Three-peat

In American sports, a three-peat is winning three consecutive championships. The term, a portmanteau of the words three and repeat, originated with the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association, during their unsuccessful campaign for a third consecutive championship during the 1988–89 season, having won the previous 2 NBA Finals in 1987 and 1988 against the Boston Celtics and Detroit Pistons, but were swept by the Pistons in the 1989 NBA Finals. The term is a registered trademark owned by Pat Riley (https://www.threepeat.com), the Lakers' head coach from 1981–1990, although it was coined by L.A. player Byron Scott immediately after their victorious championship defense against the Detroit Pistons in the 1988 NBA Finals.

Origin and trademark

In a comedic context, the same play on words, additionally incorporating the name "Pete", is known to have been used as early as 1930 on the radio program "Empire Builders!" The episode of that program broadcast on December 29, 1930, featured a trio of singers dubbed "The Three Visiting Firemen: Pete, Re-Pete, and Three-Pete".[1]

The Oxford English Dictionary credits an Illinois high school senior, Sharif Ford, with the earliest published use of the word in the March 8, 1989 edition of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Ford's quote uses the term in a sporting context and serves to provide a clear etymology as well:

The Lincoln High Tigers say they want to "three-peat". "You know, kind of like repeat, except doing it for the third time", senior Sharif Ford said.

However, Riles & Co., the corporate entity of National Basketball Association (NBA) coach Pat Riley, submitted in November 1988 a trademark application for the use of three-peat on shirts, jackets and hats. At the time, the phrase was being used by members and fans of the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team, of whom Riley was the head coach, regarding the Lakers' quest that season to obtain what would have been a third successive NBA championship. According to Riley, it was Laker player Byron Scott who coined the term in reference to the team's goal for that season.

In 1989, Riles & Co. successfully registered the trademark under U.S. Registration Number 1552980. The Lakers did not win a third consecutive NBA championship in 1989, but the Chicago Bulls did in 1993, and Riles & Co. collected royalties from sports apparel makers who licensed the phrase for use on merchandise commemorating that accomplishment.

Riles & Co. subsequently obtained additional registrations expanding the trademark to cover many other kinds of merchandise in addition to apparel. The company then went on to reap additional profits by again licensing the phrase to merchandisers when the Bulls again won three consecutive NBA championships from 1996 through 1998, as well as when the New York Yankees won three straight World Series championships from 1998 through 2000 and when the Lakers won three straight NBA championships from 2000 through 2002.

The trademark registration for three-peat has been challenged over the years by those who argue that the term has become too generic in its usage for the trademark to continue to be applicable. However, such arguments have yet to succeed, with the registration continuing to be upheld by the United States Patent and Trademark Office as recently as 2001, in the case of Christopher Wade v. Riles & Co.

In 2005, a group of individuals attempted to trademark the phrase Three-Pete in anticipation of the (ultimately unsuccessful) attempt that year by the University of Southern California (U.S.C.) football team to win a third consecutive national championship. The change in spelling was a reference to the team's head coach, Pete Carroll. However, the Patent Office ruled that the change in spelling was not dissimilar enough from Riles & Co.'s three-peat, and denied the registration. Later that year, U.S.C. fan Kyle Bunch began selling his own "Three-Pete" T-shirts. He discontinued sales once he was notified that he was infringing upon the Riles & Co. trademark.

As of late 2007, the trademark "Three Peat" is still active for shirts, jackets, caps, etc., and for commemorative mugs, plates, etc., and also for posters, bumper sticker, etc. The similar "3 Peat" became a registered trademark of Riles & Co. for blankets and other bedding, as of June 2015. Some of the Riles & Co. trademarks are no longer in effect, e.g. keychains.

Occurrences of three-peats

There have been numerous instances of teams winning three or more consecutive championships in the National Basketball Association, National Hockey League, Major League Baseball and Australian Football League most of which occurred prior to the advent of the term three-peat.

