Todd Lyght

Todd William Lyght (born February 9, 1969) is a former professional American football player and current defensive backs coach for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish.

Lyght played in the NFL for 12 seasons from 1991 to 2002, finishing with 37 interceptions and 4 touchdowns. His best year as a pro came during the 1999 season with the Super Bowl champion St. Louis Rams, with whom he intercepted six passes for 112 yards and one touchdown and was named to the 1999 All-Pro and Pro Bowl teams.[1]

Todd Lyght
No. 41, 24
Position:Cornerback
Personal information
Born:February 9, 1969 (age 50)
Kwajalein, Marshall Islands
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Flint (MI) Powers Catholic
College:Notre Dame
NFL Draft:1991 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:37
INT yards:462
Touchdowns:4
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Born in Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, Lyght attended Powers Catholic High School in Flint, Michigan where he lettered twice as a wide receiver and defensive back. As a senior, he served as a team captain and caught 38 passes for 877 yards with nine touchdowns, and also intercepted 19 passes.[1] Lyght also lettered three times in track and field.

College career

Lyght played collegiate football for the University of Notre Dame, where he was a two-time consensus All-American (1989 and 1990).[2] He was a three-year starter at cornerback and was voted as a team captain his senior season.

He had more playing time in 1987 than any other freshman, making 29 tackles, causing one fumble, breaking up two passes and making one interception. Lyght was named a starter for his sophomore season, and led team in tackles in the 1989 Fiesta Bowl win over West Virginia. That victory capped an undefeated season for Notre Dame, leading to a #1 ranking in both the AP and coach's polls. As a result, the 1988 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team was named the consensus national champion.

As a junior in 1989, he intercepted eight passes (two shy of school record) and registered 47 total tackles (27 solo). He ranked eighth in final NCAA standings in 1989 for interceptions and was a finalist for 1989 Jim Thorpe Award. Lyght finished his college career with 161 tackles; caused one fumble; broke up 20.5 passes; had 11 interceptions for 55 return yards and one touchdown.[2] He also played in 1991 Hula Bowl.

Professional career

Pre-draft

Lyght was considered to be among the top players available in the 1991 NFL Draft. He measured 6-foot and 185-pounds and ran a 4.45-second 40-yard dash in pre-draft workouts, and was considered by some[3] to be the best athlete available. Rams defensive coordinator Jeff Fisher had Lyght rated as the top defensive player in the draft.[3]

Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams

Lyght was a first-round pick, fifth overall, of the Los Angeles Rams in the 1991 NFL Draft. He was the second cornerback drafted, following third overall pick Bruce Pickens. On August 16, 1991, after a training camp holdout, Lyght signed a five-year $5.6 million deal that made him the second-highest paid player on the Rams.[4] As a rookie in 1991, Lyght started the last eight games of the season at left cornerback after battling several early-season injuries. In 1992, he missed four games after dislocating his shoulder versus Miami On September 20. He was named the NFC Defensive Player of Week after posting nine tackles and two interceptions against the New England Patriots on September 13. In 1993, Lyght tied for team lead with two interceptions but suffered a knee injury in pregame drills on November 21 and was subsequently placed on injured reserve.

In 1994, he made most of first injury-free season; was fourth on team with 84 tackles (72 solo) and led team with 14 passes defensed. He scored the Rams first touchdown of season with 74-yard fumble return against the Arizona Cardinals on September 4. In 1995 the Rams moved to St. Louis, where he started 16 games at left cornerback and finished second on the team with a then-career-high of four interceptions.

On April 14, 1996, Lyght signed a new five-year $10.5 million contract with $4 million guaranteed in bonus and salary. That season Lyght established career-highs in tackles (105), interceptions (5) and pass breakups (19) and added 10 special teams tackles. In 1997, he started all 16 games at cornerback and participated on special teams; he finished third on team in tackles with 107 and second in passes defensed with 23, along with four interceptions, one sack, two forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. The next season, 1998, he again started all 16 games at left corner and played on special teams finishing fifth on team in tackles with 87, first in pass defensed with 20, along with three interceptions, 1½ sacks, and three forced fumbles.

In 1999 Lyght earned his first Pro Bowl selection was as a first-team All-Pro as well. He recorded 65 tackles and had 6 interceptions, 2½ sacks, 15 passes defenses and one forced fumble.[1] He scored his fourth career touchdown on a 57-yard interception return versus the Carolina Panthers on November 14, 1999. He also recorded 22 tackles, had one interception and deflected 5 passes in the playoffs as the Rams went on to win Super Bowl XXXIV. He also blocked a field goal attempt in the Super Bowl.

