Todd Stottlemyre

Todd Vernon Stottlemyre (born May 20, 1965) is a former right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball, who played 15 seasons for the Toronto Blue Jays, Oakland Athletics, St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers, and Arizona Diamondbacks. He is the son of Mel Stottlemyre, former New York Yankees pitcher. His brother Mel Stottlemyre Jr. also pitched in the major leagues for the Kansas City Royals in 1990, and is currently the pitching coach for the Miami Marlins.

He was selected by the Blue Jays out of University of Nevada, Las Vegas as the third overall pick in the 1985 MLB draft.

Todd Stottlemyre
Pitcher
Born: May 20, 1965 (age 54)
Yakima, Washington
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 6, 1988, for the Toronto Blue Jays
Last MLB appearance
June 26, 2002, for the Arizona Diamondbacks
MLB statistics
Win–loss record138–121
Earned run average4.28
Strikeouts1,587
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Scouting report

His fastball, average (high) velocity, clocked around 92-93 mph. Stottlemyre possessed above-average control of his pitches. His style of pitching was direct - using an inside fastball to challenge opposing hitters. Furthermore, he possessed an above-average slider, curveball, and later on, a splitter (adopted from teammate Dave Stewart). As an above-average pitcher, Stottlemyre made a direct contribution to the Blue Jays' 1992 & 1993 World Series victories. His weaknesses as a pitcher, although subject to debate, were his predictability of confronting opposing hitters, pitches over the 'heart' of home plate, hittable fastballs, and flat curveballs. Changing speeds was not a part of his repertoire; Stottlemyre did not possess an effective changeup.

Baseball incidents

While pitching for the Blue Jays in Game 4 of the 1993 World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies, Stottlemyre tried to go from first to third on a single by Roberto Alomar. His baserunning skills indicated inexperience; he hesitated between second and third base. The attempt resulted in him being thrown/tagged out while sliding head-first into third base, and scraping his chin in the process. That prompted Ed Rendell, then the Mayor of Philadelphia, to ridicule Stottlemyre, while also adding that he could hit his pitches. After Stottlemyre and his teammates won the Series, Stottlemyre responded to the comment at the ensuing victory rally, expressing his displeasure with the mayor by declaring, "You can kiss my ass!".[1]

On February 20, 1994, Stottlemyre and Blue Jays teammate Dave Stewart were both arrested in Dunedin, Florida, for battery on a law enforcement officer and resisting arrest after an argument arose between Stewart, who was accompanied by Stottlemyre, at a night club, reportedly over Stewart's refusal to pay a $3 cover fee.[2][3]

Postbaseball career

Stottlemyre became interested in the stock market soon after receiving his signing bonus with the Blue Jays.[4] He hired long-time family friend Frank Aiello to manage his portfolio, where Aiello purchased shares in Pepsi prior to a 3:1 stock split.[4] After he was placed on the disabled list for the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2000, Stottlemyre began to get "really serious about trading".[4]

After retiring from baseball in 2002, Stottlemyre became a stock market analyst for Merrill Lynch.[5][6] Realizing that he was a better trader than investor, he began day trading and cites the mentorship of Joe Donohue and Brian Shannon with his success.[4] Later, he followed his dream of founding a hedge fund.[4]

As of 2010, Stottlemyre is a member of ACN Inc., operating a network within the multilevel marketing company selling telecommunications, energy, banking, and other services.[6] He is now a Platinum Regional Vice President of the company.

Stottlemyre serves on the board of directors for several companies.[4]

Stottlemyre is married with five children.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Video". CNN. February 28, 2000.
  2. ^ "Boxing". Los Angeles Times. February 22, 1994.
  3. ^ "Two Blue Jays arrested at Tampa night club. (Toronto Blue Jays' Dave Stewart, Todd Stottlemyre charged with battery, resisting arrest in Florida) (brief article)". Highbeam.com. 7 March 1994. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Staff (2009). "The face of trading: Play ball (Interview with Todd Stottlemyre)". Active Trader Magazine. 10 (7): 54.
  5. ^ Zwolinski, Mark (9 August 2009). "Jays reunion brings back memories for Cito Gaston". The Star. Toronto. Retrieved 2010-12-08.
  6. ^ a b Ladurantaye, Steve (16 March 2010). "Guess who's coming to dinner? Stottlemyre has a pitch for you". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Retrieved 2010-12-08.