United States: professional sports

All-America Football Conference

Continental Basketball Association

Drum Corps International

Major Indoor Soccer League

Major League Baseball (World Series)

National Basketball Association (NBA Finals)

National Football League (pre-Super Bowl NFL champions)

National Hockey League (Stanley Cup Finals)

Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA Finals)

United States: collegiate sports

NACDA Director's Cup (overall collegiate athletics)

NAIA National Football Championship

NCAA Division I Baseball

  • 1970–1974 USC

NCAA Division I Football

Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS)[2]
Football Championship Subdivision (FCS)[3]

NCAA Division I Men's Basketball

NCAA Division I Men's Water Polo

  • 2008–2013 USC

NCAA Division I Women's Basketball

NCAA Division II Women's Basketball

NCAA Division III Women's Basketball

NCAA Division II Football Championship[4]

NCAA Division III Football[5]

U.S. National Collegiate Club Rugby championships

Chicago Catholic League championships

  • 2016–2017 Saint Benedict Lady Bengals
  • 2017–2018 Saint Benedict Lady Bengals
  • 2018–2019 Saint Benedict Lady Bengals

United States: Tabletop Games

Warhammer 40k American Team Championships[6]

  • Team Happy 2015-2017

Other countries

Argentina

First Division (association football)

Australia

Victorian Football League/Australian Football League

Australian Ice Hockey League

New South Wales Rugby Football League/Australian Rugby League/National Rugby League

West Australian Football League

Belgium

Belgian Pro League

Brazil

Brazilian Championship

Canada

Canadian Football League (Grey Cup):

Collegiate women's basketball

Chile

First Division (Association football):

Costa Rica

Costa Rica, American Football 1st Division:

Denmark

Danish Superliga

Finland

Veikkausliiga

France

Ligue 1

Germany

Basketball Bundesliga

Bundesliga

DDR-Oberliga

Italy

Italian Football Championship

Serie A

Netherlands

Eredivisie

Norway

Tippeligaen

Philippines

Philippine Basketball Association

Portugal

Primeira Liga

Spain

La Liga

Liga ACB

South Korea

K League

Sweden

Allsvenskan

Turkey

Turkey, American Football 1st Division:

Turkish Football League 1st Division 1971–73 Galatasaray 1979–81 Trabzonspor 1990–92 Beşiktaş 1997–2000 Galatasaray ( four-peat)

United Kingdom

English rugby league Super League Grand Final

English rugby union

English football first tier

USSR

Soviet Top League

Yugoslavia

Yugoslav First League

International

UEFA Champions League

UEFA Europa League

South American football Copa Libertadores

CONMEBOL's Copa América

Champ Car World Series auto racing

CONCACAF U.S. Open Cup

Indian cricket's Ranji Trophy

Cricket World Cup

  • 1999–2007 Australia Australia (World Cup every 4 years)

Formula One Champion

Winter X Games SuperPipe

Tennis

Davis Cup

  • 1903–06 United Kingdom British Isles
  • 1907–11  Australasia [7]
  • 1920–26 United States United States
  • 1927–32  France
  • 1933–36 United Kingdom Great Britain
  • 1946–49 United States United States
  • 1950–53 Australia Australia
  • 1955–57 Australia Australia
  • 1959–62 Australia Australia
  • 1964–67 Australia Australia
  • 1968–72  United States

Fed Cup

  • 1976–82  United States
  • 1983–85 Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
  • 1993–95 Spain

Australian Open

French Open

Wimbledon

US Open

ATP World Tour Finals

WTA Finals

Indian Wells Masters

Miami Open

Monte Carlo Masters

Italian Open

Paris Masters

Barcelona Open

Golf

US Open

The Open Championship

PGA Championship

The National Football League

In the National Football League (NFL), a Super Bowl championship three-peat has not been accomplished. Two-time defending Super Bowl champions who failed to three-peat include the Green Bay Packers (1968), Miami Dolphins (1974), Pittsburgh Steelers (twice: 1976, 1980), San Francisco 49ers (1990), Dallas Cowboys (1994), Denver Broncos (1999), and New England Patriots (2005). All of these teams failed to return to the title game in the third season (indicated in parentheses).

