Tirta Empul

Tirta Empul temple (Indonesian: Pura Tirta Empul) is a Hindu Balinese water temple located near the town of Tampaksiring, Bali, Indonesia. The temple compound consists of a petirtaan or bathing structure, famous for its holy spring water, where Balinese Hindus go to for ritual purification. The temple pond has a spring which gives out fresh water regularly, which Balinese Hindus consider to be holy or amritha.[1] Tirta Empul means Holy Spring in Balinese.

Around Ubud, Pura Tirta Empul (6985858921)
Ritual purifying bath at Tirta Empul.
Tirta Empul Gate
Gate at Tirta Empul

Construction of the temple

Tirta Empul Temple was founded around a large water spring in 962 A.D. during the Warmadewa dynasty (10th-14th centuries). The name of the temple comes from the ground water source named "Tirta Empul". The spring is the source of the Pakerisan river.[2] The temple is divided into three sections: Jaba Pura (front yard), Jaba Tengah (central yard) and Jeroan (inner yard). Jaba Tengah contains 2 pools with 30 showers which are named accordingly: Pengelukatan, Pebersihan and Sudamala dan Pancuran Cetik (poison).[3]

The temple is dedicated to Vishnu, another Hindu god name for the supreme consciousness Narayana.[1] On a hill overlooking the temple, a modern villa was built for President Sukarno's visit in 1954. The villa is currently a rest house for important guests.

Pura Tirta Empul, Bali
Tirtha Empul Temple - Purification
RITampTirtaEmpulS2

Water quality

For most of the time, Tirta Empul is believed as a source of clean water regarded as holy water used for Hindu ritual. However, the water quality began to deteriorate due to contamination from surrounding areas. As of August 2017, visitors are urged not to use the facilities on-site due to E.coli contamination of the water,[4] caused by nearby residents dumping their garbage carelessly onto open water, and sewage channel to the river. The contamination may have resulted in at least one person developing a severe eye infection and nearly losing their eyesight from an aggressive infection.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Pura Tirta Empul". Burari Bali. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  2. ^ Carroll, Ryan Ver Berkmoes, Adam Skolnick, Marian (2009). Bali & Lombok (12th ed.). Footscray, Vic.: Lonely Planet. p. 202. ISBN 9781742203133. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  3. ^ Pura Tirta Empul, babadbali.com
  4. ^ "E.coli found in Bali temple water has Gianyar regency focusing on water quality standards". Coconuts Bali. 5 July 2017.
  5. ^ Laura Baker (2 August 2017). "Infected by Bali holy water, woman endures torturous treatment to save sight".

Coordinates: 8°24′59″S 115°18′53″E / 8.41639°S 115.31472°E

Bali

Bali is a province of Indonesia and the westernmost of the Lesser Sunda Islands. Located east of Java and west of Lombok, the province includes the island of Bali and a few smaller neighbouring islands, notably Nusa Penida, Nusa Lembongan, and Nusa Ceningan. The provincial capital, Denpasar, is the most populous city in the Lesser Sunda Islands and the second largest, after Makassar, in Eastern Indonesia. Bali is the only Hindu-majority province in Indonesia, with 83.5% of the population adhering to Balinese Hinduism.Bali is Indonesia's main tourist destination, which has seen a significant rise in tourists since the 1980s. Tourism-related business makes up 80% of its economy. It is renowned for its highly developed arts, including traditional and modern dance, sculpture, painting, leather, metalworking, and music. The Indonesian International Film Festival is held every year in Bali. In March 2017, TripAdvisor named Bali as the world's top destination in its Traveller's Choice award.Bali is part of the Coral Triangle, the area with the highest biodiversity of marine species. In this area alone, over 500 reef-building coral species can be found. For comparison, this is about seven times as many as in the entire Caribbean. Most recently, Bali was the host of the Miss World 2013 and 2018 Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group. Bali is the home of the Subak irrigation system, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is also home to a unified confederation of kingdoms composed of 10 traditional royal Balinese houses, each house ruling a specific geographic area. The confederation is the successor of the Bali Kingdom. The royal houses are not recognised by the government of Indonesia; however, they originated before Dutch colonisation.

