Tom Crabtree

Thomas Lewis Crabtree (born November 4, 1985) is a former American football tight end in the National Football League (NFL). He spent most of his career with the Green Bay Packers, with whom he won Super Bowl XLV over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Tom Crabtree
refer to caption
Crabtree with the Packers in 2012
No. 83, 84
Position:Tight end
Personal information
Born:November 4, 1985 (age 33)
Columbus, Ohio
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:245 lb (111 kg)
Career information
High school:Carroll (OH) Bloom-Carroll
College:Miami (OH)
Undrafted:2009
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:22
Receiving yards:323
Receiving touchdowns:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Crabtree played high school football for Bloom-Carroll High School in Carroll, Ohio.[1] He attended Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where he played tight end for the RedHawks for four seasons from 2005 to 2008. Primarily known as an excellent blocker, during his career at Miami he caught 40 passes for 329 yards (an 8.1 average) with two touchdowns.[2]

He graduated from Miami with a degree in secondary education.[3]

Professional career

Kansas City Chiefs

Crabtree was signed by the Kansas City Chiefs as an undrafted free agent on May 8, 2009. He appeared in all four of Kansas City’s preseason games, with two catches for 19 yards. He was then waived in the Chiefs' final roster cutdown on September 6, but he was signed to the Chiefs’ practice squad the next day after clearing waivers. He was released after the third regular-season game. Soon after being released Crabtree fell into a deep depression and began knitting to cope.

Green Bay Packers

During the 2009 NFL season, Crabtree was signed to the Green Bay Packers practice squad for the final five weeks of the 2009 NFL season and then to a reserve/futures contract after the season ended. He made it past the Packers' final roster cutdown before the 2010 NFL season as their third-string tight end behind Jermichael Finley, Donald Lee and ahead of rookie tight end Andrew Quarless.

In the 2010 regular season for the Packers, he totaled four catches for 61 yards. In 2011, he had six catches for 38 yards and one touchdown.

Crabtree played in all 16 games on offense and special teams. He caught a seven-yard touchdown pass from Aaron Rodgers in the first quarter of the Packers' wild card game at the Philadelphia Eagles, opening the scoring with his first NFL touchdown.[4]

He won a Super Bowl ring with the Packers on February 6, 2011 at Cowboys Stadium in Super Bowl XLV, won by the Packers 31-25. In the game, he had one catch (from Aaron Rodgers) for one yard and he also made one tackle.[5]

In 2012 against the Chicago Bears, Crabtree caught a touchdown pass from holder Tim Masthay on a fake field goal, as the Packers went on to win 23-10. Against the Houston Texans, he caught a 48-yard touchdown pass. Against the Cardinals, he caught a career-long 72-yard touchdown pass.[6]

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Crabtree signed a two-year contract with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on March 15, 2013.[7]

He started the season on injured reserve with a high ankle sprain suffered in a preseason game. The injury plagued him much of the season.[8] Once activated, he caught four passes for 21 yards with one touchdown. He was again placed on injured reserve November 25, ending his season after suffering a torn bicep, for which he underwent surgery.[9]

His lone touchdown of the 2013 season came on a 2-yard jump pass from running back Mike James.[10]

On May 17, 2014, Crabtree announced via Twitter that he had been released from the Buccaneers.[11]

New Orleans Saints

Crabtree signed with New Orleans Saints on October 7, 2014 after tight end try outs were conducted on the same day, with Crabtree getting the nod from the team.[12] He was released on October 18, 2014,[13] but was re-signed to the active roster two days later on October 20.[14] He was eventually released again on October 24. Although he was released from the active roster prior to game days, Crabtree still collected his weekly paycheck for participating in the practices of the several weeks he was with the Saints.

Retirement

On April 30, 2015, Crabtree announced his retirement from football.[15] He spent a total of seven years in the league.

Personal life

He married Chelsea Crabtree on June 28, 2009. They have a son, Bryce Thomas Crabtree, born October 14, 2010, and a daughter, Delaynie. He also has three dogs: Molly, a Boston Terrier, Annie, a Belgian Malinois, and Opie, a pug, who is a very good boy . He and his wife are active in raising funds and awareness for juvenile diabetes and for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.[16] Tom is a massive Ohio state fan having been born in Columbus.

