head football coach at the University of California, Berkeley, lead the California Golden Bears during a nine-game season played during the winter and spring of 1886. His 1886 team compiled a record of 6–2–1.

Ron Gould (American football)

Ronald Henry Gould (born September 15, 1965) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the running backs coach for the Stanford Cardinal football team. Prior to this position, he was the former football head coach at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), a position he assumed in December 2012. Gould was previously an assistant coach at the University of California, Berkeley. He spent sixteen seasons at Cal, all as running backs coach from 1997 to 2012 under head coaches Tom Holmoe and Jeff Tedford.

Steve Mariucci

Stephen Ray Mariucci (born November 4, 1955), nicknamed "Mooch", is an American sportscaster and former football coach who was the head coach of two National Football League teams, the San Francisco 49ers and the Detroit Lions, and for a year at the University of California, Berkeley.

Tom Holmoe—championships, awards, and honors

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