External links

1989 Toronto Blue Jays season

The 1989 season was the Toronto Blue Jays' 13th season of Major League Baseball. It resulted in the Blue Jays finishing first in the American League East with a record of 89 wins and 73 losses. They lost the ALCS in five games to the eventual World Series champion Oakland Athletics. It was the team's last season at Exhibition Stadium, before moving to SkyDome halfway into the season. The Blue Jays hit eight grand slams, the most in MLB in 1989.

1993 American League Championship Series

The 1993 American League Championship Series was played between the East Division champion Toronto Blue Jays and the West Division champion Chicago White Sox from October 5 to 12. The defending champion Blue Jays defeated the White Sox, 4–2, to advance to the 1993 World Series which they would win 4–2 over the Philadelphia Phillies thanks to Joe Carter's dramatic three-run walk-off home run in Game 6. The 1993 ALCS was the last played under the AL's two-division format, as the league realigned into three divisions the following year.

1993 Toronto Blue Jays season

The 1993 Toronto Blue Jays season was the franchise's 17th season of Major League Baseball. It resulted in the Blue Jays finishing first in the American League East with a record of 95 wins and 67 losses. They were shut out only once in 162 regular-season games. The Blue Jays would repeat as World Champions and become the first back-to-back champions since the 1977–1978 New York Yankees. The American League Championship Series would see the Blue Jays play the Chicago White Sox. After defeating the White Sox in six games, the Blue Jays would beat the Philadelphia Phillies in the World Series, also in six games. The team would not qualify for the post-season again until the 2015 season.

This season marked the first time that a manager from the Blue Jays would manage the American League in the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. It was the 64th Mid-Summer Classic and was played on July 13 at Camden Yards in Baltimore with Cito Gaston leading the American League squad. John Olerud, Roberto Alomar, Joe Carter, and Paul Molitor were all starters for the American League. Pat Hentgen, Duane Ward and Devon White were named as reserves to the American League team. In the game, the American League defeated the National League by a score of 9–3. White, Alomar, Molitor, Carter and Olerud, batting first through fifth for most games, proved to be very strong offensively, and were nicknamed WAMCO. When Rickey Henderson joined the Jays on July 31, and was placed second in the batting order, the nickname (now for the first six in the batting order) was then able to be spelled WHAMCO.

1995 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1995 season was the team's 28th in Oakland, California. It was also the 95th season in franchise history. The team finished fourth in the American League West with a record of 67-77.

The Athletics, for a third consecutive year, found themselves mired in mediocrity. As had been the case in both 1993 and 1994, an average-to-poor offense (headlined by Mark McGwire, Rickey Henderson, and Rubén Sierra) was sabotaged by one of the league's worst pitching staffs. For a third consecutive season, no Athletics starter posted an earned run average (ERA) of less than 4.50; only one such starter, Todd Stottlemyre, managed to record double-digit wins in the strike-shortened campaign.

The Athletics, despite their weak pitching, managed to contend in the first half of the season. On July 1, a win over the division-leading California Angels brought them within 1.5 games of first place; it also ran their record to a surprising 34-28. As had been the case in 1994, the A's followed their surprising start with a prolonged slump; between July 2 and August 15, the team went only 13-28. The collapse, along with an Angels surge (the Angels went 30-11 over the same span) left the A's 17.5 games out of first place. As had also been the case in 1994, Oakland mounted a dramatic comeback; an Angels collapse, combined with a surge of their own, allowed them to pull within five games of first place on September 20. The September 20th victory would be their last, as Oakland lost each of the regular season's final nine games. They finished the campaign eleven games behind the AL West champion Seattle Mariners.

The Athletics' on-field mediocrity, however, contained a few bright spots. Mark McGwire clubbed 39 home runs in a mere 104 games; he would hit at least 50 in each of the four subsequent seasons. The 1995 season also saw the debut of future superstar Jason Giambi. Giambi, in his first major league season, batted .256 with six home runs in 54 games. Lastly, the season was Tony La Russa's last as Oakland's manager. He, along with most of the Athletics' assistant coaches, would join the St. Louis Cardinals in 1996.