Detroit Lions

On April 12, 2001, Lyght signed a two-year $2.5 million contract with the Detroit Lions.[5] He had a fine season with the Lions in 2001, starting 16 games and making 59 tackles and intercepting four passes, one he returned for a touchdown. In 2002, he played in 16 games and started 14, making 99 tackles and picking off two passes. On December 29, 2002, Lyght set an NFL record for being the oldest player to return a blocked field goal for a touchdown (33 years, 323 days). It was the sixth defensive touchdown in Lyght's career (along with four touchdowns off of interceptions and one from a fumble recovery).

Lyght retired from the NFL following the 2002 season.[6]

Statistics

Year Team Games Combined Tackles Tackles Assisted Tackles Sacks Forced Fumbles Fumble Recoveries Fumble Return Yards Interceptions Interception Return Yards Yards per Interception Return Longest Interception Return Interceptions Returned for Touchdown Passes Defended
1991 LOS 12 0 0 0 0.0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
1992 LOS 12 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 3 80 27 39 0 0
1993 LOS 9 43 40 3 0.0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 9
1994 LOS 16 85 73 12 0.0 0 1 0 1 14 14 14 0 13
1995 STL 16 81 71 10 0.0 1 0 0 4 34 9 29 1 11
1996 STL 16 82 69 13 0.0 0 0 0 5 43 9 25 1 19
1997 STL 16 85 72 13 1.0 2 2 0 4 25 6 13 0 16
1998 STL 16 66 53 13 1.5 2 0 0 3 30 10 17 0 11
1999 STL 16 65 53 12 2.5 1 0 0 6 112 19 57 1 13
2000 STL 14 53 47 6 1.0 1 0 0 2 21 11 21 0 8
2001 DET 16 59 53 6 0.0 0 1 0 4 72 18 59 1 9
2002 DET 16 99 84 15 0.0 0 0 0 2 31 16 31 0 17
Career 175 718 615 103 6.0 7 6 0 37 462 12 59 4 126

[7]

Coaching career

Lyght began a career in coaching in 2009, following several years of working in private business and as a football analyst on radio. His first position was as an assistant football coach at Bishop Gorman High School in Summerlin, Nevada on the staff of head coach Tony Sanchez. While on staff, the team won back-to-back state championships in 2009 and 2010.

In 2011, Lyght joined the staff at the University of Oregon as a defensive intern under head coach Chip Kelly. Lyght was initially contacted about the open position by Ducks defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti, who happened to be an assistant coach with the Rams during Lyght's playing days.[8]

Lyght was named assistant defensive backs coach for the Philadelphia Eagles of the NFL in 2013.[9] The hiring reunited him with Eagles head coach Chip Kelly, who had departed Oregon for the Eagles following the 2012 season.

Following the 2014 season, Lyght was hired by Vanderbilt to be their cornerbacks coach.[10]

In February 2015, Lyght was hired by the University of Notre Dame to replace Kerry Cooks as defensive backs coach.[11]

Personal

Lyght established a series of scholarships at St. Mary's Elementary (Alexandria, Virginia), Powers Catholic High School, and the University of Notre Dame.[12] In 1995, he donated $50,000 to the United Negro College Fund as part of NFL's Golden Circle.[1]

Lyght and his wife Stefanie have two children, son Logan and daughter Luca.

References

  1. ^ a b c d http://legacy.philadelphiaeagles.com/eagles_files/html/lyght_1.html
  2. ^ a b http://www.und.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/lyght_todd00.html
  3. ^ a b "Rams Can See Lyght at Corner". Los Angeles Times. April 22, 1991.
  4. ^ "Rookie Lyght Becomes No. 2 in Ram Salaries". Los Angeles Times. August 17, 1991.
  5. ^ "Lions Sign Cornerback Lyght". Chicago Tribune. April 13, 2001.
  6. ^ http://www.upi.com/Sports_News/2002/12/30/Lions-CB-Todd-Lyght-retires/UPI-36951041306613/
  7. ^ "Todd Lyght Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved 4 April 2014.
  8. ^ http://projects.registerguard.com/web/sports/26168995-41/lyght-football-oregon-ducks-intern.html.csp
  9. ^ http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/hofmann/Shining-a-Lyght-on-the-Eagles-secondary.html
  10. ^ http://www.tennessean.com/story/sports/college/vanderbilt/2015/01/07/reports-former-nfl-player-todd-lyght-vandy-cbs-coach/21416145/
  11. ^ http://notredame.247sports.com/Article/Todd-Lyght-Expected-To-Join-Notre-Dame-Staff-35423374
  12. ^ "Football". Los Angeles Times. May 2, 1992.
1988 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1988 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Irish, coached by Lou Holtz, ended the season with 12 wins and no losses, winning the national championship. The Fighting Irish won the title by defeating the previously unbeaten and No. 3 ranked West Virginia Mountaineers in the Sunkist Fiesta Bowl in Tempe, Arizona, by a score of a 34–21. The 1988 squad, one of 11 national title squads for the Irish, is considered to be one of the best undefeated teams in the history of college football. The Irish beat the teams which finished the season ranked #2, #4, #5, and #7 in the AP Poll. They also won 10 of 12 games by double digits. The 1988 squad is best remembered for its 31-30 upset of No. 1 ranked Miami, ending their 36-game regular season winning streak. The game is remembered to this day as one of the most memorable games in all of college football.

