Timeline of science fiction

This is a timeline of science fiction as a literary tradition.

2nd century

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
  • A True Story was written by Lucian of Samosata, contains a number of SF elements, like travel in space, alien life forms, interplanetary colonization and war, artificial atmosphere, telescopes, and artificial life forms.

10th century

Year Event Literary History Historical Events

13th century

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
c. 1270

16th century

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
1516

17th century

New Atlantis
Bacon 1628 New Atlantis title page wpreview
Title page of the 1628 edition of Bacon's New Atlantis
AuthorFrancis Bacon
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageLatin/English
GenreUtopian novel
Publication date
1624/1626
Media typePrint (hardback)
Pages46 pp
Kirchermagneticclock
Kircher's magnetic clock.
Year Event Literary History Historical Events
1619
1623
1627
1634
1638
1656
1666
1686

18th century

Year Event Literary history Historical events
1733
1741
1752
1765
1771
1780
  • The Passage from the North to the South Pole is published anonymously in France.[6]

19th century

The Island of Doctor Moreau
IslandOfDrMoreau
First edition cover
AuthorH. G. Wells
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction
PublisherHeinemann, Stone & Kimball
Publication date
1896
Media typePrint (hardcover)
Pages209 p.
Preceded byThe Wonderful Visit 
Followed byThe Wheels of Chance 
The Steam Man of the Prairies
The steam man of the prairies (1868) big
Beadle's American Novel No. 45, August 1868, featuring "The Steam Man of the Prairies"
AuthorEdward S. Ellis
SeriesFrank Reade
GenreScience fiction
Published1868
Year Event Literary history Historical events
1805
1814
1816
1818
1826
1827
1835
1839
1844
1848
1851
1859
  • Hermann Lang publishes The Air Battle: a Vision of the Future.[11]
1863
1864
1865
1868
1870
1871
1872
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1893
1895
1896
1897
1898

1900s

Year Event Literary history Historical events
1900
1901
1903
1905
1907
1909

1910s

Ralph 124C 41+
ModernElectrics1912-02
Serialized in Modern Electrics
AuthorHugo Gernsback
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction novel
Publication date
1911
Media typePrint (hardback & paperback)
Preceded bynone 
Followed bynone 
Year Event Literary history Historical events
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

1920s

The Master Mind of Mars
Amazing Stories Annual 1927
Cover of the pulp magazine Amazing Stories, featuring Master Mind of Mars
AuthorEdgar Rice Burroughs
Cover artistFrank R. Paul
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SubjectBarsoom
GenreScience fiction
Preceded byThe Chessmen of Mars 
Followed byA Fighting Man of Mars 
Year Event Literary history Historical events
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930s

Year Event Literary history Historical events
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940s

Year Event Literary history Historical events
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
  • ENIAC, the world's first electronic computer, is built.[26]
1947
1948
1949

1950s

Year Event Literary history Historical events
1950
1951
  • The Festival of Britain exhibition celebrates innovative British architecture, scientific discoveries, technology, and industrial design.[27]
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
  • Terra, a new series of science fiction publications, is launched in Germany.[28]
  • Galaxis is founded in Germany.[28]
1958
1959

1960s

Year Event Literary history Historical events
1960
1961
1962
  • Telstar broadcasts the first live transatlantic pictures.[30]
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

1970s

Year Event Literary history Historical events
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979

1980s

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

1990s

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999

2000s

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009

2010s

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
  • Star Wars: The Force Awakens is released.[51]
2016
2017
2018
2019

2020s

Year Event Literary History Historical Events
2020
2021

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Richardson, Matthew (2001). The Halstead Treasury of Ancient Science Fiction. Rushcutters Bay, New South Wales: Halstead Press. ISBN 1-875684-64-6. (cf. "Once Upon a Time". Emerald City (85). September 2002. Retrieved 2008-09-17.)
  2. ^ Dr. Abu Shadi Al-Roubi (1982), "Ibn al-Nafis as a philosopher", Symposium on Ibn al-Nafis, Second International Conference on Islamic Medicine: Islamic Medical Organization, Kuwait (cf. Ibnul-Nafees As a Philosopher, Encyclopedia of Islamic World [1])
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xx. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  4. ^ a b Stableford, Brian (2003). "Science fiction before the genre". In Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  5. ^ a b Stableford, Brian (2003). "Science fiction before the genre". In Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 16. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  6. ^ a b c Stableford, Brian (2003). "Science fiction before the genre". In Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  7. ^ a b c d e Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 36. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  8. ^ a b Willis, Martin (2006). Mesmerists, Monsters, and Machines: Science Fiction and the Cultures of Science in the Nineteenth Century. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press. pp. 29–30.
  9. ^ a b Stableford, Brian (2003). "Science fiction before the genre". In Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 18. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 37. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  11. ^ a b c d Stableford, Brian (2003). "Science fiction before the genre". In Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 20. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  12. ^ a b c Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 42. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxi. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  14. ^ a b c d e Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 43. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  15. ^ Roberts, Adam (2006). The History of Science Fiction. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. p. 157. ISBN 978-0-333-97022-5.
  16. ^ https://archive.org/details/immortalsgreatqu00barl
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 46. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 47. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 50. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 51. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 56. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 57. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  23. ^ Roberts, Adam (2006). The History of Science Fiction. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. p. 165. ISBN 978-0-333-97022-5.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 64. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxii. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 65. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 68. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 69. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxiii. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 73. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxiv. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  33. ^ Stewart, William. "ARPANET -- The First Internet". livinginternet.com. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 78. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxv. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 79. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  37. ^ Debnath, Neela (11 December 2011). "8 'The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction' makes internet debut". The Independent. Archived from the original on 6 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Clute, John. Science Fiction: the Illustrated hi=Dorling Kindersley. London. p. 86. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  39. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 87. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxvi. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 92. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  42. ^ Berners-Lee, Tim. "Pre-W3C Web and Internet Background". World Wide Web Consortium. Retrieved 21 April 2009.
  43. ^ a b c d e f Clute, John (1995). Science Fiction: the Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 93. ISBN 0-7894-0185-1.
  44. ^ StarTrek.com http://www.startrek.com/database_article/emissary-part-i. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah James, Edward; Mendlesohn, Farah (2003). Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxvii. ISBN 978-0-521-01657-5.
  46. ^ StarTrek.com http://www.startrek.com/database_article/caretaker-part-i. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  47. ^ Anders, Charlie Jane (20 November 2012). "21 Pictures that Sum Up the Whole History of Science Fiction". Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  48. ^ "Brave New Words". Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  49. ^ StarTrek.com http://www.startrek.com/database_article/star-trek-2009. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  50. ^ BBC America http://www.bbcamerica.com/shows/orphan-black/season-1. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  51. ^ StarWars.com http://www.starwars.com/films/star-wars-episode-vii-the-force-awakens. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  52. ^ StarTrek.com http://www.startrek.com/database_article/the-vulcan-hello. Missing or empty |title= (help)
Galaxis

