Tim Salmon

Timothy James Salmon (born August 24, 1968), nicknamed King Fish, is a retired Major League Baseball outfielder and designated hitter who played his entire career with the team known, at various points during his tenure, as the California Angels, Anaheim Angels and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. He appeared with the Angels franchise under all three of its recent names.

Tim Salmon
Tim Salmon Afghanistan crop
Right fielder
Born: August 24, 1968 (age 50)
Long Beach, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 21, 1992, for the California Angels
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 2006, for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
MLB statistics
Batting average.282
Home runs299
Runs batted in1,016
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Career prime

Salmon who had been selected in the third round of the Major League Baseball Draft in 1989 out of Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, made his major league debut in 1992, the same year that he won the Baseball America Minor League Player of the Year Award.

In his first full season the next year, when he hit 31 home runs with a .918 OPS, Salmon was named the American League's Rookie of the Year for 1993 and quickly became a favorite of the Angels' organization and a household name among the team's fans. He maintained his status as one of the league's elite power-hitting outfielders throughout the decade. He finished seventh in MVP voting totals for the first time in 1995, when he won a Silver Slugger Award, finished third in the league with a .330 batting average, and posted an OPS above 1.000. That year, he was the first major league player to get a hit off closer for the New York Yankees, Mariano Rivera.[1] He finished seventh again in 1997 when he had a career high 129 RBIs. After playing in fewer than 100 games in 1999, he tied a career high 34 home runs in 2000. From 1993 to 2000 he only had two OPS lines below .900 and he never finished below .860.

Before the 2001 season, Salmon, who was about to finish a four-year contract signed before the 1997 season, briefly considered signing with the Arizona Diamondbacks, but instead signed a four-year, $40 million extension with the Angels.[2]

World Series and comebacks

Salmon's 2001 season was largely disappointing as he finished with career lows for full seasons in a number of categories. Nevertheless, he followed it up with what may have been his most meaningful season. After a resurgent regular season for which he was named the AL Comeback Player of the Year, Salmon was a crucial part of the Angels' playoff and World Series run in 2002, hitting two key home runs in Game 2 of the World Series against the San Francisco Giants and batting .346 with a 1.067 OPS in the series overall.

Following a solid 2003 season, Salmon appeared in only 60 games for the Angels in 2004. After being sidelined for the entire 2005 season to recover from left knee and right rotator cuff surgery, a return was doubtful. Deciding against ending his career on those terms, however, Salmon dedicated himself to becoming healthy enough to play one final season in 2006. On December 2, 2005, the Angels announced that they had agreed to terms on a minor league contract with Salmon, making him a non-roster invitee to the team's 2006 spring training. Though he preferred to return to the Angels, Salmon was aware that he was considered unlikely to make the team's roster, but he saw the opportunity to play with the team during the exhibition season as a chance to potentially audition for other teams.

However, Salmon turned in a surprisingly strong performance during spring training and secured a role for himself with the Angels. At the end of the exhibition, the team announced that Salmon had made their roster, meaning he would earn a $400,000 salary for the 2006 season. Salmon spent the season as a designated hitter and reserve outfielder. He indicated that making it through the season successfully would mean that he accomplished his goal of being able to end his career on his own terms. In any respect, Salmon's 2006 season was a significant improvement over his meager 2004 campaign. He finished the season with an .811 OPS over 76 games, having passed 1000 career RBIs and boosted his career home run total to 299.

Despite setting the Angels' franchise record for home runs and finishing his career with over 1,000 RBIs, Salmon was never selected as an All-Star during his 14-year career.[3] Salmon's career home run total is the highest for any player since the first All-Star Game in 1933 to have never been selected to appear in the game.[3]

Retirement

On September 28, 2006, Salmon announced he would retire at the end of the 2006 season.[4] He played his final Major League game on October 1, 2006, against the Oakland Athletics. His name and jersey number were cut into the infield and outfield grass of the playing field at Angel Stadium.

