Timothy B. Schmit

Timothy Bruce Schmit (born October 30, 1947) is an American musician, singer, and songwriter. He has performed as the bassist and vocalist for Poco and the Eagles, having replaced bassist and vocalist Randy Meisner in both cases. Schmit has also worked for decades as a session musician and solo artist. In 1998, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Eagles.

Timothy B. Schmit
Timothy B. Schmit
Schmit performing with the Eagles in 2008.
Background information
Birth nameTimothy Bruce Schmit
BornOctober 30, 1947 (age 71)
Oakland, California, US
Genres
Occupation(s)Musician, songwriter
InstrumentsVocals, bass guitar, guitar
Years active1960–present
Associated actsEagles, Poco, Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band, Steely Dan, Toto, Jimmy Buffett, Coral Reefer Band, Twisted Sister, Poison
Websitetimothybschmit.com
Eagles
Schmit (far right) with Eagles, during their 2008/09 Long Road Out of Eden Tour

Early life

Schmit was born in Oakland, California.[1] He was raised in Sacramento, and began playing in the folk music group Tim, Tom & Ron[1] at the age of 15. That group evolved into a surf band called the Contenders, then changed its name to the New Breed (sometimes known simply as "the Breed"). As the New Breed, they had one big radio hit: the Animals-inspired "Green Eyed Woman," which was released in 1965. Changing its name once again to Glad, the group recorded the album Feelin' Glad in 1968.

In 1968, Schmit auditioned for Poco but was turned down in favor of founding member Randy Meisner. When Meisner quit the band in 1969, Schmit replaced him on bass and vocals.[2] He appeared on nine of Poco's studio albums and two live albums between 1969 and 1977, composing numerous songs. He wrote and was the lead singer on the song "Keep on Tryin'," Poco's biggest hit single to that point, peaking at #50 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1975. Apart from Poco, Schmit also contributed vocals to Firefall's 1977 hit, "Just Remember I Love You."[3]

Schmit also sang backing vocals on the Steely Dan albums Pretzel Logic, The Royal Scam and Aja.[4] Schmit also sang backing vocals on "Never Let Her Slip Away", a top 5 UK hit for Andrew Gold in 1978, along with Brock Walsh, J.D. Souther and an uncredited Freddie Mercury.[5][6][7][8][9][10]

Tenure with the Eagles

In 1977, Schmit joined the Eagles after the Hotel California tour, once again replacing Randy Meisner on bass/vocals after Meisner quit. Although the Eagles are thought of as a quintessential California band, Schmit is the only member of the group to actually be a native of California.[11][12]

On the 1979 album, The Long Run, Schmit co-wrote and sang lead vocals on the song "I Can't Tell You Why". The band later broke up in 1980 and reunited 14 years later in 1994, with Schmit singing the lead vocals on "Love Will Keep Us Alive", on the reunion album Hell Freezes Over.

In 2007, the Eagles released a new album, Long Road Out of Eden. Schmit continued to be part of the Eagles lineup along with Don Henley, Glenn Frey and Joe Walsh until Frey's death in 2016.

Career after the Eagles

Eagles, Timothy B. Schmit's Bag of Hotel Keys - Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (2014-12-30 12.29.03 by Sam Howzit)
Timothy B. Schmit's Bag of Hotel Keys - Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

After the Eagles broke up in 1980, Schmit embarked on a solo career, singing vocals and playing bass for hire during studio sessions. His voice can be heard on many hits, including Bob Seger's "Fire Lake" and Boz Scaggs' "Look What You've Done to Me" (each with Frey and Henley), Don Felder's "Heavy Metal (Takin' a Ride)" (with Henley), and Crosby, Stills and Nash's "Southern Cross", where he sang harmony. He was also a background musician on two of Don Henley's hit songs, "Dirty Laundry" and "You Don't Know Me at All".

Schmit teamed with his predecessor in both Poco and the Eagles, Randy Meisner, along with their mutual Eagles bandmate Joe Walsh, to provide background vocals to the Richard Marx 1987 hit "Don't Mean Nothing". Schmit also performed on the Toto 1983 hit singles "I Won't Hold You Back" and "Africa", and the Jars of Clay song "Everything in Between". He also played on the 1983 Glenn Shorrock solo album. In 1991 Schmit covered the standard "I Only Have Eyes for You" for the soundtrack of the film Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead. In 1988 he added background vocals to Sheena Easton's album The Lover in Me and in 1989 Schmit added background vocals on the Stacey Q single, "Heartbeat", which was featured on her critically acclaimed Nights Like This album.

