Tom Bettis

Thomas William Bettis (March 17, 1933 – February 28, 2015) was an All-American football linebacker, NFL player, and NFL coach. After starring at Purdue, Bettis was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the first round of the 1955 NFL Draft. He played nine seasons for the Packers, the Pittsburgh Steelers, and the Chicago Bears. After his playing career, Bettis went on to coach in the NFL for 30 years, including for the 1969–70 Super Bowl IV champions and the 1966–67 AFL champions, the Kansas City Chiefs. Bettis served as interim coach of the Chiefs in 1977 after the firing of Paul Wiggin. In seven games as head coach, Bettis compiled a 1–6 record, ending a 12-year stint as a coach of the Chiefs. He returned in 1988 to be the defensive backs coach of the Chiefs. He was inducted into both the Purdue University Athletic Hall of Fame and the Chicagoland Sports Hall of Fame.[1]

Bettis died on February 28, 2015.[2]

Tom Bettis
refer to caption
Bettis on a 1955 Bowman football card
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:March 17, 1933
Chicago, Illinois
Died:February 28, 2015 (aged 81)
Katy, Texas
Career information
High school:St. Mel (Chicago, Illinois)
College:Purdue
NFL Draft:1955 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com

See also

References

  1. ^ "Tom Bettis Stats - Pro-Football-Reference.com". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved December 19, 2016.
  2. ^ Mike Wilkening (March 4, 2015). "Former Packers No. 1 pick Tom Bettis passes away at 81". nbcsports.com. Retrieved December 19, 2016.
1953 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1953 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP) and the International News Service (INS) for the 1953 Big Ten Conference football season.

1953 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1953 Big Ten Conference football season was the 58th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1953 college football season.

The 1953 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Clarence Munn, won the Big Ten championship in the program's first year of participating in the Big Ten. The Spartans compiled a 9–1 record and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP and UPI polls. End Don Dohoney was a consensus first-team All-American. Halfback LeRoy Beldon was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1953 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Ray Eliot, finished in second place in the Big Ten with a 7–1–1, led the conference with 25.3 points allowed per game, and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll. Halfback J. C. Caroline was a consensus first-team All-American.

Minnesota quarterback Paul Giel was a consensus first-team All-American and received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player for the second consecutive year.

1953 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1953 Purdue Boilermakers football team was an American football team that represented Purdue University during the 1953 Big Ten Conference football season. In their seventh season under head coach Stu Holcomb, the Boilermakers compiled a 2–7 record, finished in eighth place in the Big Ten Conference with a 2–4 record against conference opponents, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 167 to 89.Notable players on the 1953 Purdue team included guard Tom Bettis.

1954 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1954 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1954 Big Ten Conference football season.

1954 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1954 Big Ten Conference football season was the 59th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1954 college football season.

The 1954 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, won the conference football championship, compiled a 10–0, was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, and defeated USC in the 1955 Rose Bowl. Halfback Howard Cassady was selected as the team's most valuable player and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1954 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Ivy Williamson, compiled a 7–2 record and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. Fullback Alan Ameche won the 1954 Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the Big Ten Conference. Ameche broke Ollie Matson's career rushing record, finishing his tenure at Wisconsin with 3,212 rushing yards.Purdue quarterback Len Dawson led the conference with 1,464 passing yards.

1954 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1954 Purdue Boilermakers football team was an American football team that represented Purdue University during the 1954 Big Ten Conference football season. In their eighth season under head coach Stu Holcomb, the Boilermakers compiled a 5–3–1 record, finished in approximately sixth place in the Big Ten Conference with a 3–3 record against conference opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of about 165 to 134.Notable players on the 1954 Purdue team included quarterback Len Dawson, guard Tom Bettis, and end John Kerr.

1955 Green Bay Packers season

The 1955 Green Bay Packers season was their 37th season overall and their 35th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–6 record under coach Lisle Blackbourn, earning them a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1956 Green Bay Packers season

The 1956 Green Bay Packers season was their 38th season overall and their 36th in the National Football League. The club posted a 4–8 record under coach Lisle Blackbourn, earning them a fifth-place finish in the Western Conference.

1957 Green Bay Packers season

The 1957 Green Bay Packers season was their 39th season overall and their 37th season in the National Football League. After an opening win, the club posted a 3–9 record under fourth-year head coach Lisle Blackbourn and finished last in the Western Conference. It was Blackbourn's final season at Green Bay, who was replaced by Ray McLean in January 1958 for just one year, succeeded by Vince Lombardi in 1959.