He returned to Angel Stadium as a player in the 2010 All-Star Legends and Celebrity Softball Game where he received a standing ovation before hitting two home runs for the American League[5] and receiving the game's MVP award.[6]

Salmon's number (15) with the Angels has not been retired yet, but it has not been used by an Angel since his retirement. When Dan Haren was traded to the Angels from the Arizona Diamondbacks on July 25, 2010, he requested number 24 instead of his usual 15 out of respect for Salmon.

Since 2014, Salmon has been a pre-game and post-game analyst for Angels games on Fox Sports West.

Career accomplishments

As of 2019, Salmon is the Angels' all-time leader in home runs (299) and walks (965). He is second in franchise history with 1016 RBIs and 986 runs scored, behind Garret Anderson. He is one of only three Angels players to have won the Rookie of the Year award, the others being Mike Trout in 2012[7] and Shohei Ohtani in 2018.

See also

References

  1. ^ Since 1996, Yankee's Rivera Has Made It Look As Easy As 1-2-3 NY Times
  2. ^ "The 100 Greatest Angels: # 1 Tim Salmon". halosheaven.com.
  3. ^ a b DiGiovanna, Mike (2010-07-05). "Dodgers' Eric Karros and Angels' Tim Salmon were stars . . . just not All-Stars". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  4. ^ Scarr, Mike (September 28, 2006). "Salmon officially announces retirement". losangeles.angels.mlb.com. Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Retrieved February 11, 2014.
  5. ^ "The Fabulous Forum". Los Angeles Times. July 11, 2010.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20121112&content_id=40254318&vkey=news_mlb&c_id=mlb

External links

Preceded by
Jeff King
American League Player of the Month
July, 1997
Succeeded by
Bernie Williams
1983–84 OHL season

The 1983–84 OHL season was the fourth season of the Ontario Hockey League. The Leo Lalonde Memorial Trophy is inaugurated for the overage player of the year. Fifteen teams each played 70 games. The Ottawa 67's won the J. Ross Robertson Cup, defeating the Kitchener Rangers.

1986 Major League Baseball draft

The 1986 Major League Baseball Draft was the 22nd MLB draft that took place in 1986. During this draft 21 future all-stars were drafted including, Greg Swindell, Matt Williams, Kevin Brown, Gary Sheffield, Roberto Hernández, Jack Armstrong, Dean Palmer, Scott Cooper, Kent Bottenfield, Bo Jackson, Joe Girardi, Pat Hentgen, Tom Gordon, Steve Finley, Rod Beck, Chuck Knoblauch, Rick Reed, Paul Quantrill, John Olerud, Scott Erickson and Todd Jones.

1995 California Angels season

The California Angels' 1995 season featured the Angels finishing in second place in the American League West with a record of 78 wins and 67 losses.

The 1995 Angels went through statistically the worst late-season collapse in Major League Baseball history. On August 16, they held a 10½-game lead over the Texas Rangers and an 11½-game lead over the Seattle Mariners, but suffered through a late season slump, including a nine-game losing streak from August 25 to September 3. They were still atop the division, leading Seattle by six games and Texas by 7½, when a second nine-game losing streak from September 13 to 23 dropped them out of first place. The Angels rebounded to win the last five scheduled games to tie Seattle for the division lead, forcing a one-game playoff to determine the division champion. Mariners ace Randy Johnson led his team to a 9–1 triumph over Angel hurler Mark Langston in the tiebreaker game, ending the Angels' season. It was the closest the Angels would come to reaching the postseason between 1986 and 2002.

1997 Anaheim Angels season

The Anaheim Angels 1997 season involved the Angels finishing 2nd in the American League West with a record of 84 wins and 78 losses. It was the first season for the franchise as the "Anaheim Angels", after playing under the name of the "California Angels" for the previous 31 seasons, plus part of another.

1998 Anaheim Angels season

The Anaheim Angels 1998 season involved the Angels finishing 2nd in the American League west with a record of 85 wins and 77 losses.