Schmit toured with Toto in 1982 and with Jimmy Buffett, in 1983, 1984, and 1985 as a member of the Coral Reefer Band, and coined the term "Parrotheads" to describe Buffett's fans. He was a member of Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band in 1992. In 1993, he contributed background vocals to several tracks on Clint Black's No Time to Kill CD including the title cut. In 1996, he sang on a cover version of The Beach Boys' 1966 song "Caroline, No" on their album Stars and Stripes Vol. 1, with the Beach Boys themselves contributing harmonies. In 2000, he toured with Dan Fogelberg; recordings from that tour became a live album, "Dan Fogelberg Live." Schmit sang harmony on the title track of Katy Rose's debut album, Because I Can, produced by fellow Poco alumnus and Katy's father, Kim Bullard.

Schmit's fifth studio album, Expando, was released on October 20, 2009.

In May 2012, Schmit was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Music from Berklee College of Music.[13]

His latest album, Leap of Faith, was released on September 23, 2016, the first release of an Eagles member since the death of bandmate Glenn Frey in January 2016.

Personal life

Schmit has three children: a daughter by his first wife and a daughter and son by his present wife.[14]

Discography

Studio albums

Year Album details Peak positions
US US Heat
1984 Playin' It Cool 160 1
1987 Timothy B
  • Second studio album
  • Release date: September 7, 1987
  • Label: MCA Records
106 1
1990 Tell Me the Truth
  • Third studio album
  • Release date: July 24, 1990
  • Label: MCA Records
2001 Feed the Fire
  • Fourth studio album
  • Release date: May 1, 2001
  • Label: Lucan Records
2009 Expando 43
2016 Leap of Faith
  • Sixth studio album
  • Release date: September 23, 2016
  • Label: Benowen Records
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

Singles

Year Single Peak positions Album
US
[15]
US Main US AC CAN CAN AC
1982 "So Much in Love" 59 27 Playin' It Cool
1984 "Playin' It Cool" 101
1987 "Boys Night Out" 25 17 69 Timothy B.
1988 "Don't Give Up" 30 22
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

References

  1. ^ a b Eder, Bruce. "Timothy B. Schmit > Biography". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-07-01.
  2. ^ Eder, Bruce. "Randy Meisner > Biography". allmusic. Retrieved 2009-11-14.
  3. ^ DeGagne, Mike. "Luna Sea > Review". allmusic. Retrieved 2009-11-15.
  4. ^ "SteelyDan.com". Retrieved 2013-10-28.
  5. ^ "Top 500". Smooth Radio. Archived from the original on April 10, 2015. Retrieved 2 September 2016.
  6. ^ Sweeting, Adam. Andrew Gold obituary. The Guardian. 6 June 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  7. ^ "Never Let Her Slip Away". Johnnie Walker's Sounds of the 70s. BBC Radio 2. 5 Feb 2012.
  8. ^ O'Neal, Sean. R.I.P. Andrew Gold, songwriter of "Lonely Boy" and The Golden Girls theme. The A.V. Club. 6 June 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2013.
  9. ^ Singer/Songwriter Andrew Gold Dies. Contactmusic. 6 June 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  10. ^ Drive with Russell Woolf; Andrew Gold – Lonely Boy Archived March 10, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 16 June 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2013.
  11. ^ "Timothy B. Schmit Biography". Timothybschmitonline.com. Retrieved 2014-05-24.
  12. ^ "Timothy B. Schmit went from envying the Eagles to becoming one". LancasterOnline.com. Retrieved June 10, 2014.
  13. ^ "Berklee Music Students Perform For The Eagles - Noise11.com". www.noise11.com. Retrieved March 29, 2018.
  14. ^ "Timothy B. Schmit Online Fun Facts". Timothybschmitonline.com. Retrieved 2014-05-24.
  15. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2011). Top Pop Singles 1955–2010. Record Research, Inc. p. 789. ISBN 0-89820-188-8.

External links

Cantamos

Cantamos is the seventh studio album by the country rock band Poco. It was released in 1974 on Epic Records.

Expando

Expando is the fifth studio album released by American musician Timothy B. Schmit. The album was released on October 20, 2009 on Lost Highway Records. It is Schmit's first studio album since 2001's Feed the Fire.