The Buffalo Bills went to 4 consecutive Super Bowls from 1990–1993 which is a feat unmatched in NFL history, however they lost in every appearance.

The New England Patriots are the most recent team to play in three consecutive Super Bowls from 2016-2018, winning Super Bowl LI (2016) and Super Bowl LIII (2018), but losing Super Bowl LII (2017)

In the early years of the NFL, decades before the introduction of either the term three-peat or the Super Bowl, the Packers won three consecutive NFL titles from 192931. This was achieved without playing any postseason playoff games, as the league title was determined at that time from the season standings. In addition, the Packers won the NFL championship in 1965, at a time when the rival NFL and AFL played separate exclusive championships. They then followed that 1965 championship with their first two Super Bowl victories in 1966 and 1967 (their Super Bowl berths were earned by winning both the 1966 NFL Championship Game and 1967 NFL Championship Game), thereby winning championships three years in a row.

Related terms

There have been efforts to come up with a similarly clever name for the potential fourth consecutive championship in the year following a three-peat. But attempts such as quat-row have thus far failed to catch on, and most fans simply use the term four-peat. Since the term three-peat came into usage, however, only one team in major American sports has been able to achieve it – Hendrick Racing/Jimmie Johnson NASCAR team, who won 5 championships in a row.

The wordplay of three-peat is clearer if repeat is stressed on the first syllable; this pronunciation is uncommon outside North America. Other English-speaking people may instead talk of a hat trick of championships, or simply a three-in-a-row.

There are also terms for winning three trophies in the same season:

References

  1. ^ Wizzard Media
  2. ^ "NCAA FBS Football Championship History". Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  3. ^ "NCAA FCS Football Championship History". Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  4. ^ "NCAA Division II Football Championship History". Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  5. ^ "NCAA Division III Football Championship History". Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  6. ^ "ATC Home". ATC American Team Championships. Retrieved 2018-01-03.
  7. ^ 1910 competition was walked over.
  8. ^ 4-peat if her pre-World War II 1940 title is included.
  9. ^ a b c The Australian Open was not held in 1941–45 due to World War II, indeed if the 1940 and 1946 tournaments are counted as straight versions Adrian Quist scores a ten-peat and John Bromwich an eight-peat.
  10. ^ The December 1977 title was shared with their final rivals.
  11. ^ The Australian Open was not held during 1986 due to date changes.
  12. ^ a b This is a rare example of a three-peat across the Amateur and Open Eras.
1914 Idaho football team

The 1914 Idaho football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1914 college football season. Idaho was led by tenth-year head coach John "Pink" Griffith and played as an independent; they joined the Pacific Coast Conference eight years later in 1922. The first three games were at home in Moscow, with the opener at the fairgrounds, and two on campus at the new MacLean Field.

In the season opener, Idaho defeated Gonzaga 5−3, then played a scoreless tie with Montana in the mud in the MacLean Field debut.After two consecutive wins in the series, Idaho lost to Washington State in the Battle of the Palouse, falling 0–3 at Rogers Field in Pullman. The weather was ideal but the only score was a drop-kick field goal in the second quarter. Nine years later, the Vandals won the first of three consecutive, their only three-peat in the rivalry series.

Idaho tallied a mere twelve points in its six games. In the opener, they scored on a field goal and a safety on a punt return, then went scoreless in the next four games. The sole Idaho touchdown came in the final game on a forward pass for the game's only score.It was Griffith's final year as head coach; he left for Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State) in Stillwater.

1916 Idaho football team

The 1916 Idaho football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1916 college football season. Idaho was led by first-year head coach Wilfred Bleamaster and played as an independent; they joined the Pacific Coast Conference six years later in 1922. Idaho had three home games in Moscow on campus at MacLean Field, with none in Boise.