2000 Anaheim Angels season

The Anaheim Angels 2000 season involved the Angels finishing 3rd in the American League West with a record of 82 wins and 80 losses.

The Angels had an extremely powerful offense, with five players (Garret Anderson, Darin Erstad, Troy Glaus, Tim Salmon, and Mo Vaughn) hitting at least 25 homers and driving in 97 runs. Glaus led the AL in HRs, and Erstad had the most hits on his way to a .355 batting average. However, the pitching was very inconsistent. No one pitched over 170 innings. Reliever Shigetoshi Hasegawa led the team with a 3.57 ERA and was also the only one to win 10 games.

2002 American League Division Series

The 2002 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2002 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Sunday, October 6, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) New York Yankees (Eastern Division champion, 103–58) vs. (4) Anaheim Angels (Wild Card, 99–63): Angels win series, 3–1.

(2) Oakland Athletics (Western Division champion, 103–59) vs. (3) Minnesota Twins (Central Division champion, 94–67): Twins win series, 3–2.The Division Series saw the wild card-qualifying Angels beat the defending league champion Yankees, and the Twins defeat the Athletics in a startling upset. The Angels and Twins went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Angels became the American League champion, and defeated the National League champion San Francisco Giants in the 2002 World Series.

2002 Anaheim Angels season

The Anaheim Angels' 2002 season was the franchise's 42nd, and it ended with the team's first American League pennant and World Series championship.

The Angels finished the regular season with a record of 99-63, 4 games behind the Oakland Athletics in the American League West standings, but qualified for the franchise's first ever wild card playoff berth to return to the postseason for the first time since 1986. Outfielder Garret Anderson led the team with 123 runs batted in and a .539 slugging percentage, was selected for the AL All-Star team, and won the Silver Slugger Award. Jarrod Washburn went 18-6 with a 3.15 earned run average to anchor a pitching staff that allowed the fewest runs in the league.

In the postseason, the Angels defeated the New York Yankees 3-1 in the American League Division Series, then defeated the Minnesota Twins 4-1 in the American League Championship Series to win the AL pennant. The Angels then won the World Series in dramatic fashion when, with a 3-2 series deficit to the San Francisco Giants, they overcame a 5 run deficit in the late innings of Game 6 to force a winner-take-all Game 7, which they won to clinch the series 4-3. The morning after the win, The Orange County Register celebrated the Angels' win with the headline "7th Heaven," referring to the popular television series and fact that it took seven games for the Angels to win the World Series, and in doing so, it sent them to seventh heaven.2002 was also notable as the season in which the Angels debuted their present-day uniforms, colors, and halo insignia, which replaced the widely ridiculed "periwinkle" uniforms and "winged" insignia they had worn since 1997. It was also the last season the team was owned by The Walt Disney Company, which sold its controlling interest in the team to present-day owner Arte Moreno in 2003.

2002 World Series

The 2002 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s 2002 season. The 98th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Anaheim Angels and the National League (NL) champion San Francisco Giants; the Angels defeated the Giants, four games to three, to win their first, and, to date, only World Series championship. The series was played from October 19–27, 2002, at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco and Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim.

This was the first World Series since the 1995 inception of the wild card in MLB (and the last until 2014) in which both wild card teams would vie for the title. The Angels finished the regular season in second place in the AL West division. They defeated the four-time defending AL champion New York Yankees, three games to one, in the best-of-five AL Division Series, and in doing so won their first postseason series in franchise history. They then defeated the Minnesota Twins, four games to one, in the best-of-seven AL Championship Series to advance to the World Series, another first in franchise history. The Giants finished the regular season in second place in the NL West division. They defeated the Atlanta Braves in the NL Division Series and the St. Louis Cardinals in the NL Championship Series to advance to the World Series, giving the team their 20th NL pennant and 17th appearance in the Fall Classic but only their third since moving from New York City to San Francisco in 1958.

