Tom Borland

Thomas Bruce Borland (February 14, 1933 – March 2, 2013), nicknamed "Spike", was an American relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played portions of the 1960 and 1961 seasons for the Boston Red Sox. Borland batted and threw left-handed, stood 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) tall and weighed 172 pounds (78 kg).

Born in Kansas, Borland graduated from high school in McAlester, Oklahoma, and attended what is now Oklahoma State University, where he was named Most Outstanding Player of the 1955 College World Series. His minor league career began in 1955 with the Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League, but he was declared a free agent by Commissioner of Baseball Ford Frick when it was discovered that the Baltimore Orioles had violated the bonus rule of the day by signing Borland, then loaning him to the Oaks.[1] Signed then by the Red Sox, Borland missed two full years (1956–57) while serving in the United States Army. In 1959, he won 14 games, losing eight, and posted a strong 2.73 earned run average for American Association champion Minneapolis, and was promoted to the Red Sox in mid-May 1960.

In 27 MLB appearances (26 in 1960 and only one in 1961), including four games started, Borland posted an 0–4 record with a poor 6.75 ERA in 52 innings pitched, allowing 70 hits and 23 bases on balls. He struck out 32 and was credited with three saves as a relief pitcher.

As a minor leaguer he had a 48–39 record and a 3.42 ERA between 1955 and 1963. He was traded to the expansion Houston Colt .45s in March 1962 in exchange for Dave Philley, but never appeared in a Major League game for them. Instead, he spent two years in his home state for Houston's Triple-A affiliate, the Oklahoma City 89ers, before leaving baseball.

Tom Borland
Pitcher
Born: February 14, 1933
El Dorado, Kansas
Died: March 2, 2013 (aged 80)
Stillwater, Oklahoma
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
May 15, 1960, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
April 23, 1961, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record0–4
Earned run average6.75
Strikeouts32
Innings pitched52
Teams

References

  1. ^ Bill Nowlin, Tom Borland. Society for American Baseball Research Biography Project

External links

1933 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world.

1954 NCAA Baseball Tournament

The 1954 NCAA Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1954 NCAA baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its eighth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series, but for the first time the preliminary tournament rounds hosted by each district were sanctioned NCAA events. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 24 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The College World Series was held in Omaha, NE from June 10 to June 16. The eighth tournament's champion was Missouri, coached by John "Hi" Simmons. The Most Outstanding Player was Tom Yewcic of Michigan State.

1955 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media.

From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1955 NCAA Baseball Tournament

The 1955 NCAA Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1955 NCAA baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its ninth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 25 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The College World Series was held in Omaha, NE from June 10 to June 16. The ninth tournament's champion was Wake Forest, coached by Taylor Sanford. The Most Outstanding Player was Tom Borland of Oklahoma A&M.

1955 NCAA baseball season

The 1955 NCAA baseball season, play of college baseball in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) began in the spring of 1955. The season progressed through the regular season and concluded with the 1955 College World Series. The College World Series, held for the ninth time in 1955, consisted of one team from each of eight geographical districts and was held in Omaha, Nebraska at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium as a double-elimination tournament. Wake Forest claimed the championship.

1960 Boston Red Sox season

The 1960 Boston Red Sox season was the 60th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 65 wins and 89 losses, 32 games behind the AL champion New York Yankees.

1961 Boston Red Sox season

The 1961 Boston Red Sox season was the 61st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses, 33 games behind the AL and World Series champion New York Yankees.

1962 Boston Red Sox season

The 1962 Boston Red Sox season was the 62nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished eighth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 84 losses, 19 games behind the AL pennant winner and eventual World Series champion New York Yankees.

1962 Houston Colt .45s season

The 1962 Houston Colt .45s were an expansion team in American Major League Baseball's National League, and 1962 was the first season in franchise history. Harry Craft was Houston's first manager. The .45s finished eighth among the National League's ten teams with a record of 64–96, 36½ games behind the league champion San Francisco Giants.

