Todd Walker

Todd Arthur Walker (born May 25, 1973) is a former Major League Baseball infielder.

Todd Walker
Second baseman
Born: May 25, 1973 (age 46)
Bakersfield, California
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 30, 1996, for the Minnesota Twins
Last MLB appearance
May 10, 2007, for the Oakland Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.289
Home runs107
Runs batted in545
Teams
Career highlights and awards

College

Walker attended LSU where he led the Tigers to the 1993 national championship. He also earned the 1993 College World Series Most Outstanding Player award. In 2006, Walker was elected to the LSU Hall of Fame. In July 2009, Walker was inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame in Lubbock, Texas.[1]

On April 14, 2017, Walker's #12 LSU jersey was retired at Alex Box Stadium in Baton Rouge, LA.

Professional career

In 1994, the Minnesota Twins drafted Walker with the 8th pick in the 1st Round of the amateur draft. On August 30, 1996, Walker made his major league debut with the Twins. In 1998, Walker became the starting second baseman for the Twins, hitting .316 with 12 HR, 62 RBIs, and a career best 19 stolen bases.

Over the next season and a half, Walker's offensive performance began to decline, and the Twins traded Walker to the Colorado Rockies. He responded by hitting .316 through the rest of 2000 and .297 through the first half of 2001. Walker hit 12 home runs as a member of the Rockies that year.

The Cincinnati Reds, in need of a better performance from its second base position, traded for Walker in July 2001. Walker rewarded the Reds by providing consistent offense, hitting .295 through the end of the season. In 2002, Walker enjoyed another fine year, hitting .299 with 11 HR and 64 RBIs and setting career highs with 42 doubles and 155 games played.

Following the season, the Boston Red Sox hired Theo Epstein as their new General Manager. One of his first moves was trading for Walker. During 2003, Walker continued to provide consistent offense, hitting .283 with 13 HR and setting a career high with 85 RBIs. On September 23 that year, with the Red Sox trailing the Baltimore Orioles 5-2 in the ninth inning, Walker hit a two-out, two-strike, three-run home run off Jorge Julio to tie the game. (The Sox won, 6-5, on David Ortiz's walk-off home run in the tenth.)[2] The Red Sox made the playoffs and Walker stepped up his performance again; he hit .313 with three homers in the American League Division Series against the Oakland A's, and .370 with two more homers and hits in every game against the New York Yankees in the ALCS. The Red Sox were eliminated in 7 games. Walker's five postseason homers are still a Red Sox record. Despite his performance, Walker was allowed to leave, signing with the Chicago Cubs via free agency.

Over the next three seasons, Walker attempted to maintain his offensive performance with the Cubs, but found himself playing less and platooning with younger players. Walker hit .274 (2004), .305 (2005), and .277 (through July 2006). However, he began to share time at second base with other players like Neifi Pérez, and started to make appearances at first base and in the outfield.

At the end of July 2006, the San Diego Padres were attempting to make the playoffs while the Cubs were already out of the race. Before the non-waiver trade deadline, the Padres traded low-A pitching prospect José Ceda to the Cubs for Walker, who became the new starting third baseman. He hit .282 down the stretch and the Padres made the playoffs, but were eliminated in the first round by the St. Louis Cardinals.

In 2007, Walker attended spring training with the Padres. However, during the offseason, the Padres had restocked the team with more infielders and left-handed hitters and, after a poor performance during the exhibition season, Walker was released on March 27. On March 30, 2007, he signed with the Oakland A's.

On May 12, 2007, Walker was designated for assignment to make room for Dallas Braden and subsequently released.

From 2013 to 2015 Walker coached baseball at Calvary Baptist Academy in Shreveport, Louisiana.[3]

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-03-28. Retrieved 2009-07-06.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "September 23, 2003 Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox Box Score and Play by Play - Baseball-Reference.com". Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  3. ^ Anderson, Alex. "Todd Walker resigns as Calvary head coach". Retrieved 26 August 2016.

External links

1993 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college and high school). Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American and High School All-American teams. Baseball America magazine selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1993 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors. This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

1993 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1993 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1993 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its forty seventh year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The forty-seventh tournament's champion was LSU, coached by Skip Bertman. The Most Outstanding Player was Todd Walker of LSU.

1994 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college, and high school). Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American, and High School All-American teams. Baseball America magazine selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1994 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors. This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

1994 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1994 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1994 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its forty eighth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The forty-eighth tournament's champion was Oklahoma, coached by Larry Cochell. The Most Outstanding Player was Chip Glass of Oklahoma.

1998 Minnesota Twins season

Like many Twins teams of its half-decade, the 1998 Minnesota Twins neither impressed nor contended. The team finished with a 70-92 record, with subpar batting and pitching. The season was not without its bright spots, as individual players had solid seasons and Hall of Fame designated hitter Paul Molitor announced his retirement at the end of the season. Tom Kelly's team had plenty of lowlights, most notably David Wells' perfect game against the team on May 17 at Yankee Stadium.