Idaho dropped a third consecutive shutout to Washington State in the Battle of the Palouse, falling 0–31 at Rogers Field in Pullman. Seven years later, the Vandals won the first of three consecutive, their only three-peat in the rivalry series.

Idaho opened with five losses, then won three road games in six days for a 3–5 record.

1917 Idaho football team

The 1917 Idaho football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1917 college football season. Idaho was led by second-year head coach Wilfred Bleamaster and played as an independent; they joined the Pacific Coast Conference five years later in 1922. Idaho had two home games in Moscow on campus at MacLean Field, with none in Boise.

Idaho dropped a fourth consecutive shutout to Washington State in the Battle of the Palouse, falling 0–19 at home. Six years later, the Vandals won the first of three consecutive, their only three-peat in the rivalry series.

Idaho opened with three losses, then won twice for a 2–3 record. They did not play Gonzaga this season.

1919 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1919 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1919 college football season. Idaho was led by first-year head coach Ralph Hutchinson and played as an independent; they joined the Pacific Coast Conference in 1922. The Vandals had two home games in Moscow on campus at MacLean Field, with none in Boise.

Idaho dropped a fifth consecutive game to Washington State in the Battle of the Palouse, falling 0–37 at Rogers Field in Pullman. Four years later, the Vandals won the first of three consecutive, their only three-peat in the rivalry series.

Idaho opened with three losses, then won twice for a 2–3 record.

1920 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1920 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1920 college football season. Idaho was led by first-year head coach Thomas Kelley in their penultimate season as an independent before joining the Pacific Coast Conference in 1922. The Vandals had one home game in Moscow on campus at MacLean Field, with one in Boise at the state fairgrounds.

Idaho dropped a sixth consecutive game to Washington State in the Battle of the Palouse, falling 7–14 in the opener in Moscow. Three years later, the Vandals won the first of three consecutive, their only three-peat in the rivalry series.

After coming up six points short at Oregon to start with two losses, Idaho won its last four games.

1921 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1921 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1921 college football season. Idaho was led by second-year head coach Thomas Kelley in their last season as an independent before joining the Pacific Coast Conference. The Vandals had two home games in Moscow, one on campus at MacLean Field and another at the fairgrounds; they also played one in Boise at Public School Field.

Idaho dropped a seventh consecutive game to Washington State in the Battle of the Palouse, falling 3–20 at Rogers Field in Pullman. Two years later, the Vandals won the first of three consecutive, their only three-peat in the rivalry series.

The Boise game against Wyoming on the third anniversary of Armistice Day was attended by Governor D. W. Davis.

The following June, Kelley left for the University of Missouri. and was succeeded at Idaho in 1922 by Robert "Matty" Mathews.

1922 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1922 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1922 college football season. Idaho was led by first-year head coach Robert "Matty" Mathews in their first season as a member of the Pacific Coast Conference. One home game was played on campus in Moscow at MacLean Field, with one in Boise at Public School Field.

They dropped an eighth consecutive game to Washington State in the Battle of the Palouse, but it was the only loss to the Cougars under Mathews. Idaho won the next three meetings, their only three-peat in the rivalry series.

1942 Chicago Bears season

The 1942 Chicago Bears season was their 23rd regular season and 7th postseason completed in the National Football League. The club posted an 11–0 record under head coach George Halas (who left for World War II in November) and temporary co-coaches Hunk Anderson and Luke Johnsos. The Bears were denied a three-peat and the undefeated season when they lost to the Washington Redskins in the year's title game. In the previous two NFL championship games, the Bears defeated the Redskins, 73–0, and then the Giants, 37–9.

The 1942 Bears were "the single most dominant team in the history of the NFL," according to Cold Hard Football Facts. "The 1942 Bears went 11–0, scored 376 points and surrendered just 84 points. That dominant team, like the undefeated 2007 Patriots, was upset in the NFL championship game."

