Tikhon Kiselyov

Tikhon Yakovlevich Kiselyov (Russian: Ти́хон Я́ковлевич Киселёв, Belarusian: Ціхан Якаўлевіч Кісялёў; 12 August (O.S.: 30 July), 1917 – 11 January 1983) was a Belarusian statesman in the Soviet Union, the leader (first secretary) of the Communist Party of Byelorussia, i.e., the de facto leader of the Byelorussian SSR (1980-1983).[1]

Tikhon Kiselyov
Ціхан Кісялёў
Tikhon Kiselyov
First Secretary of the Communist Party of Byelorussia
In office
15 October 1980 – 11 January 1983
Preceded byPyotr Masherov
Succeeded byNikolay Slyunkov
Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers
In office
5 December 1978 – 23 October 1980
PremierAlexei Kosygin
Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic
In office
9 April 1959 – 11 December 1978
Preceded byNikolay Avkhimovich
Succeeded byAleksandr Aksyonov
Candidate member of the 25th, 26th Politburo
In office
21 October 1980 – 11 January 1983
Full member of the 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th Central Committee
In office
31 October 1961 – 11 January 1983
Personal details
Born30 July 1917
Gomel Region, Russian Empire
Died11 January 1983 (aged 65)
Minsk, Byelorussian SSR, Soviet Union
NationalitySoviet
Political partyCommunist Party of the Soviet Union
Other political
affiliations
Communist Party of Byelorussia
ProfessionCivil servant

Career

Party

Government

Awards

References

  1. ^ Kiselyov's bio at hrono.info
  • Career data are taken from the Large Encyclopedic Dictionary (Moscow, 1991)
1983

1983 (MCMLXXXIII)

was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1983rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 983rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 83rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1980s decade.

The year 1983 saw both the official beginning of the Internet and the first mobile cellular telephone call.

25th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 25th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 25th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 25th Congress.

26th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 26th Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 26th Central Committee in the aftermath of the 26th Congress.

Central Committee elected by the 23rd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 23rd Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 23rd Congress, and was in session from 1966 until 1971. There were 195 regular members chosen, an increase from the 175 selected in 1961; of the 195 members, 51 were newcomers, and 144 were incumbents; another 31 had died or resigned since the 1961 election. Another 145 candidate members, who could participate but could not vote on motions, were picked in addition to the voting regular members.

The Committee elected, at its 1st Plenary Session, the 23rd Politburo, the 23rd Secretariat and the 23rd Party Control Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Central Committee elected by the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 24th Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 24th Congress, and was in session from 1971 until 1976. It elected, at its 1st Plenary Session, the 24th Politburo, the 24th Secretariat and the 24th Party Control Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Central Committee elected by the 25th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 25th Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 25th Congress, and was in session from 1976 until 1981. It elected, at its 1st Plenary Session, the 25th Politburo, the 25th Secretariat and the 25th Party Control Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Central Committee elected by the 26th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 26th Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was elected by the 26th Congress, and was in session from 1981 until 1986. It elected, at its 1st Plenary Session, the 26th Politburo, the 26th Secretariat and the 26th Party Control Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Communist Party of Byelorussia

The Communist Party of Byelorussia (Russian: Коммунистическая партия Белоруссии; Belarusian: Камуністычная партыя Беларусі), known as Communist Party (bolsheviks) of Byelorussia (Russian: Коммунистическая партия (большевиков) Белоруссии) until 1952, was a communist party in Belarus 1918–1991, created following the Russian Revolution of 1917. It was created as part of the Russian Communist Party (bolsheviks) December 30–31, 1918 with 17,800 members. It was important in creating the Belorussian Soviet Republic in January 1919. From February 1919 until 1920 it functioned as a single organisation together with the Communist Party of Lithuania, known as the Communist Party (bolsheviks) of Lithuania and Belorussia.

Deputy Premier of the Soviet Union

This is a list of all Deputy Premiers of the Soviet Union, meaning the government.