Schmit wrote all the songs himself and recorded them in his home studio.

Feed the Fire (Timothy B. Schmit album)

Feed the Fire is the fourth studio album by Timothy B. Schmit and it was released in 2001.

Head over Heels (Poco album)

Head over Heels is the eighth studio album by the American country rock band Poco, and their first on ABC Records. Schmit's "Keep On Tryin'" shows off the band's skills in harmonizing and became a cut that the band played in concert for many years. It also contains Rusty Young performing his first lead vocal on a Poco album on the track "Us", and a recording of the rare Steely Dan song "Dallas".

I Can't Tell You Why

"I Can't Tell You Why" is a song by the American rock band Eagles which appeared on their 1979 album The Long Run. The song was written by band members Timothy B. Schmit, Glenn Frey, and Don Henley. Recorded in March 1978, it was the first song finished for the album and the first Eagles song to feature Schmit on lead vocals. The studio version became a Billboard Top 10 hit in April 1980, reaching number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 3 on the Adult Contemporary chart. It is their last Top Ten hit on the Hot 100.

I Won't Hold You Back

"I Won't Hold You Back" is a song by American rock band Toto, written and sung by Steve Lukather for their fourth album, Toto IV, released in 1983 (see 1983 in music). The power ballad peaked at number 10 in the US on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on May 7, 1983 and spent three weeks at number one on the Adult Contemporary chart. The single only managed to scrape into the top 40 on the UK Singles Chart. It also peaked at number 11 in Ireland.

The song features the Eagles' bass player Timothy B. Schmit on backing vocals during the choruses.

The song was featured on an episode of American Dad.

The song was later sampled by house DJ Roger Sanchez in 2001 for his song "Another Chance", reaching number one in the UK Singles Chart.

Indian Summer (Poco album)

Indian Summer is the tenth studio album by the American country rock band Poco, released on May 1, 1977. This was the band's last studio album before both Timothy B. Schmit and George Grantham left the group.

Love Will Keep Us Alive

"Love Will Keep Us Alive" is a song written by Jim Capaldi, Paul Carrack, and Peter Vale, and produced by the Eagles, Elliot Scheiner, and Rob Jacobs. It was first performed by the Eagles in 1994, during their "Hell Freezes Over" reunion tour, with lead vocals by bassist Timothy B. Schmit. This is the last single to feature Don Felder, who was terminated from the band in 2001.

Although the song was never formally released as a single in the US, and thus was not eligible to appear on the US Billboard Hot 100 under the rules then in place, it spent three weeks at number one on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart in early 1995 and reached number 22 on Billboard's Hot 100 Airplay chart. In the United Kingdom, "Love Will Keep Us Alive" was issued as a single and peaked at number 52 on the UK Singles Chart.Aside from being on the album Hell Freezes Over, the song appears on the Eagles' box set, Selected Works 1972-1999 and the 2003 compilation album, The Very Best Of.

Paul Carrack recorded the song for his 1996 album, Blue Views; it also featured on his 2006 compilation album, Greatest Hits - The Story So Far.

In 2011, Paul Carrack and Timothy B. Schmit recorded the song in London with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, and released it in the UK on the Carrack label.

Playin' It Cool

Playin' It Cool is the debut studio solo album by Timothy B. Schmit, the bass guitarist and co-lead vocalist for the Eagles. The album was released in 1984 on Asylum in the United States and Europe. The album features guest appearances from Don Henley, Joe Walsh, Steve Lukather, Carl Wilson, J.D. Souther and Rita Coolidge.

Poco

Poco is an American country rock band originally formed by Richie Furay, Jim Messina and Rusty Young. Formed following the demise of Buffalo Springfield in 1968, Poco was part of the first wave of the West Coast country rock genre. The title of their first album, Pickin' Up the Pieces, is a reference to the break-up of Buffalo Springfield. Throughout the years Poco has performed in various groupings, and is still active.

Poco (album)

Poco is the second album by American country rock band Poco. This is the band's first album to feature Timothy B. Schmit who replaced Randy Meisner. The Messina-penned "You Better Think Twice" became a signature song for the band. A copy of this album hangs in the Poco exhibit in the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville along with the jacket Rusty Young wears on the back cover.