In 2016, he appeared in a short promotional video produced by eighth-graders of Bloom-Carroll Middle School (his junior-high alma mater) to help boost yearbook sales.[17]

On November 30, 2016, he became a recurring guest on the podcast Pardon My Take, hosted by Dan "Big Cat" Katz and another person believed to be Marlins Woman.[18]

Statistics

Regular season

Offense

Year Receiving
Team G Rec Yds TD Avg
2010 GB 16 4 61 0 15.3
2011 GB 16 6 38 1 6.3
2012 GB 14 8 203 3 25.4
2013 TB 7 4 21 1 5.3
Total 53 22 323 5 14.7

Defense

Year Tackles
Team G Tot Tkl Ast
2010 GB 16 10 8 2
2011 GB 16 6 5 1
2012 GB 2 6 5 1
Total 32 16 13 3

Playoff statistics

Offense

Year Receiving
Team G Rec Yds TD Avg
2010 GB 4 2 8 1 4.0
Total 4 2 8 1 4.0

References

  1. ^ http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/sports/2011/01/27/crabtree-basks-in-moment.html
  2. ^ http://www.muredhawks.com/SportSelect.dbml?SPID=87601
  3. ^ http://www.buccaneers.com/team/roster/tom-crabtree/7b5cc6e5-b885-4be3-84ea-7aeb43a0cfbe/
  4. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/C/CrabTo00.htm
  5. ^ "Super Bowl XLV - Pittsburgh Steelers vs. Green Bay Packers - February 6th, 2011". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 15, 2017.
  6. ^ Mayer, Larry. "Bears stunned by TD on fake field goal". Chicagobears.com. Retrieved September 14, 2012.
  7. ^ Bucs Sign Crabtree, Bolster Tight End Corps
  8. ^ http://www.buccaneers.com/team-and-stats/injury-report.html
  9. ^ http://fantasynews.cbssports.com/fantasyfootball/players/playerpage/1675830/tom-crabtree
  10. ^ http://fantasynews.cbssports.com/fantasyfootball/players/playerpage/1675830/tom-crabtree
  11. ^ Wilkening, Mike. "Tom Crabtree announces his release from Buccaneers". Pro Football Talk. Retrieved May 17, 2014.
  12. ^ http://www.nola.com/saints/index.ssf/2014/10/new_orleans_saints_sign_tight_4.html
  13. ^ Wilkening, Mike. "Saints release TE Tom Crabtree". Pro Football Talk. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  14. ^ Mike Triplett, "Saints place DE Glenn Foster on IR, re-sign TE Tom Crabtree", October 20, 2014.
  15. ^ Tom Crabtree [@itsCrab] (April 30, 2015). "I'm officially retiring from football. Thanks for all the support and criticism over the years. This means I can do dirty jokes on here now" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  16. ^ "Packers tight end Crabtree fights brave battle with his wife", WTMJ-TV, April 30, 2012.
  17. ^ Video on YouTube
  18. ^ http://www.barstoolsports.com/chicago/pardon-my-take-11-30-with-former-green-bay-packer-tom-crabtree/

External links

1956 Oregon Webfoots football team

The 1956 Oregon Webfoots football team represented the University of Oregon in the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) during the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. In their sixth season under head coach Len Casanova, the Webfoots compiled a 4–4–2 record (3–3–2 against PCC opponents), finished in fifth place in the PCC, and outscored their opponents, 133 to 102. The team played its home games at Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon.

The team's statistical leaders included Tom Crabtree with 366 passing yards, Jack Morris with 519 rushing yards, and Jim Shanley with 173 receiving yards.

2007 Miami RedHawks football team

The 2007 Miami RedHawks football team represented the Miami University in the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Shane Montgomery and played their homes game in Yager Stadium in Oxford, Ohio.