Kiselyov

Kiselyov/Kiseliov/Kiselev (Russian: Киселёв; masculine) or Kiselyova/ Kiseleva (Киселёва; feminine) is a Russian surname, derived from the word "kissel". It may refer to:

Afrikan Kiselyov (1910–1939), Soviet army officer and Hero of the Soviet Union

Aharon Moshe Kiselev (1866-1949), Manchurian rabbi

Alexey Kiselyov, several people

Alexander Kiselyov, several people

Andrey Kiselyov, several people

Dmitri Kiselev (1989–), Russian ice dancer

Dmitry Kiselyov (1954–), Russian journalist and official propagandist

Gennady Kiselyov (1922–1979), Soviet aircraft pilot and Hero of the Soviet Union

Ivan Alexandrovich Kiselyov (1920–?), Soviet army officer and Hero of the Soviet Union

Ivan Mikhaylovich Kiselyov (1919–1987), Soviet aircraft pilot and Hero of the Soviet Union

Larisa Kiselyova (born 1970), Russian handball player

Mariya Kiselyova (born 1974), Russian swimmer

Nikolay Kiselyov, several people:

Nikolay Kiselyov (soldier) (1913–1974), Soviet soldier, prisoner of war and partisan commander, Righteous Among the Nations

Nikolay Davydovich Kiselyov (1921–1980), Soviet army officer and Hero of the Soviet Union

Nikolay Kiselyov (athlete) (1939–2005), Soviet Nordic combined skier, silver medalist at the 1964 Winter Olympics

Nikolay Kiselyov (footballer) (born 1946), Soviet international footballer and manager

Nikolay Kiselyov (politician) (born 1950), Russian politician, former Governor of Arkhangelsk Oblast

Nikolai Dmitrievich Kiselev (1802-1869), Russian diplomat and Privy Councilor

Pavel Kiselyov (1788–1872), Russian general and politician

Kiselyov schools, name of rural parish schools in 1842–1867 in Russia; created on initiative of Pavel Kiselyov

Kiselyov reform, a reform of management of state-owned peasants in 1837–1841 in Russia, initiated by Pavel Kiselyov

Șoseaua Kiseleff, a major road in Bucharest, Romania, named after him

Semyon Kiselyov (1906–1985), Soviet commissar and Hero of the Soviet Union

Sergey Kiselyov, several people:

Sergey Kiselyov (historian) (1905–1962), Soviet historian and archeologist

Sergey Semyonovich Kiselyov (1910–1943), Soviet army officer and Hero of the Soviet Union

Sergey Kiselyov (footballer, born 1976), Russian professional footballer

Sergey Kiselyov (footballer, born 1990), Russian professional footballer

Tikhon Kiselyov (1917–?), Soviet statesman and party figure

Valery Kiselyov (born 1949), Soviet jazzman

Vasily Kiselyov (1910–1943), Soviet aircraft pilot and Hero of the Soviet Union

Vladimir Alexandrovich Kiselyov (1909–1988), Soviet army officer and Hero of the Soviet Union

Vladimir Kiselyov, Soviet shot put athlete

Yakov Mitrofanovich Kiselyov (1925–?), Soviet soldier and Hero of the Soviet Union

Yakov Semyonovich Kiselyov (1896–?), Soviet lawyer

Yevgeny Kiselyov (born 1956), Russian journalist

Kosygin's Fourth Government

The former government of Alexei Kosygin was dissolved following the Soviet legislative election of 1974. Kosygin was once again elected premier by the Politburo and the Central Committee following the election. His fourth government lasted for nearly five years, until the 1979 Soviet election.

List of national leaders of Belarus

This is a comprehensive chronological list of national leaders of Belarus since its first independence, in 1918, including its presidents both before and after the Soviet era, and the Soviet leaders themselves, who, unlike the Presidents, were not formal Heads of State.

List of rulers of Belarus

History of Belarusian states can be traced far to Principality of Polotsk. From 13th century lands of modern Belarus were a major part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania which later became part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 19th century Belarus together with Lithuania formed the Northwestern Krai of Russian Empire. At the beginning of the 20th century there was a short-lived Belarusian National Republic, and in 1922 Belarus became part of the USSR as Belarusian SSR except West Belarus, which was under Polish rule, which was briefly interrupted due to Soviet occupation during the Polish-Soviet War. In 1991, Belarus regained its independence.

Nikolay Slyunkov

Nikolay Nikitich Slyunkov (Russian: Николай Никитович Слюньков) (born 26 April 1929) is a former first secretary of the Communist Party of Byelorussian SSR during the Soviet Union.

Slyunkov became a full member of the Politburo on 26 June 1987, where he remained until 1990.

Pyotr Masherov

Pyotr Mironovich Masherov (Belarusian: Пётр Міро́навіч Машэ́раў; Russian: Пётр Миро́нович Маше́ров; 26 February [O.S. 13 February] 1918 – 4 October 1980 was the first secretary of Belarusian committee of the Communist Party of Soviet Union and a communist leader of Soviet Belarus.

Events (1964–1982)
Events (1982–1985)
Politburo members
Leaders
Governments
National economy
Brezhnev's family
Belarusian National Republic (1918–1919)
Byelorussian SSR (1919–1991)
Republic of Belarus (1991–present)

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