1947 Toronto Argonauts season

The 1947 Toronto Argonauts season was the 58th season for the team since the franchise's inception in 1873. The team finished in second place in the Interprovincial Rugby Football Union with a 7–4–1 record and qualified for the playoffs for the ninth consecutive season. The Argonauts defeated the Ottawa Rough Riders in a two-game total-points IRFU Final series before winning the Eastern Final over the Ottawa Trojans. The two-time defending Grey Cup champion Argonauts faced the Winnipeg Blue Bombers for the third time in a row in the Grey Cup game. Toronto won their eighth Grey Cup championship by a score of 10-9 for the first three-peat in franchise history.

1993 NBA Finals

The 1993 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1992–93 NBA season, featuring the Chicago Bulls, led by Michael Jordan, and the Phoenix Suns, winners of 62 games and led by regular season MVP Charles Barkley. The Bulls became the first team since the legendary Boston Celtics of the 1960s to win three consecutive championship titles, clinching the "three-peat" with John Paxson's game-winning 3-pointer that gave them a 99–98 victory in Game 6. Remarkably, the road team won every game except for Chicago's win at home in Game 4.

This series was aired on NBC with Marv Albert, Bob Costas (hosts), Mike Fratello, Magic Johnson, Quinn Buckner (analysts), Ahmad Rashād (Bulls sideline) and Hannah Storm (Suns sideline) (reporters) calling the action.

The 1993 NBA championship documentary, Three-Peat, marked the first time since 1982 that NBA Entertainment used film in on-court or off-court action, although most of it used videotape. It was narrated by Hal Douglas, who narrated the NBA Championship documentaries of 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997.

2018–19 Golden State Warriors season

The 2018–19 Golden State Warriors season is the 73rd season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and its 57th in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Warriors entered the season as the two-time defending NBA champions, having won back-to-back NBA championships. With the addition of free agent DeMarcus Cousins in the off-season, the Warriors have five All-Stars that were named to the 2018 All-Star Game. This is the sixth time in NBA history a team has had five All-Stars from the previous season, and the first since the Boston Celtics in 1976. This is the Warriors' final season at Oracle Arena in Oakland, before moving to the new Chase Center in San Francisco, beginning with the 2019–20 NBA season. Golden State made the playoffs for the seventh consecutive season, a new franchise record. The previous record was six, in the team's first six years of existence between 1947 and 1952.Klay Thompson broke the NBA record for three-pointers made in a game with 14, surpassing the 13 made by teammate Stephen Curry in the 2016–17 season. This season Curry moved into third on the all-time career three-point scoring list, with only Ray Allen and Reggie Miller having made more three-pointers in NBA history. Curry, Durant, and Thompson were all named to the All-Star Game. Durant was named MVP of the game, the fourth time a Warrior player has won the award and first since 1967. From November 15–21, the Warriors lost four games in a row this year for the first time since the 2012–13 season, and for the first time under the tenure of Steve Kerr.

The Warriors will attempt to become the first team since the 2000-2002 Los Angeles Lakers to three-peat in the NBA Finals, and would also be coach Steve Kerr's second three-peat, after doing so as a player with the Chicago Bulls from 1996 to 1998.

49ers–Giants rivalry

The 49ers–Giants rivalry is a National Football (NFL) rivalry between the San Francisco 49ers and the New York Giants. It is one of the great inter-division rivalry games in the NFL. The two teams do not play every year; instead, they play once every three years due to the NFL's rotating division schedules, or if the two teams finish in the same place in their respective divisions, they would play the ensuing season. Since 1982, the 49ers and Giants have met eight times in the postseason (including two NFC Championship Games), the most times two teams have met in the playoffs in the NFL since that time.

Both teams have won 16 regular season games and 4 postseason games against each other for a total of 20 wins each. However, San Francisco leads the overall series 18–11 since 1980.