1996 National League Championship Series

The 1996 National League Championship Series (NLCS) matched the East Division champion Atlanta Braves and the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals. It was the second NLCS meeting of the two teams and first since 1982. The Braves won in seven games, becoming the eighth team in baseball history to win a best-of-seven postseason series after being down 3–1, and first to overcome such a deficit in the NLCS. They outscored the Cardinals, 32–1, over the final three games. Also, Bobby Cox became the only manager to be on both the winning and losing end of such a comeback in postseason history, having previously blown the 1985 American League Championship Series with the Toronto Blue Jays against the Kansas City Royals.

The Braves would go on to lose to the New York Yankees in the World Series in six games.

1996 National League Division Series

The 1996 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1996 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Saturday, October 5, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 96–66) vs. (4) Los Angeles Dodgers (Wild Card, 90–72): Braves won series, 3–0.

(2) San Diego Padres (Western Division champion, 91–71) vs. (3) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champion, 88–74): Cardinals won series, 3–0.The St. Louis Cardinals and Atlanta Braves both swept their Division Series, and went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Braves would rally to win that series four games to three and become the National League champion, but would lose to the American League champion New York Yankees in the 1996 World Series.

1996 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1996 season was the team's 115th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 105th season in the National League. During the first year of the William DeWitt, Jr. era, the Cardinals went 88-74 during the season and won their first-ever National League Central division title by six games over the Houston Astros. They beat the San Diego Padres in the NLDS, but fell in 7 games to the Atlanta Braves in the NLCS. DeWitt, along with Drew Bauer and Fred Hanser had bought the Cardinals from Anheuser-Busch during the 1995-96 offseason.

1998 American League Division Series

The 1998 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1998 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 29, and ended on Saturday, October 3, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) New York Yankees (Eastern Division champion, 114–48) vs. (3) Texas Rangers (Western Division champion, 88–74): Yankees win series, 3–0.

(2) Cleveland Indians (Central Division champion, 89–73) vs. (4) Boston Red Sox (Wild Card, 92–70): Indians win series, 3–1.The New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Yankees became the American League champion, and defeated the National League champion San Diego Padres in the 1998 World Series.

1998 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1998 season was the team's 117th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 107th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 83-79 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League Central division, 18 games behind the Houston Astros. First baseman Mark McGwire broke Roger Maris' single-season home run record this season by hitting 70 home runs, battling with the Chicago Cubs' Sammy Sosa, who finished runner-up in the National League with 66.

1998 Texas Rangers season

The 1998 Texas Rangers season involved the Rangers finishing 1st in the American League west with a record of 88 wins and 74 losses. It would be the team's second post-season appearance, but the team would be swept 3-0 by the New York Yankees.

1999 Arizona Diamondbacks season

The 1999 Arizona Diamondbacks looked to improve on their 1998 expansion season. They looked to contend in what was a strong National League West Division. They finished the season with a highly surprising record of 100-62, good enough for the NL West division title. In the NLDS, however, they fell in four games to the New York Mets on Todd Pratt's infamous home run. Randy Johnson would win the NL Cy Young Award and become the third pitcher to win the Cy Young Award in both leagues.

1999 National League Division Series

The 1999 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1999 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 5, and ended on Saturday, October 9, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 103–59) vs. (3) Houston Astros (Central Division champion, 97–65): Braves win series, 3–1.

(2) Arizona Diamondbacks (Western Division champion, 100–62) vs. (4) New York Mets (Wild Card, 97–66): Mets win series, 3–1.The Diamondbacks were participating in the postseason in only their second year of existence, the fastest any expansion team had ever qualified. The Atlanta Braves and New York Mets went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Braves became the National League champion, and were defeated by the American League champion New York Yankees in the 1999 World Series.

Arizona Diamondbacks all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of May 10, 2016.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have played in at least in one game for the Arizona Diamondbacks franchise.