Balinese architecture

Balinese architecture is a vernacular architecture tradition of Balinese people that inhabits volcanic island of Bali, Indonesia. The Balinese architecture is a centuries-old architectural tradition influenced by Balinese culture developed from Hindu influences through ancient Javanese intermediary, as well as pre-Hindu elements of native Balinese architecture.Today, contemporary Balinese style is known as one of the most popular Asian tropical architecture, due largely to the growth of the tourism industry in Bali that has created demand for Balinese-style houses, cottages, villas and hotels. Contemporary Balinese architecture combines traditional aesthetic principles, island's abundance of natural materials, famous artistry and craftmanship of its people, as well as international architecture influences, new techniques and trends.

Balinese temple

A pura is a Balinese Hindu temple, and the place of worship for the adherents of Balinese Hinduism in Indonesia. Puras are built in accordance to rules, style, guidance and rituals found in Balinese architecture. Most of the puras are found on the island of Bali, as Hinduism is the predominant religion on it; however many puras exist in other parts of Indonesia where there are significant numbers of Balinese people. Mother Temple of Besakih is the most important, the largest and holiest temple in Bali. A large number of puras have been built in Bali, leading it to be titled "the Island of a Thousand Puras".

Public bathing

Public baths originated from a communal need for cleanliness at a time when most people did not have access to private bathing facilities. The term "public" is not completely accurate, as some types of public baths are restricted depending on membership, gender, religious affiliation, or other reasons. As societies have changed, the need for public baths has reduced: dwellings now have their own private bathroom. Public baths have also become incorporated into the social system as meeting places. As the title suggests, public bathing does not refer only to bathing. In ancient times public bathing included saunas, massages and relaxation therapies, comparable to today's spas.

Pura Beji Sangsit

Pura Beji Sangsit is a Balinese temple or pura located in Sangsit, Buleleng, on the island of Bali, Indonesia. The village of Sangsit is located around 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) east of Singaraja. Pura Beji is dedicated to the rice goddess Dewi Sri, and is revered especially by the farmers around the area. Pura Beji is an example of a stereotypical northern Balinese architecture with its relatively heavier decorations than it is soutnern Balinese counterpart, and its typical foliage-like carvings.

Subak (irrigation)

Subak is the water management (irrigation) system for paddy fields on Bali island, Indonesia which was developed in the 9th century. For the Balinese, irrigation is not simply providing water for the plant's roots, but water is used to construct a complex, pulsed artificial ecosystem. The system consists of five terraced rice fields and water temples covering nearly 20,000 hectares (49,000 acres). The temples are the main focus of this cooperative water management, known as subak.

Tampaksiring

Tampaksiring is a town in central Bali, Gianyar Regency, Indonesia. It is the home to the Gunung Kawi Temple and archaeological site and the Senang Hati Foundation.

The word "Tampak" in Balinese means foot, while "Siring" means Oblique. According to the legend the slope of the mountain where the town stands today, was created by footstep of a king named Mayadenawa. Tampaksiring was also one of the major kingdom during Bali's pre-colonial period. The town is home to Tirta Empul Temple

Villages around Tampaksiring are: Manukaya, Pejeng, Pejeng Kaja, Pejeng Kangin, Pejeng Kawan, Pejeng Kelod, Sanding, and Tampaksiring.

Tampaksiring Palace

The Tampaksiring Palace (Indonesian: Istana Tampaksiring) is one of 6 Presidential Palaces of Indonesia, it is located in Tampaksiring, Gianyar Regency, Bali. Built in 1957 and finished in 1963, unlike other presidential palaces of Indonesia that mostly were inherited from the colonial period of Dutch East Indies, Istana Tampaksiring was built after the independence of Indonesia, and built not in colonial Indies Empire style, but in modernism combined with elements of Balinese architecture.The buildings of the complex are scattered around on an area covering 19 hectare. The main palace building are built on a higher ground overlooking Tampaksiring Tirta Empul Temple and Mount Agung.

Wish tree

A wish tree is an individual tree, usually distinguished by species, position or appearance, which is used as an object of wishes and offerings. Such trees are identified as possessing a special religious or spiritual value. Postulants make votive offerings in hopes of having a wish granted, or a prayer answered, from a nature spirit, saint or goddess, depending on the local tradition.

Candi
Pura
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