Michael Jordan

Michael Jeffrey Jordan (born February 17, 1963), also known by his initials, MJ, is an American former professional basketball player. He played 15 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Chicago Bulls and Washington Wizards. His biography on the official NBA website states: "By acclamation, Michael Jordan is the greatest basketball player of all time." Jordan was one of the most effectively marketed athletes of his generation and was considered instrumental in popularizing the NBA around the world in the 1980s and 1990s. He is currently the principal owner and chairman of the NBA's Charlotte Hornets.

Jordan played three seasons for coach Dean Smith at the University of North Carolina. As a freshman, he was a member of the Tar Heels' national championship team in 1982. Jordan joined the Bulls in 1984 as the third overall draft pick. He quickly emerged as a league star and entertained crowds with his prolific scoring. His leaping ability, demonstrated by performing slam dunks from the free throw line in Slam Dunk Contests, earned him the nicknames Air Jordan and His Airness. He also gained a reputation for being one of the best defensive players in basketball. In 1991, he won his first NBA championship with the Bulls, and followed that achievement with titles in 1992 and 1993, securing a "three-peat". Although Jordan abruptly retired from basketball before the beginning of the 1993–94 NBA season, and started a new career in Minor League Baseball, he returned to the Bulls in March 1995 and led them to three additional championships in 1996, 1997, and 1998, as well as a then-record 72 regular-season wins in the 1995–96 NBA season. Jordan retired for a second time in January 1999, but returned for two more NBA seasons from 2001 to 2003 as a member of the Wizards.

Jordan's individual accolades and accomplishments include six NBA Finals Most Valuable Player (MVP) Awards, ten scoring titles (both all-time records), five MVP Awards, ten All-NBA First Team designations, nine All-Defensive First Team honors, fourteen NBA All-Star Game selections, three All-Star Game MVP Awards, three steals titles, and the 1988 NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award. He holds the NBA records for highest career regular season scoring average (30.12 points per game) and highest career playoff scoring average (33.45 points per game). In 1999, he was named the greatest North American athlete of the 20th century by ESPN, and was second to Babe Ruth on the Associated Press' list of athletes of the century. Jordan is a two-time inductee into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, having been enshrined in 2009 for his individual career, and again in 2010 as part of the group induction of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team ("The Dream Team"). He became a member of the FIBA Hall of Fame in 2015.

Jordan is also known for his product endorsements. He fueled the success of Nike's Air Jordan sneakers, which were introduced in 1984 and remain popular today. Jordan also starred as himself in the 1996 film Space Jam. In 2006, he became part-owner and head of basketball operations for the Charlotte Bobcats (now Hornets), and bought a controlling interest in 2010. In 2014, Jordan became the first billionaire player in NBA history. He is the third-richest African-American, behind Robert F. Smith and Oprah Winfrey.

Phillies–Pirates rivalry

The Phillies–Pirates rivalry is a Major League Baseball (MLB) rivalry between the Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates. Both clubs are members of MLB's National League (NL); the Phillies are members of the NL East division, while the Pirates are members of the NL Central division. The rivalry was considered by some to be one of the best in the NL. The rivalry started when the Pittsburgh Pirates entered NL play in their fifth season of 1887, four years after the Phillies.The Phillies and Pirates had remained together after the NL split into two divisions in 1969. During the period of two-division play (1969–1993), the two NL East division rivals won the two highest numbers of division championships, reigning almost exclusively as NL East champions in the 1970s and again in the early 1990s, the Pirates 9, the Phillies 6; together, the two teams' 15 championships accounted for more than half of the 25 NL East championships during that span.After the Pirates moved to the NL Central in 1994, the teams face each other only in two series each year and the rivalry has diminished. However, many fans, especially older ones, retain their dislike for the other team and regional differences between Eastern and Western Pennsylvania still fuel the rivalry. The rivalry is mirrored in the National Hockey League (NHL)'s so-called "Battle of Pennsylvania".