2010 Green Bay Packers season

The 2010 Green Bay Packers season was the 92nd season overall and their 90th season in the National Football League. Although they finished with only a respectable 10–6 record, good for a second-place finish in the NFC North, the Packers never lost a game by more than four points, and never trailed by more than seven the entire season, becoming the only team since the AFL-NFL merger in 1970 to accomplish this. All six of their regular season losses were by a combined 20 points. They entered the playoffs as the NFC's sixth seed. After defeating the Philadelphia Eagles 21–16 in the Wild Card round, the Atlanta Falcons 48–21 in the Divisional round and long time rivals, Chicago Bears 21–14 in the NFC Championship, the team advanced to Super Bowl XLV in which they faced the AFC's 2nd seed Pittsburgh Steelers. The Packers defeated the Steelers 31–25 to win their fourth Super Bowl and 13th NFL championship. The Packers became the second overall team after the 2005 Pittsburgh Steelers, and the first NFC team, to win the Super Bowl as a sixth seed, as well as becoming the second NFC team to win three straight road playoff games (the 2007 New York Giants won three straight road games as a five seed).

The Packers offense ranked ninth in yards per game, tenth in total points, & fifth in passing yards. The defense ranked fifth in yards allowed and finished second in fewest points allowed (240, second best in team history), sacks (47), and interceptions (24), while also limiting quarterbacks to a 67.2 passer rating, first in the league.

2010–11 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 2010 season began on January 8, 2011. The postseason tournament concluded with the Green Bay Packers defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XLV, 31–25, on February 6, at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. This was the first Super Bowl in which the NFC representative was a #6 seed, and only the second time one has made the Super Bowl (the previous being the 2005 Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XL).

This was only the second postseason in NFL history that included a team with a losing record, and the first to occur with a full regular season. The Seattle Seahawks won their division with a 7–9 record, as all four teams in the NFC West had losing seasons in 2010. Only the 1982–83 NFL playoffs, following the strike-shortened 1982, had previously included teams with losing records (under a modified 16-team tournament, with eight from each conference, the 1982 Cleveland Browns and Detroit Lions qualified with records of 4–5). Six days after winning the division, the Seahawks defeated the defending Super Bowl champion New Orleans Saints to become the first playoff team with a losing record to win in the postseason.

In the opening wildcard round of the playoffs, three of the four home teams had fewer wins than the away team. The exception was the Green Bay Packers–Philadelphia Eagles match, where both were 10–6 (the Packers had defeated the Eagles in Week 1 of the season, but were on the road because they were the wild card team). But away teams finished 6–4 this playoff season for wins. This was the second time since the 1979 NFL season where neither of the number one playoff seeds advanced to their conference's respective championship game. The other in the 2008–09 NFL playoffs. Also, had the New York Jets also won their conference championship game it would have been the first #6 vs #6 seed in Super Bowl history.

Unless otherwise noted, all times listed are Eastern Standard Time (UTC−05)

2011 Green Bay Packers season

The 2011 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 93rd season overall and their 91st in the National Football League, and the sixth under head coach Mike McCarthy. The team not only improved on their 10–6 record from a season earlier, they became just the sixth team in NFL history to win 15 games during the regular season. As of 2017, the 15–1 record stands as the best in team history. The Packers won their first 13 games of the season to extend their winning streak from the previous season to 19, the second-longest in NFL history behind the 21-game winning streak of the New England Patriots in 2003 and 2004, and also tied the record for the best start to a season in NFC history that the New Orleans Saints had set in 2009. The only loss for the Packers during the regular season was a Week 15 defeat in Arrowhead Stadium against the Kansas City Chiefs. They also became the first NFC North team to go undefeated in the division since the 1987 Chicago Bears.

Statistics site Football Outsiders calculated that the Packers were, play for play, the best team in the NFL in 2011 (though they received the second-lowest rating for a number-1 team since the 1993 San Francisco 49ers). According to the site, the Packers' offense was historically prolific, ranking as the second-best pass offense and third-best total offense since they began calculating. Furthermore, quarterback Aaron Rodgers had the fourth-most-prolific season, play by play, since calculations began and some have called it one of the most efficient seasons ever by a quarterback by setting the NFL record for highest passer rating in a season (122.5). The 2011 Packers are one of only five teams in NFL history to score 35 points or more nine times in a single season and one of only two teams to score 42 points or more in at least six games, the other being the 2013 Broncos. The Packers' 70 total touchdowns are tied with the 1984 Dolphins for the third-most touchdowns scored in a season, and their 51 total touchdown passes are tied with the 2004 Colts for second-most touchdown passes in a season. The defense was ranked last, 32nd, in the league in yards allowed and surrendered an NFL record 4,796 passing yards despite leading the league in interceptions, with 31.