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Branch Rickey Award

The Branch Rickey Award was given annually to an individual in Major League Baseball (MLB) in recognition of his exceptional community service from 1992 to 2014. The award was named in honor of former player and executive Branch Rickey, who broke the major league color barrier by signing Jackie Robinson, while president and general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Rickey also created the Knothole Gang, a charity that allowed children to attend MLB games.The award, created by the Rotary Club of Denver in 1991, was first awarded to Dave Winfield in 1992 at their annual banquet. Each MLB team nominates one individual who best exemplifies the Rotary Club motto: "Service Above Self". A vote is then conducted by the national selection committee, which consists of members of the sports media, previous winners of the award, and Rotary district governors in major league cities. Proceeds of the banquet benefit Denver Kids, Inc., a charity for at-risk students who attend Denver Public Schools. Each winner receives a bronze sculpture of a baseball player measuring 24 inches (610 mm), named "The Player", designed by sculptor George Lundeen. A larger version of "The Player", standing 13 feet (4.0 m) tall, was erected at Coors Field in Denver.Winners of the Branch Rickey Award have undertaken different causes. Many winners, including Todd Stottlemyre, Jamie Moyer, John Smoltz, Torii Hunter, Vernon Wells, and Shane Victorino, worked with children in need. Stottlemyre visited and raised money for a nine-year-old girl who suffered from aplastic anemia and required a bone marrow transplant, while Moyer's foundation raised US$6 million to support underprivileged children. Other winners devoted their work to aiding individuals who had a specific illness, such as Curt Schilling, who raised money for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Trevor Hoffman, who lost a kidney as an infant and devoted himself to working with individuals with nephropathy. Also, some winners devoted themselves to work with major disasters and tragedies. Bobby Valentine donated money to charities benefiting victims of the September 11 attacks, while Luis Gonzalez worked with survivors of Hurricane Katrina.

List of Texas Rangers Opening Day starting pitchers

The Texas Rangers are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team based in Arlington, Texas. They play in the American League West division. The Rangers played their first 11 seasons, from 1961 to 1971, as the Washington Senators, one of three different major league teams to use the name. In Washington, D.C., the Senators played their home games at Griffith Stadium for their inaugural season before moving to Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium the following season. The team moved to Texas in 1972, and played their home games at Arlington Stadium until 1993. The team's current home, Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, has been the Rangers' home field since the start of the 1994 season. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day.The Senators/Rangers have used 30 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 52 seasons. The 30 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 18 wins, 26 losses and 8 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game or if the starting pitcher pitches fewer than five innings. Of the 7 no decisions, the Rangers went on to win five and lose three of those games, for a team record on Opening Day of 23 wins and 29 losses.Three Texas Rangers Opening Day pitchers—Ferguson Jenkins, Gaylord Perry and Nolan Ryan—have been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.The Senators' first Opening Day starting pitcher was Dick Donovan, who was credited with the loss against the Chicago White Sox in the game played at Griffith Stadium with President John F. Kennedy throwing out the ceremonial first pitch. Though the Senators ended the 1961 with a 61–100 record, 47½ games out of first place, Donovan ended the season leading the American League with a 2.40 ERA.In 1962, the team moved to District of Columbia Stadium (renamed Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in 1969), with Bennie Daniels on the mound for Opening Day. President Kennedy attended the Opening Day game, as the Senators defeated the Detroit Tigers by a score of 4–1. The Senators, and their starting pitchers, lost their next eight Opening Day games. Dick Bosman started on Opening Day for the Senators in 1971, their last season in Washington, D.C., and led the Senators to an 8–0 victory over Vida Blue and the Oakland Athletics.The Rangers advanced to the playoffs in 1996, 1998 and 1999. In each of those three seasons the Rangers faced the New York Yankees in the Divisional Series and lost. In 1996, Ken Hill was the Opening Day starter in a 5–3 win over the Boston Red Sox. In the 1996 American League Division Series, John Burkett started and won the opening game of the series by a 6–2 score, the only game the Rangers won in the series. Burkett was the Opening Day starter in 1998, in a game the Rangers lost 9–2 to the Chicago White Sox. In the 1998 American League Division Series, Todd Stottlemyre started and lost the first game of the series, which the Yankees swept in three games. Rick Helling was the Opening Day starter in 1999, losing 11–5 to the Detroit Tigers. In the 1999 American League Division Series, Aaron Sele was the starter in the opening game of the series, with the Rangers again swept by the Yankees.Kevin Millwood has pitched four consecutive Opening Day starts, in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009. Two other Rangers pitchers have pitched three consecutive Opening Day starts: Charlie Hough in 1987, 1988 and 1989 and Nolan Ryan in 1990, 1991 and 1992.Charlie Hough has the most Opening Day starts for the Rangers, with six, and has a record of three wins and one loss. Ken Hill and Kenny Rogers both won both of their decisions, for a perfect 2–0 record. Six other pitchers won their only decision. Colby Lewis had a win and a loss each in his two Opening Day starts. Kevin Millwood and Dick Bosman each lost three of their four Opening Day starts for the Rangers. Pete Richert, Camilo Pascual and Rick Helling each lost both of their starts. Ten pitchers have lost their only start.