The series was the fourth World Series played between two teams from California, after 1974, 1988, and 1989. Barry Bonds, Reggie Sanders, and J. T. Snow each hit home runs to help propel the Giants to win Game one. Game two was a high-scoring affair that the Angels ultimately won on Tim Salmon's eighth-inning home run. The Angels routed the Giants in Game three, but lost Game four on a tie-breaking eighth-inning single by the Giants' David Bell. The Giants brought the Angels to the brink of elimination by winning Game five in a blowout. The Giants were eight outs away from winning the Series in Game six, but late game home runs by Scott Spiezio and Darin Erstad, as well as a two-RBI double by Troy Glaus helped the Angels overcome a five-run, seventh-inning deficit to win. A three-run double by Garret Anderson was the difference in the Angels' Game seven win to clinch the series. Glaus was named the World Series Most Valuable Player. The two teams set a record for combined most home runs in a World Series (21), which stood until 2017.

2006 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 2006 season started with the team trying to win their 3rd consecutive AL West title. However, they came short, finishing in second place with a record of 89–73. But the biggest story of the year was longtime Angels mainstay Tim Salmon playing his final season. Towards the end of the season, not only were the fans excited with trying to get into the playoffs in the final month of the season, but they were excited about Salmon trying to hit his 300th home run. Eventually, he ended with 299, one short of the milestone.

2012 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2012 proceeded according to rules most recently revised in July 2010. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 9, 2012. The Golden Era Committee, the second of three new era committees established by the July 2010 rules change, replacing the Veterans Committee, convened early in December 2011 to select from a Golden Era ballot of retired players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport between 1947 and 1972, called the "Golden Era" by the Hall of Fame.The induction class consists of Ron Santo, elected by the Golden Era Committee, and Barry Larkin, elected by the BBWAA.The induction ceremonies were held on July 22, 2012 at the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. On July 21, the Hall presented two awards for media excellence—its own Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasters and the BBWAA's J. G. Taylor Spink Award for writers.

Eric Karros

Eric Peter Karros (born November 4, 1967) is an American former professional baseball first baseman. Karros played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1991 to 2004 for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago Cubs, and Oakland Athletics. He was the National League Rookie of the Year in 1992 and won a Silver Slugger Award in 1995.

Garret Anderson

Garret Joseph Anderson (born June 30, 1972) is an American former professional baseball left fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the California / Anaheim Angels / Los Angeles Angles of Anaheim, Atlanta Braves, and Los Angeles Dodgers between 1994 and 2010. He holds Angels franchise records for career games played (2,013), at bats (7,989), hits (2,368), runs scored (1,024), runs batted in (RBI) (1,292), total bases (3,743), extra base hits (796), singles (1,572), doubles (489), grand slams (8), RBI in a single game (10) and consecutive games with an RBI (12), as well as home runs by a left-handed hitter (272). A three-time All-Star, he helped lead the Angels to the 2002 World Series title, and was named Most Valuable Player of the 2003 All-Star Game.

Jeff King (baseball)

Jeffrey Wayne King (born December 26, 1964) is a former professional baseball player who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Kansas City Royals.

Los Angeles Angels award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Los Angeles Angels professional baseball team.

Palm Springs Angels

The Palm Springs Angels were a minor league baseball team of the Class A California League from 1986 to 1993 and an affiliate of the California Angels. They began in 1986 when the Redwood Pioneers relocated to Palm Springs and they relocated to Lake Elsinore, California after the 1993 season and became the Lake Elsinore Storm.

Protégé Sports

Protégé Sports, Inc. is a company that provides online sports training from professional athletes and coaches. The company is based in Scottsdale, Arizona, and boasts a number of current and former professional athletes and coaches amongst its "mentors", including Steve Nash, Boris Diaw, Bob Lanier, George Gervin, Eddie Johnson, Kevin Young, Tim Salmon, Craig Waibel, Peter Kostis and Gary McCord.

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