With their record-setting offense, their 15–1 record, and their having home-field advantage throughout the NFC playoffs, the Packers were aiming to repeat as Super Bowl champions, and become the first team to win back-to-back titles since the Patriots in 2003 and 2004. However, the Packers instead became the first team to finish with at least 15 victories and not win a playoff game, as they were beaten in a shocking upset by the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants 37–20 at Lambeau Field. The Packers became just the sixth team to win 15 games in the regular season, joining the 1984 49ers, 1985 Bears, 1998 Vikings, 2004 Steelers and the 2007 Patriots, who finished the regular season undefeated at 16–0. The Packers became the fourth consecutive team with at least fifteen victories to fail to win the Super Bowl.

2012 Houston Texans season

The 2012 Houston Texans season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League and the 7th under head coach Gary Kubiak. The Texans improved on their 10–6 record from 2011, in which the team earned its first playoff berth and division title in franchise history. The Texans won their second consecutive AFC South division title, and defeated the Cincinnati Bengals in the Wild Card round of the playoffs for a second consecutive season, but were defeated by the New England Patriots in the divisional round.

2013 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season

The 2013 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 38th season in the National Football League, and the second under head coach Greg Schiano. It also marked the 19th and final season under the ownership of Malcolm Glazer, who died on May 28, 2014. The Buccaneers finished with a record of 4–12 and failed to improve their 7–9 record from last season, and were eliminated from postseason contention in Week 13. For the first time since 1996, longtime cornerback Ronde Barber was not on the roster, as he retired in May 2013.

Despite having a +10 turnover margin (tied for 3rd best in the NFL), and franchise rookie quarterback records from third round draft pick Mike Glennon, the overall offensive production ranked near the bottom of the league in most categories. The team ranked 32nd (last) in total yards, 32nd (last) in passing yards, 30th in total points scored. The team also had the third-most penalties in the league (121 for 1,136 yards), and ranked 31st in third down conversions. Running back Doug Martin went on injured reserve halfway through the season with a shoulder injury. His replacement, Bobby Rainey had a solid performance, scoring his first career touchdown, and setting a franchise record for longest touchdown run (80 yards). On the defensive side, the offseason news was highlighted by the free agent acquisition of Darrelle Revis, and Lavonte David's stellar numbers.

Carroll, Ohio

Carroll is a village in Fairfield County, Ohio, United States. The population was 524 at the 2010 census.

Crabtree (surname)

The surname Crabtree may refer to:

Arthur Crabtree (1900–1975), a British cinematographer

Bill Crabtree (1915–2001), an Australian politician

Clyde Crabtree (1905–1994), an American college and professional football player

Don Crabtree (1912–1980), a flintknapper and pioneering experimental archaeologist

Eorl Crabtree (born 1982), a British Rugby League player

Eric Crabtree, (born 1944), a former NFL player

Estel Crabtree, a Major League Baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s

Gerald Crabtree, an American biochemist

Grant H. Crabtree (1913–2008), an award-winning cinematographer, director and photographer

Helen Crabtree (1915–2002), an important woman in the history of Saddle Seat Riding

Herbert Grace Crabtree, an English biochemist

Jack Crabtree, a former American football player

Jack Crabtree (artist), an English contemporary artist

Jane Crabtree (born 1981), an Australia badminton player

Jimmy Crabtree (1871–1908), an English football player

Jimmy Crabtree (footballer, born 1895) (1895–1965), English footballer

Joe Crabtree, British drummer

Julian Crabtree, a long distance swimmer and adventurer

Lotta Crabtree (1847–1924), an American actor and comedian

Michael Crabtree (born 1987), an American NFL wide receiver for Baltimore Ravens

Mike Crabtree, a British racing driver

Robert H. Crabtree, a British chemist

Shirley Crabtree aka Big Daddy (1930–1997), an English professional wrestler

Steve Crabtree (born 1955), an American journalist

Susan Crabtree, senior editor of The Hill

Tim Crabtree, a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Toronto Blue Jays and Texas Rangers

Tom Crabtree, American football tight end

Tom Crabtree (journalist), television newscaster in South Carolina

William Crabtree (1610–1644), an astronomer, mathematician

William Crabtree (architect) (1905–1991), an English architect

Lincolnshire Bombers

The Lincolnshire Bombers are a British American football team based in North Hykeham, Lincolnshire, England. The team in its current form was founded in 2005. They currently play in the BAFA NFC South 2 for the 2017 season. The original team the Lincoln Bombers were formed in the late 1980s and in 1992 the team was renamed the Lincoln Saints. The Saints were 1993 National First Division champions. Following several mergers with other regional clubs The Saints disbanded leaving the county without an American Football team until the club reformed in 2005.