Lou Gehrig Memorial Award

The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is given annually to a Major League Baseball (MLB) player who best exhibits the character and integrity of Lou Gehrig, both on the field and off it. The award was created by the Phi Delta Theta fraternity in honor of Gehrig, who was a member of the fraternity at Columbia University. It was first presented in 1955, fourteen years after Gehrig's death. The award's purpose is to recognize a player's exemplary contributions in "both his community and philanthropy." The bestowal of the award is overseen by the headquarters of the Phi Delta Theta in Oxford, Ohio, and the name of each winner is inscribed onto the Lou Gehrig Award plaque in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. It is the only MLB award conferred by a fraternity.Twenty-four winners of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The inaugural winner was Alvin Dark. Curt Schilling (1995) and Shane Victorino (2008) received the award for working with the ALS Association and raising money for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The disease took Gehrig's life and is eponymously known as "Lou Gehrig's disease". Mike Timlin won the award in 2007 for his efforts in raising awareness and finding a cure for ALS, which took his mother's life in 2002.Winners of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award have undertaken a variety of different causes. Many winners, including Rick Sutcliffe, Barry Larkin, Mark McGwire, Todd Stottlemyre and Derek Jeter, worked with children in need. Jeter assisted children and teenagers in avoiding drug and alcohol addiction through his Turn 2 Foundation, while Sutcliffe visited disabled children in hospitals and bestowed college scholarships to underprivileged juveniles through his foundation. Other winners devoted their work to aiding individuals who had a specific illness, such as Albert Pujols, whose daughter suffers from Down syndrome, and who devoted the Pujols Family Foundation to helping those with the disorder, and Ryan Zimmerman, who established the ziMS Foundation to raise money for multiple sclerosis, the disease which afflicts his mother.

Mark Little (baseball)

Mark Travis Little (born July 11, 1972 in Edwardsville, Illinois) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball. Little retired after the 2006 season, after playing for the Florida Marlins Triple-A affiliate, the Albuquerque Isotopes. He batted and threw right-handed.

After playing for the University of Memphis in college, Little was drafted by the Texas Rangers in the 8th round of the 1994 amateur draft. Little played four years in the Rangers minor league system, getting as high as Triple-A, before being traded on August 9, 1998, along with Darren Oliver and Fernando Tatís to the St. Louis Cardinals for Royce Clayton and Todd Stottlemyre. Little was assigned to the Cardinals Triple-A affiliate, the Memphis Redbirds, before making his major league debut on September 12, 1998. In 2000, he led the Triple-A Memphis Redbirds with 22 stolen bases.A free agent after the 2000 season, Little signed with the Colorado Rockies on November 7, 2000. 2002 saw Little get the most at bats in a single season of his entire career with 130; he did this playing for the Rockies, New York Mets, and Arizona Diamondbacks. He was acquired by the Mets along with John Thomson for Jay Payton, Mark Corey, and Robert Stratton. He was then dealt by the Mets to the Diamondbacks for P.J. Bevis. Little was released by the Diamondbacks on May 30, 2003, and signed with the Cleveland Indians on June 3, 2003. Little had his final 20 major league at bats playing for the Indians in 2004. He won the Governors' Cup with the Buffalo Bisons, the AAA affiliate of the Indians, in 2004. Released by Cleveland following the 2004 season, Little signed a minor league contract with the Florida Marlins on November 4, 2004. He played for the Marlins Triple-A affiliate, the Albuquerque Isotopes, during the 2005 and 2006 seasons, before retiring from Major League Baseball.

Mel Stottlemyre Jr.

Melvin Leon Stottlemyre Jr. (born December 28, 1963) is an American professional baseball pitching coach and a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, who played for the Kansas City Royals.

The 6 ft (1.8 m), 190 lb (86 kg), Stottlemyre attended the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. He is the son of former New York Yankees starting pitcher and longtime MLB pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre and the elder brother of Todd Stottlemyre, who won 138 games during a 14-year big-league career.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.