1989 College Football All-America Team

The 1989 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1989. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1989 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News, the Gannett News Service, Newspaper Enterprise Association in conjunction with World Almanac, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1990 College Football All-America Team

The 1990 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1990. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1990 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News, the Gannett News Service, Newspaper Enterprise Association in conjunction with World Almanac, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1990 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1990 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1990 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Lou Holtz and played its home games at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana.

1991 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1991 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 54th year with the National Football League and the 46th season in Los Angeles. The team was looking to improve on its 5-11 record from 1990. However, the Rams finished the 1991 season 3-13, tied for the second worst record in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. After splitting their first 6 games, the Rams lost their final 10 games of the season, their longest losing streak to end a season since 1937, when the team was in Cleveland, when the team lost 9 in a row to end that season. The 3-13 record was the worst for the Rams in Los Angeles for a 16-game schedule and they tied the third-fewest posted by the team in its tenure in the city. This was also, at the time, the worst record for the Rams in a 16-game schedule overall (not including the 1982 strike-shortened season).

The 1991 Rams' pass defense surrendered 7.86 yards-per-pass attempt (including quarterback sacks), the fourth-most in the history of the league.

1996 St. Louis Rams season

The 1996 St. Louis Rams season was the franchise’s 59th year with the National Football League (NFL) and the second season in St. Louis. It was marked by a 59–16 victory over the Atlanta Falcons in week 11. The Rams’ point tally in that game was the highest by an NFL team since 1989, when the Cincinnati Bengals scored 61 points. Safety Keith Lyle tied first for the league lead in interceptions, with 9. However, the Rams finished the season with a 6–10 record. Head coach Rich Brooks was fired after the season

1997 St. Louis Rams season

The 1997 St. Louis Rams season was the team's 60th year with the National Football League (NFL) and the third season in St. Louis. Still struggling to find answers, the Rams looked to improve on their 6–10 record from 1996 and make the playoffs for the first time since 1989, when the team was still based in Anaheim. The Rams started out the season mediocre, splitting their first four games. However, after beating the Giants at home, things began to unravel, as the Rams lost their next eight games before winning three of their last four to end the season 5–11. This was Dick Vermeil’s first season as head coach of the Rams.

1998 St. Louis Rams season

The 1998 St. Louis Rams season was the team’s 61st year with the National Football League (NFL) and the fourth season in St. Louis. It was the second year for head coach Dick Vermeil. The team failed to improve on its 5–11 record from 1997, and instead finished the season 4–12 and missed the playoffs for the ninth consecutive season, during which they had compiled a league-worst 45–99 record. Despite all of this, the Rams showed many signs of life during the season when they beat playoff teams such as the New York Jets (who would make the AFC Championship game during the season) and the New England Patriots (who would make a wild card). Some skeptics claim that those 2 wins helped them build signs of strong life into next season, when they won Super Bowl XXXIV over the Tennessee Titans.

1999 All-Pro Team

The 1999 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1999. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1999 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

2000 Pro Bowl

The 2000 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1999 season. The game was played on February 6, 2000 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii Attendance— 50,112. The game was broadcast by ABC with a running time of three hours and sixteen minutes. The final score was NFC 51, AFC 31. The AFC coach was Tom Coughlin of Jacksonville.

The NFC coach was Tony Dungy of Tampa Bay. Randy Moss of the Minnesota Vikings was the game's MVP with 9 catches for 212 yards and one touchdown.

The referee was Tom White.

2015 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 2015 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame in the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Brian Kelly and played its home games at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana. They competed as an independent.