Galaxis is a 1995 action science fiction film directed by William Mesa and written by Nick Davis. It stars Brigitte Nielsen, Richard Moll, and Craig Fairbrass.

The film received a negative review from the Houston Chronicle, which wrote it may actually be worse than direct-to-video productions.

History of science fiction

The literary genre of science fiction is diverse, and its exact definition remains a contested question among both scholars and devotees. This lack of consensus is reflected in debates about the genre's history, particularly over determining its exact origins. There are two broad camps of thought, one that identifies the genre's roots in early fantastical works such as the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh (earliest Sumerian text versions c. 2150–2000 BCE). A second approach argues that science fiction only became possible sometime between the 17th and early 19th centuries, following the scientific revolution and major discoveries in astronomy, physics, and mathematics.

Question of deeper origins aside, science fiction developed and boomed in the 20th century, as the deep integration of science and inventions into daily life encouraged a greater interest in literature that explores the relationship between technology, society, and the individual. Scholar Robert Scholes calls the history of science fiction "the history of humanity's changing attitudes toward space and time ... the history of our growing understanding of the universe and the position of our species in that universe." In recent decades, the genre has diversified and become firmly established as a major influence on global culture and thought.

Outline of science fiction

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to science fiction:

Science fiction – a genre of fiction dealing with the impact of imagined innovations in science or technology, often in a futuristic setting. or depicting space exploration. Exploring the consequences of such innovations is the traditional purpose of science fiction, making it a "literature of ideas".

Science fiction

Science fiction (often shortened to Sci-Fi or SF) is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, space exploration, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas".

Star Trek

Star Trek is an American space opera media franchise based on the science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry. The first television series, simply called Star Trek and now referred to as "The Original Series", debuted in 1966 and aired for three seasons on the television network NBC. It followed the interstellar adventures of Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and his crew aboard the starship USS Enterprise, a space exploration vessel, built by the United Federation of Planets in the twenty-third century. The Star Trek canon of the franchise includes The Original Series, an animated series, five spin-off television series, the film franchise, and further adaptations in several media.

In creating Star Trek, Roddenberry was inspired by the Horatio Hornblower novels, the satirical book Gulliver's Travels, and westerns such as the television series Wagon Train. These adventures continued in the 22-episode Star Trek: The Animated Series and six feature films. Four spin-off television series were eventually produced: Star Trek: The Next Generation followed the crew of a new starship Enterprise set a century after the original series; Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager set contemporaneously with The Next Generation; and Star Trek: Enterprise set before the original series in the early days of human interstellar travel. The most recent Star Trek TV series, entitled Star Trek: Discovery, premiered on CBS and was later made available exclusively on the digital platform CBS All Access. The adventures of The Next Generation crew continued in four additional feature films. In 2009, the film franchise underwent a "reboot" set in an alternate timeline, or "Kelvin Timeline," entitled simply Star Trek. This film featured a new cast portraying younger versions of the crew from the original show; their adventures were continued in the sequel film, Star Trek Into Darkness (2013). The thirteenth film feature and sequel, Star Trek Beyond (2016), was released to coincide with the franchise's 50th anniversary.

Star Trek has been a cult phenomenon for decades. Fans of the franchise are called Trekkies or Trekkers. The franchise spans a wide range of spin-offs including games, figurines, novels, toys, and comics. Star Trek had a themed attraction in Las Vegas that opened in 1998 and closed in September 2008. At least two museum exhibits of props travel the world. The series has its own full-fledged constructed language, Klingon. Several parodies have been made of Star Trek. In addition, viewers have produced several fan productions. As of July 2016, the franchise had generated $10 billion in revenue, making Star Trek one of the highest-grossing media franchises of all time.

Star Trek is noted for its cultural influence beyond works of science fiction. The franchise is also noted for its progressive civil rights stances. The Original Series included one of television's first multiracial casts. Star Trek references may be found throughout popular culture from movies such as the submarine thriller Crimson Tide to the animated series South Park.

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