List of Miami University people

The following is a list of presidents, notable alumni and faculty members of Miami University, in Oxford, Ohio, U.S.

List of Oregon Ducks starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started for the Oregon Ducks. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback.

List of people from Ohio

The following is a list of famous people born in Ohio, and people who spent significant periods of their lives living in Ohio.

Miami RedHawks football

The Miami RedHawks football (known as the Miami Redskins before 1996) program represents Miami University, located in Oxford, Ohio, in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS level. The RedHawks compete in the Mid-American Conference and are known for producing several high-profile head coaches, earning it the nickname "Cradle of Coaches". The team is currently coached by Chuck Martin and play their home games at Yager Stadium.

Super Bowl XLV

Super Bowl XLV was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Pittsburgh Steelers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Green Bay Packers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2010 season. The Packers defeated the Steelers by the score of 31–25. The game was played on February 6, 2011 at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, the first time the Super Bowl was played in the Dallas–Fort Worth area.

Unlike most other Super Bowls, this game featured two title-abundant franchises: coming into the game, the Packers held the most NFL championships with 12 (9 league championships prior to the Super Bowl era and 3 Super Bowl championships), while the Steelers held the most Super Bowl championships with 6. The Packers entered their fifth Super Bowl in team history, and became the first number 6-seeded team in the NFC to compete in the Super Bowl, after posting a 10–6 regular season record. The Steelers finished the regular season with a 12–4 record, and advanced to a league-tying 8th Super Bowl appearance.

Green Bay dominated most of the first half of Super Bowl XLV, jumping to a 21–3 lead before Pittsburgh cut it down to 21–10 just before halftime. Then after the teams exchanged touchdowns, the Steelers pulled within 28–25 midway through the fourth quarter with wide receiver Mike Wallace's 25-yard touchdown reception from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and a two-point conversion. But the Packers answered with Mason Crosby's 23-yard field goal with 2:07 remaining, and then prevented the Steelers from scoring on their final drive of the game. Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers was named Super Bowl MVP, completing 24 of 39 passes for 304 yards and three touchdowns.

The broadcast of Super Bowl XLV on Fox averaged about 111 million viewers, breaking the record for the most-watched program in American television history. The game's attendance was 103,219, just short of the Super Bowl record 103,985 set in Super Bowl XIV at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. The halftime show featured the American hip hop group The Black Eyed Peas, with additional performances by Usher and Slash.

Ted Thompson

Ted Thompson (born January 17, 1953) is an American football executive for the Green Bay Packers and former player. He was the general manager of the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 2005 to 2017. He was named to the post on January 14, 2005, by former Packers president and CEO Bob Harlan. Thompson took over the general manager duties from Mike Sherman, who had been serving as both head coach and general manager. Prior to becoming the Packers' general manager, Thompson served with the Seattle Seahawks as their vice president of operations from 2000 to 2004. Thompson had previously worked for the Packers organization from 1992 to 1999, serving as their assistant director of pro personnel in 1992, their director of pro personnel from 1993 to 1997, and their director of player personnel from 1997 to 1999. Thompson also had a 10-year playing career in the NFL as a linebacker and special teams player with the Houston Oilers from 1975 to 1984.

Tim Masthay

Timothy James "Tim" Masthay (born March 16, 1987) is a former American football punter. He played college football at Kentucky. Masthay was signed by the Indianapolis Colts as an undrafted free agent in 2009. He has also played for the Green Bay Packers and later won Super Bowl XLV with the Packers over his hometown team, the Pittsburgh Steelers. Masthay was nicknamed "Ginger Wolverine" by his Packers teammates for his long red sideburns.

Tom Crabtree (journalist)

Tom Crabtree is the lead news anchor at WSPA-TV 7, the CBS TV station located in the Spartanburg, South Carolina.He started at the station in 1983 as a reporter. He has been the lead male anchor since the early 1990s and is a former winner of The South Carolina Newsman of the Year Award.

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