Thrilling Publications

Thrilling Publications, also known as Beacon Magazines (1936–37), Better Publications (1937–43) and Standard Magazines (1943–55), was a pulp magazine publisher run by Ned Pines, publishing such titles as Startling Stories and Thrilling Wonder Stories.

Pines became the president of Pines Publications in 1928. Pines folded most of his magazines in 1955 but continued to lead the company until 1961.

Thrilling Publications
IndustryMagazine publication
Founded1928
FounderNed Pines
Defunct1961
Headquarters
ProductsMagazines, pulp magazines
ServicesPublishing

Cover artists

Pines' cover artists included Earle K. Bergey, George Rozen, and Rudolph Belarski.

Paperbacks

In 1942 Pines started Popular Library, a paperback publishing house, and devoted himself to that company after closing his other ventures. Popular reprinted materials from the pulps.

Characters

Titles

  • Air War
  • Black Book Detective
  • Captain Future
  • Detective Book Magazine
  • Detective Novels
  • Exciting Love
  • Exciting Football
  • G-Men
  • The Lone Eagle
  • Masked Detective (1940–1943, 12 issues)
  • Mobsters
  • Popular Detective
  • Popular Love
  • Popular Sports Magazine
  • Rodeo Romances
  • Sky Fighters
  • Startling Stories
  • Strange Stories
  • Thrilling Adventures (1931–1943)
  • Thrilling Baseball
  • Thrilling Detective (1931–53, 213 issues)
  • Thrilling Football
  • Thrilling Love
  • Thrilling Mystery
  • Thrilling Ranch
  • Thrilling Sports
  • Thrilling Western
  • West
  • Thrilling Wonder Stories (1936–55, 112 issues)

See also

References

  • Wooley, John and Locke, John. "A History of the Thrilling Pulps." Thrilling Detective Heroes [Adventure House, 2007].

External links

Black Bat

The Black Bat was the name of two unrelated pulp heroes featured in different pulp magazine series in the 1930s, most well known because of their similarity to DC Comics hero, Batman.

Crimson Mask

Crimson Mask may refer to:

Crimson Mask (character), a fictional character from Thrilling Publications

Crimson mask, a professional wrestling term to describe a wrestler's face being covered in his own blood, most often due to blading

Crimson Mask (novel), a crime novel by W. H. Lane Crauford

Crimson Mask (film), a film by director Elias Plagianos

Earle K. Bergey

Earle Kulp Bergey (August 26, 1901 – September 30, 1952) was an American artist and illustrator who painted cover art for thousands of pulp fiction magazines and paperback books. One of the most prolific pulp fiction artists of the 20th century, Bergey is recognized for creating the iconic cover of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes for Popular Library at the height of his career in 1948.

Bergey was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to A. Frank and Ella Kulp Bergey. He attended Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts from 1921 to 1926, finishing formal Academy studies in the spring of 1926. He initially went to work in the art departments of Philadelphia newspapers including Public Ledger, and he drew the comic strip Deb Days in 1927. Early in his career, Bergey contributed many covers to the pulp magazines of publisher Fiction House. By the mid-1930s, Bergey made a home and studio in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and he married in 1935.

Experimenter Publishing

Experimenter Publishing was an American media company founded by Hugo Gernsback in 1915. The first magazine was The Electrical Experimenter (1913–1931) and the most notable magazines were Radio News (1919–1985) and Amazing Stories (1926–2005). Their radio station, WRNY, began broadcasting experimental television in 1928. In early 1929 the company was forced into bankruptcy and the Gernsback brothers lost control of Experimenter Publishing. The magazines did not miss an issue and were quickly sold to another publisher. The Gernsbacks promptly started new magazines to compete with their former ones.

Radio News became Popular Electronics and the January 1975 issue featured the Altair 8800 computer on the cover; this launched the personal computer revolution. Hugo Gernsback's Amazing Stories is regarded as the first dedicated science fiction magazine and every year World Science Fiction Society gives the Hugo Awards for the best science fiction and fantasy works.

Hugo Gernsback

Hugo Gernsback (; born Hugo Gernsbacher, August 16, 1884 – August 19, 1967) was a Luxembourgish-American inventor, writer, editor, and magazine publisher, best known for publications including the first science fiction magazine. His contributions to the genre as publisher–although not as a writer–were so significant that, along with the novelists H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, he is sometimes called "The Father of Science Fiction". In his honour, annual awards presented at the World Science Fiction Convention are named the "Hugos".

Lawrence Donovan

Lawrence Louis Donovan (July 1885–March 11, 1948) was an American pulp fiction writer who wrote nine Doc Savage novels under the pseudonym Kenneth Robeson, a pen name that was used by other writers of the same publishing house. However, there are nine Doc Savage novels duly credited to Donovan, published between November 1935 and July 1937.

Mort Weisinger

Mortimer "Mort" Weisinger (; April 25, 1915 – May 7, 1978) was an American magazine and comic book editor best known for editing DC Comics' Superman during the mid-1950s to 1960s, in the Silver Age of comic books. He also co-created such features as Aquaman, Green Arrow, Johnny Quick, and the original Vigilante, served as story editor for the Adventures of Superman television series, and compiled the often-revised paperback 1001 Valuable Things You Can Get Free.

Ned Pines

Ned L. Pines (December 10, 1905 – May 14, 1990) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, comic books, and paperback books, active from at least 1928 to 1971. His Standard Comics imprint was the parent company of the comic-book lines Nedor Publishing and Better Publications, the most prominent character of which was the superhero the Black Terror. Pines also established the paperback book publisher Popular Library, which eventually merged with Fawcett Publications.

Norman A. Daniels

Norman Arthur Danberg, better known as Norman A. Daniels and other pen names (1905 – 1995), was an American writer working in pulp magazines, radio, and television. He created the pulp hero the Black Bat and wrote for such series as The Phantom Detective and The Shadow.

Popular Library

Popular Library was a New York paperback book company established in 1942 by Leo Margulies and Ned Pines, who at the time were major pulp magazine and newspaper publishers. The company's logo of a pine tree was a tribute to Pines, and another Popular Library signature visual was a reduced black-and-white copy of the front cover on the title page.

A native of Malden, Massachusetts, Pines became the president of Pines Publications in 1928 and continued to lead the company until 1961. He was the president of Popular Library from 1942 to 1966 and its chairman from 1966 to 1968. Retiring in 1971, he continued to work as a consultant.

Rudolph Belarski

Rudolph Belarski (May 27, 1900-December 24, 1983) was an American graphic artist known for his cover art depicting aerial combat for magazines such as Wings, Dare Devil Aces, and War Birds. He also drew science fiction covers for Argosy in the 1930s and covers for mystery and detective novels.

Thrilling Adventures

Thrilling Adventures was a monthly American pulp magazine published from 1931 to 1943.

Tom Curry (writer)

Thomas Albert Curry (1900–1976) was an American pulp fiction writer who began writing crime and detective stories but went on to become one of the more prolific western writers in the genre.

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