The 1957 season also marked the Packers' move from City Stadium to new City Stadium, which was opened with a win over the Chicago Bears in week one on September 29. It was renamed Lambeau Field in August 1965 in memory of Packers founder, player, and long-time head coach, Curly Lambeau, who had died two months earlier.

1977 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1977 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 8th season in the National Football League, the 15th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 18th overall. This season was the worst in franchise history until the 2008 season, with the Chiefs winning only two of fourteen games. After an 0–5 start, Head coach Paul Wiggin was fired following a 44–7 loss to Cleveland in week seven. Tom Bettis took over as interim head coach for the rest of the season. The team endured a six-game losing streak to conclude the season at 2–12.

1979 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1979 St. Louis Cardinals season was the franchise’s 60th year with the National Football League and the 20th season in St. Louis. Bud Wilkinson would be fired in week 13 after starting 3–10, Larry Wilson would take over as interim head coach and lead the Cardinals to a 2–1 record to finish the season. Wilson would not return for the 1980 season but would return as Vice President and General Manager nine years later when the Cardinals had moved to Phoenix.

1980 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1980 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 61st season the team was in the league. The team matched their previous output of 5–11. The team failed to reach the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

1981 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1981 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 62nd season the franchise was in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 5–11, winning seven games. Despite the improvement the team failed – for the sixth consecutive season – to reach the playoffs.

1983 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1983 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 64th season the team was in the National Football League. The Cardinals won eight games, including victories over both participants in that year's AFC Championship Game, the Raiders and Seahawks. However, the team also lost in meetings over both participants of the 1983 NFC Championship Game, the 49ers and the Redskins. Despite their winning record, the team failed to reach the playoffs.

The Cardinals had a winning record, despite being outscored by a total of 54 points during the regular season. In fact, St. Louis’ 428 points surrendered was, to that point, the most points given up by a team with a winning record in NFL history; it is still second-most all time.

1984 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1984 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 65th year with the National Football League and the 25th season in St. Louis. Despite finishing with the same 9–7 record as their division rivals Dallas and New York, the Giants made the playoffs based upon the best head-to-head record among the three teams.The Cardinals’ 6,345 offensive yards in 1984 was third in the NFL, and the most in team history. Their 423 points were fourth-best in the league.

1986 Houston Oilers season

The 1986 Houston Oilers season was the 27th season overall and 17th with the National Football League (NFL). The team matched their previous season's output of 5–11, and missed the playoffs for the sixth consecutive season.

Bettis

Bettis is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Angela Bettis (born 1973), American actress, director and producer

Chad Bettis (born 1989), American baseball player

Hilary Bettis, American playwright, actress, producer and writer

J. Warren Bettis (1924–2011), American jurist

Jerome Bettis (born 1972), American football player

Jerrod Bettis, American music producer, composer and musician

John Bettis (born 1946), American lyricist

Randy Bettis (born 1959), American DJ and music producer

Richard A. Bettis (born 1947), American business theorist

Tom Bettis (1933–2015), American football player

Valerie Bettis (1919–1982), American modern dancer and choreographer

Zachariah Bettis (1816–1879), American politician

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Kansas City Chiefs head coaches

The Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL) have had 13 head coaches in their franchise history. The franchise was founded in 1960 by Lamar Hunt and were known as the Dallas Texans when the team was located in Dallas, Texas. The team relocated to Kansas City, Missouri and were renamed the Chiefs in 1963. The franchise was a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) before entering into the NFL following the AFL-NFL merger.Hank Stram, the team's first head coach, led the Chiefs to three AFL championship victories and two appearances in the Super Bowl. Stram was the team's longest-tenured head coach, holding the position from 1960 to 1974. Marty Schottenheimer was hired in 1989 and led Kansas City to seven playoff appearances in his ten seasons as head coach. Gunther Cunningham served as the team's head coach in between stints as the team's defensive coordinator. Dick Vermeil coached the team to a franchise-best 9–0 start in the 2003 season. Of the thirteen Chiefs coaches, Hank Stram and Marv Levy have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Herman Edwards served as the team's head coach from 2006 to 2008, compiling a 15–33 record. Todd Haley, served his first season with the team in 2009, but was fired on December 12, 2011. Defensive Coordinator Romeo Crennel was named the team's interim head coach for the remaining 3 games of the season. Following the 2011 season Crennel was named permanent head coach. Crennel was fired after the 2012 season, having posted a 4–15 record as head coach. Before the 2013 season Andy Reid was hired after being let go by the Eagles after the 2012 season.

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