The 2015 Fighting Irish squad was arguably the most explosive offense that Brian Kelly has coached at Notre Dame. During the regular season, the Irish were one of twenty-one schools in the country to average 200 or more passing yards and rushing yards per game. The Irish had fourteen plays of over 50 yards during the season, which ranked 13th in the country and was a school record. They also had two touchdowns of over 90 yards, (a 91-yard touchdown run by C.J. Prosise and a 98-yard touchdown run by Josh Adams). The Irish only had two in the previous 126 years of Notre Dame football. The running game was dominant. The 5.76 yards per carry were fifth in the country. They finished the regular season averaging 34 points per game, including a 62-point effort against UMass, the most points in a game since 1996.

The Irish were defeated by Ohio State in the Fiesta Bowl by a score of 44–28.

Leicht

Leicht is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Don Leicht (born 1946), American artist

Helmut Leicht (1916–1944), German officer in the Luftwaffe

Jacob Leicht (Wisconsin) (1876-1941), American politician

Jake Leicht (1919–1992), American football player

Stephen Leicht (born 1987), American stock car driver

Stina Leicht, American author

Light (surname)

Light is a surname of English language.

List of Los Angeles Rams players

The following is a list of notable past players of the Los Angeles Rams, formerly the St. Louis Rams and the Cleveland Rams.

Los Angeles Rams awards

This page details awards won by the Los Angeles Rams American football team. The Rams were formerly based in St. Louis (1995–2015) and Cleveland (1936–1942, 1944–1945), as well as Los Angeles (1946–1994, 2016–present).

Notre Dame Fighting Irish football statistical leaders

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Fighting Irish represent the University of Notre Dame as an Independent in the NCAA.

Although Notre Dame began competing in intercollegiate football in 1887, records from the early years are often incomplete and inconsistent and may not appear on this list. Notre Dame's official record book does not list a specific "modern era" beginning in a certain year, and the records listed below can go as far back as 1900, although they may not be complete.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1940s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Fighting Irish have played in 11 bowl games since then, allowing more recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Stan Smagala

Stanley Adam Smagala (born April 6, 1968) is a former American football safety in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Pittsburgh Steelers. He played college football at the University of Notre Dame.

Steve Brown (American football)

Steven Douglas Brown (born March 20, 1960) is a former American football cornerback who is currently the defensive backs coach for East Tennessee State University. Brown played his entire pro football career with the Houston Oilers from 1983 to 1990. He played college football at Oregon.

Super Bowl XXXIV

Super Bowl XXXIV was an American football game between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion St. Louis Rams and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Tennessee Titans to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1999 season. The Rams defeated the Titans by the score of 23–16, capturing their first Super Bowl win and first NFL championship since 1951. The game, played on January 30, 2000 at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, was the fourth Super Bowl to be held a week after the conference championship games (the previous time this happened was Super Bowl XXVIII, and coincidentally that game was also played on January 30 at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta).The Rams entered their second Super Bowl in team history with an NFC-best 13–3 regular season record. It was the franchise's first playoff appearance since 1989, when they were still in Los Angeles. The Titans, who were originally the Houston Oilers, also finished the regular season with a 13–3 record, but advanced to their first Super Bowl in team history after entering the playoffs as a wild-card team. Tennessee finished in second place in the AFC Central division behind the 14–2 Jacksonville Jaguars.The first two quarters of Super Bowl XXXIV were largely a defensive battle. Despite outgaining the Titans in total offensive yards in the first half, 294–89, the Rams held only a 9–0 halftime lead on three field goals. St. Louis later scored their first touchdown midway through the 3rd quarter to go up 16–0. Tennessee then responded by scoring 16 consecutive points to tie the game with 2:12 left in regulation---it was the largest deficit to be erased in a Super Bowl and the first greater than 10 points. On the Rams' ensuing drive, quarterback Kurt Warner completed a 73-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Isaac Bruce to regain the lead. The Titans then drove to the St. Louis 10-yard line with six seconds remaining, but on the final play of the game, Rams linebacker Mike Jones tackled Tennessee wide receiver Kevin Dyson one yard short of the goal line to prevent a potential game-tying drive. This play went into NFL lore as One Yard Short, or simply The Tackle. Warner was named Super Bowl MVP, becoming the sixth player to win both that award and the NFL MVP during the same season. At the time, his 414 passing yards and 45 pass attempts without an interception broke Super Bowl records.As of 2018, this was the most recent Super Bowl that featured two teams who never won the title before.

This game is often referred to as the "Dot-com Super Bowl" due to the large amount of advertisements purchased by dot-com companies. This game was later featured as one of NFL's Greatest Games as The Longest Yard.

Offense
Defense
Special teams
Offense
Defense
Special teams

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