Rose of Cimarron (album)

Rose of Cimarron is the ninth studio album by the American country rock band Poco, released May 1976. Former Loggins & Messina sax/fiddle player Al Garth joined the band to record this album, but left shortly after due to internal conflicts. The title track became one of the band's signature songs, and was later recorded by Emmylou Harris on her album, Cimarron. The band's old label, Epic Records, released Poco Live just one month before Rose of Cimarron, causing confusion among listeners and helping sales of the former at the expense of the latter.

Rose of Cimarron (song)

"Rose of Cimarron" is a song by country rock band Poco being the title cut of their 1976 album release Rose of Cimarron: written by founding member Rusty Young, the song featured lead vocals by Paul Cotton and Timothy B. Schmit.

Tell Me What You Dream

"Tell Me What You Dream" is a song written by Timothy B. Schmit, Josh Leo and Vince Melamed and performed by country group Restless Heart along with saxophonist Warren Hill. The single was the group's only number one on the adult contemporary chart, spending two weeks on top, and despite previous country chart success, the song did not make the country top 40. "Tell Me What You Dream" narrowly missed the Top 40 on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number forty-three.

The Anthology... So Far

The Anthology... So Far is a triple live compilation album by Ringo Starr released on 5 February 2001 by Eagle in the UK, while the US release occurred on 24 July by Koch. Rounding up the bulk of the material on 1990s Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band, 1993's Ringo Starr and His All Starr Band Volume 2: Live From Montreux and 1997's Ringo Starr and His Third All-Starr Band-Volume 1 – in addition to previously unheard material recorded live in 1995, 1997 and 2000, The Anthology... So Far stands as an exhaustive collection of Starr's concert highlights spanning a decade.

Over the course of the collection Starr is joined by Randy Bachman, Gary Brooker, Jack Bruce, Tim Cappello, Eric Carmen, Felix Cavaliere, Clarence Clemons, Burton Cummings, Rick Danko, Dr. John, Dave Edmunds, John Entwistle, Mark Farner, Peter Frampton, Levon Helm, Jim Keltner, Simon Kirke, Nils Lofgren, Billy Preston, Mark Rivera, Todd Rundgren, Timothy B. Schmit, Zak Starkey and Joe Walsh.

Despite receiving some favourable reviews, The Anthology... So Far failed to chart upon its release.

The Last Roundup (album)

The Last Roundup is the 21st album, and 3rd live album, by the country rock band Poco.

Recorded live in July 1977 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium during the Indian Summer tour, it was intended to be the band's 13th album. However, its release was cancelled by ABC Records after Timothy B. Schmit left the band to join The Eagles. Poco had intended this album to counteract the damage done to the band's career by the release of Poco Live by their former label, and Richie Furay made a special guest appearance on the album in an effort to boost the album's appeal. It contains mainly music from the post-Furay era. This was Furay's first appearance with the group since his departure after Crazy Eyes.

There Goes the Neighborhood (album)

There Goes the Neighborhood is the fifth solo studio album by the American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Joe Walsh, guitarist for the Eagles. The album was released in early 1981, on the record label Asylum, three years after Walsh's album But Seriously, Folks.... A commercial and critical success, it is generally regarded as the culmination of the smoother, more adult-oriented sound of Walsh's solo work.

The album features contributions from two Eagles' members Don Felder and Timothy B. Schmit as well as session musicians including Russ Kunkel, David Lindley, Bob Mayo, and Victor Feldman.

The album peaked at number 20 on the Billboard 200. The album only spawned one single, "A Life of Illusion", which would become one of Walsh's most popular songs. The single also topped the Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.

Timothy B.

Timothy B is the second studio solo album by Timothy B. Schmit, the bass guitarist and co-lead vocalist for the Eagles. The album was released in 1987 on MCA in the United States and Europe, three years after Schmit's debut solo album, Playin' It Cool and seven years after the demise of the Eagles. The album peaked at #106 on the Billboard 200 chart, and the single, "Boys Night Out", peaked at #25 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, this song is Schmit's best selling single. The album was produced by Richard Rudolph, and it was co-produced by Bruce Gaitsch.

Wasted on the Way

"Wasted on the Way" is a 1982 song by American folk rock band Crosby, Stills & Nash, featuring harmony vocals by Timothy B. Schmit. It was their first top 10 hit in five years, and peaked at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles charts in August 1982. On the Adult Contemporary chart, "Wasted on the Way" was the group's biggest hit on the chart, peaking at number two for five weeks. It appeared on the band's 1982 album Daylight Again. The B-side was the David Crosby composition "Delta".

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