Borland (surname)

Borland is a surname of Scottish origin. The Borland ancestors came to Scotland with the Normans in the 11th Century

Notable people with the surname include:

Adrian Borland (1957–1999), English singer, songwriter, and record producer

Billy Borland (1888–1915), Scottish footballer

Bruce Borland (1958–1999), American golf course designer

Carroll Borland (1914–1994), American professor, writer, and actor

Charles Borland (contemporary), American actor

Charles Borland Jr. (1786–1852), American politician; congressman from New York

Chris Borland (born 1990), retired U.S football player

Christine Borland (born 1965), Scottish artist

Frank “Jiggs” Borland (1925–2013), Canadian soldier; recipient of the French Légion d’honneur during WWII

Hal Borland (1900–1978), American journalist and author

James A. Borland (born 1944), American evangelical professor

Jimmy Borland (1910–1970c. 1938), English professional ice hockey player

John Borland (born 1977), English footballer

John Borland (Scottish footballer) (born 1951), Scottish footballer

Johnny Borland (1925–1990), New Zealand high jumper and athletics administrator

Kathryn A. Borland (born 1962), American film producer

Kevin Borland (1926–2000), Australian Post War Architect, recipient of 10 RAIA awards

Kyle Borland (born 1961), NFL linebacker

Polly Borland (born 1959), Australian photographer

Scott Borland (contemporary, born 1979), American musician

Solon Borland (1808–1864), American newspaperman, soldier, diplomat, and politician

Toby Borland (born 1969), American professional baseball player

Tom Borland (1933–2013), American professional baseball player

W. S. Borland (1878–1959), American football and baseball coach

Wes Borland (born 1975), American musician and rock guitarist

William Borland (darts player) (born 1996), Scottish darts player

William Borland (loyalist) (1969–2016), Northern Irish former footballer and loyalist activist

William Patterson Borland (1867–1919), American politician from Missouri; U.S. congressman 1909–1919

Willie Borland (born 1952), Scottish footballer

Boston Red Sox all-time roster

The following is a list of players, past and present, who have appeared in at least one competitive game for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (founded in 1908), known previously as the Boston Americans (1901–07).

Players in bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Non-US players are indicated by the appropriate flag.

College World Series

The College World Series (CWS) is an annual June baseball tournament held in Omaha, Nebraska. The CWS is the culmination of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Baseball Championship tournament—featuring 64 teams in the first round—which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight participating teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winners of each bracket playing in a best-of-three championship series.

College World Series Most Outstanding Player

The College World Series Most Outstanding Player is an award for the best individual performance during the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska. The recipient of the award is announced at the completion of the College World Series Championship Game. The award is similar to Major League Baseball's World Series Most Valuable Player award.

Since 1999, the winner of the award has received a miniature replica of "The Road to Omaha" sculpture, which is situated at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha. The award measures 16 inches high. There have been 10 recipients of this award who were on not on the winning team of the College World Series. The College World Series started in 1947 but the award was not given out until 1949.

El Dorado, Kansas

El Dorado ( EL-də-RAY-doh) is city and county seat of Butler County, Kansas, United States. It is situated along the Walnut River in the central part of Butler County and located in south-central Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 13,021.

List of Major League Baseball players (B)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2011 season, there have been 1,702 players with a last name that begins with B who have been on a major league roster at some point.

List of people from Butler County, Kansas

The following is a list of people from Butler County, Kansas. The area includes the cities of El Dorado, Augusta, Rose Hill, and other cities rural areas in the county. Inclusion on the list should be reserved for notable people past and present who have resided in the county, either in cities or rural areas.

Littleton Fowler

Littleton Fowler (born c. 1941) was an American baseball pitcher who is most notable for winning the 1961 College World Series Most Outstanding Player award while a sophomore at Oklahoma State University. He was the third player from Oklahoma State University to win this award: Tom Borland (1955) and Jim Dobson (1959). In that College World Series, he pitched 23 innings over five games, allowing only 14 hits with 13 strikeouts. He is also in the Oklahoma State University Baseball Hall of Fame.

Fowler never turned pro, becoming an optometrist instead.

National College Baseball Hall of Fame

The National College Baseball Hall of Fame is an institution operated by the College Baseball Foundation serving as the central point for the study of the history of college baseball in the United States. In partnership with the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library located on the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, the Hall of Fame inducts former collegiate players and coaches who have met selection criteria of distinction.

Oklahoma State Cowboys baseball

Oklahoma State Cowboys baseball is the NCAA Division I varsity intercollegiate baseball team of Oklahoma State University, based in Stillwater, Oklahoma, United States. The team competes in the Big 12 Conference.

Oklahoma State has won 31 conference championships in baseball, as well as 21 conference tournament championships, as of June 1, 2015. The Cowboys have also earned 46 NCAA Tournament bids (fourth most all-time) and have played in 20 College World Series (sixth most all-time), including seven straight from 1981–87, with their lone national championship coming in 1959. OSU ranks sixth in all-time win percentage among all Division I programs, with an all-time record of 2,513–1,266–4 (.665). The Cowboys' current head coach is Josh Holliday.

Players
Coaches
Veteran players
(pre-1947 era)

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