1999 Minnesota Twins season

The 1999 Minnesota Twins began their season on a positive note, with Brad Radke getting the win in a 6-1 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. They finished the season in last place, with a poor record of 63-97.

2000 Colorado Rockies season

The Colorado Rockies' 2000 season was the eighth for the Rockies. They competed in the National League West. Buddy Bell was their manager. They played home games at Coors Field. They finished with a record of 82-80, 4th in the NL West.

2001 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 2001 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League Central. The Reds were managed by Bob Boone.

2003 American League Championship Series

The 2003 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was played between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees from October 8 to 16, 2003. The Yankees won the series four games to three to advance to the World Series, where they lost in six games to the National League champion Florida Marlins.

2003 Boston Red Sox season

The 2003 Boston Red Sox season was the 103rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 95 wins and 67 losses, six games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, and defeated the American League West champion Oakland Athletics in the ALDS. The Red Sox then lost to the Yankees in the ALCS.

The Red Sox led the major leagues in nearly all offensive categories, including runs scored (961), batting average (.289), on-base percentage (.360), and perhaps most impressively, a .491 team slugging percentage, which set a new record previously held by the 1927 Yankees. They also had 649 extra-base hits, the most ever by one team in a single season.

A Million Lights (Michael W. Smith album)

A Million Lights is a studio album by Christian recording artist Michael W. Smith released on February 16, 2018. It is his first pop album in over five years and a follow up to Wonder (2010). The album is a new musical direction for Smith and marks a departure from his previous sound.

Brent Butler

Justin Brent Butler (born February 11, 1978) is a retired Major League Baseball utility infielder.

Drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 3rd round of the 1996 MLB amateur draft, Butler made his Major League Baseball debut with the Colorado Rockies on July 4, 2001, and appeared in his final game on June 19, 2003.

During his first season at the Major League level, Butler compiled a .244 batting average in limited playing time. The Rockies manager at the time, Buddy Bell, used Butler primarily off of the bench as Todd Walker served as the Rockies starting second baseman. After Walker's departure from the team at the end of the 2001 season, Butler saw his greatest amount of playing time. During the 2002 season, Butler served as the Rockies starting second baseman. However, after compiling only a .259 batting average with a .287 OBP, the Rockies signed Ronnie Belliard as their starting second baseman for the 2003 season, relegating Butler to a reserve role again.

Once the 2003 season concluded, the Rockies released Butler. Although Butler competed at the minor league level for the St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Braves, and Tampa Bay Rays, he never returned to the major leagues since his Rockies release.

LSU Tigers baseball

The LSU Tigers baseball team represents Louisiana State University in NCAA Division I college baseball. The team participates in the West Division of the Southeastern Conference. It is one of the elite college baseball programs in the nation, ranking seventh all-time with 18 College World Series appearances and second all-time with six national championships (1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, and 2009). The Tigers play home games on LSU's campus at Alex Box Stadium, Skip Bertman Field, and they are currently coached by Paul Mainieri.

Louisiana State University Athletic Hall of Fame

The Louisiana State University Athletic Hall of Fame recognizes members of the LSU Tigers and Lady Tigers athletics program that have made a lasting impact on Louisiana State University (LSU). To be eligible for the Hall of Fame in the Athlete category, an individual must have earned a college degree and gained national distinction through superlative performance. Hall of Fame candidates must also have established a personal reputation for character and citizenship. To be eligible in the Coach/Administrator category, the individual must have made significant contributions to LSU Athletics and gained national distinction through exceptional accomplishments in his or her field of expertise while establishing an image that reflects favorably upon the University.

The Jack and Priscilla Andonie Museum located on the campus of LSU in Baton Rouge, Louisiana is the physical location of the Hall of Fame.

Stephen Todd Walker

Stephen Todd Walker (born May 10, 1966) is an American finance expert and author. He has an extensive background in alternative investments. He has written two books on the subject, Wave Theory For Alternative Investments: Riding The Wave with Hedge Funds, Commodities, and Venture Capital by McGraw-Hill in December 2010 and Understanding Alternative Investments: Creating Diversified Portfolios that Ride the Wave of Investment Success by Palgrave MacMillan in July 2014. Presently, he is a Senior Vice President at Royal Bank of Canada.

Todd Walker (cricketer)

Todd Walker (born 13 March 1998) is a South African cricketer. He made his List A debut for South Western Districts in the 2016–17 CSA Provincial One-Day Challenge on 12 March 2017. He made his first-class debut for South Western Districts in the 2016–17 Sunfoil 3-Day Cup on 23 March 2017. He made his Twenty20 debut for South Western Districts in the 2017 Africa T20 Cup on 25 August 2017.

Todd Walker (photographer)

Todd Walker (1917 – September 13, 1998) was an American photographer, printmaker and creator of artists' books who is known for his manipulated images and for his use of offset lithography to produce individual prints and limited-edition books of his work.

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