Riego Gamalinda

Riego Meinardo Villa Gamalinda (born May 25, 1986 in Iligan City) is a Filipino professional basketball player for the Magnolia Hotshots of the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA). He was drafted 11th overall in 2010 by the Bolts. He was one of the key players of the San Beda Red Lions during its three peat run from 2006 to 2008.

Robert Korzeniowski

Robert Marek Korzeniowski (born 30 July 1968) is a Polish former racewalker. He won four gold medals at the Summer Olympics and three at world championships. Korzeniowski is a three-peat winner of the 50 km walk at the Summer Olympics. He won 1996 in Atlanta, 2000 in Sydney, and 2004 in Athens. In addition, he became the first athlete to claim both the long distance and the short distance crown, when he won the 20 km title at the 2000 games.

Scottie Pippen

Scotty Maurice Pippen (born September 25, 1965), commonly spelled Scottie Pippen, is an American former professional basketball player. He played 17 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA), winning six NBA championships with the Chicago Bulls. Pippen, along with Michael Jordan, played an important role in transforming the Bulls into a championship team and for popularizing the NBA around the world during the 1990s.Considered one of the best small forwards of all time, Pippen was named to the NBA All-Defensive First Team eight consecutive times and the All-NBA First Team three times. He was a seven-time NBA All-Star and was the NBA All-Star Game MVP in 1994. He was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History during the 1996–97 season, and is one of four players to have his jersey retired by the Chicago Bulls (the others being Jerry Sloan, Bob Love, and Michael Jordan). He played a main role on both the 1992 Chicago Bulls Championship team and the 1996 Chicago Bulls Championship team which were selected as two of the Top 10 Teams in NBA History. His biography on the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame's website states, "The multidimensional Pippen ran the court like a point guard, attacked the boards like a power forward, and swished the nets like a shooting guard." During his 17-year career, he played 12 seasons with the Bulls, one with the Houston Rockets and four with the Portland Trail Blazers, making the postseason sixteen straight times.

Pippen is the only NBA player to have won an NBA title and Olympic gold medal in the same year twice (1992, 1996). He was a part of the 1992 U.S. Olympic "Dream Team" which beat its opponents by an average of 44 points. Pippen was also a key figure in the 1996 Olympic team, alongside former Dream Team members Karl Malone, John Stockton, and Charles Barkley as well as newer faces such as Anfernee "Penny" Hardaway and Grant Hill. He wore number 8 during both years.

Pippen is a two-time inductee into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (for his individual career, and as a member of the "Dream Team"), being inducted for both on August 13, 2010. On December 8, 2005, the Chicago Bulls retired his number #33, while his college, University of Central Arkansas, retired his number #33 on January 21, 2010, as well.

UAAP Season 42 men's basketball tournament

The 1979 UAAP men's basketball tournament was the 42nd year of the men's tournament of the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP)'s basketball championship. Hosted by University of the Philippines, the FEU Tamaraws defeated the UST Glowing Goldies in the finals taking their tenth overall UAAP men's basketball championship and the first of their three-peat title run from 1979 to 1981. The Tamaraws would eventually achieve the first sweep of the tournament (12-0) the following year and were automatically declared champions. The UAAP have seven teams then with the admission of Ateneo in 1978. This was the last finals match-up between FEU and UST until 2015 in Season 78. This was also the year when the UAAP first implemented the twice to beat finals format.

Wiggenhall St Germans SSSI

Wiggenhall St Germans SSSI is a 5.2-hectare (13-acre) geological Site of Special Scientific Interest south of King's Lynn in Norfolk. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.This site provides evidence for sea level changes during the Quaternary period, the last 2.6 million years. There are three peat layers, interspersed with fine-grained clastic rocks, and they have been studied with pollen and foraminifera analyses.A public footpath crosses the site.

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