Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke and 5th Earl of Montgomery, KG, PC, PRS (c. 1656 – 22 January 1733), styled The Honourable Thomas Herbert until 1683, was an English and later British statesman during the reigns of William III and Anne.


The Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke by John Greenhill
Thomas Herbert by John Greenhill
First Lord of the Admiralty
In office
1690–1692
MonarchWilliam III and Mary II
Preceded byThe Earl of Torrington
Succeeded byThe Lord Cornwallis
Lord Privy Seal
In office
1692–1699
Preceded byIn Commission
Last held by Lord Halifax
Succeeded byThe Viscount Lonsdale
Lord President of the Council
In office
18 May 1699 – 29 January 1702
MonarchWilliam III
Preceded byThe Duke of Leeds
Succeeded byThe Duke of Somerset
In office
9 July 1702 – 25 November 1708
MonarchAnne
Preceded byThe Duke of Somerset
Succeeded byThe Lord Somers
Coat of arms of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke, 5th Earl of Montgomery, KG, PC, PRS
Coat of arms of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke, 5th Earl of Montgomery, KG, PC, PRS

Background

Herbert was the third son of Philip Herbert, 5th Earl of Pembroke and his wife Catharine Villiers, daughter of Sir William Villiers, 1st Baronet. He was educated at Tonbridge School, Kent. Both of his brothers (the 6th Earl and the 7th Earl) having died without a male heir, he succeeded to the earldoms in 1683.

Public life

Herbert was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Wilton at the two general elections of 1679 and the general election of 1681.[1] He was no longer able to sit in the House of Commons after assuming the peerage in 1683. From 1690 to 1692 as Lord Pembroke, he was First Lord of the Admiralty. He then served as Lord Privy Seal until 1699, being in 1697 the first plenipotentiary of Great Britain at the congress of Ryswick. On two occasions he was Lord High Admiral for a short period; he was also Lord President of the Council and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, while he acted as one of the Lords Justices seven times; and he was President of the Royal Society in 1689–1690.[2] He is the dedicatee of John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Thomas Greenhill's The Art of Embalming.

Marriages and progeny

He married thrice:

References

  1. ^ "HERBERT, Hon. Thomas (c.1656-1733), of Wilton, Wilts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 18 December 2018.
  2. ^  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Pembroke, Earls of" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 21 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 80.
  3. ^ Pedigree of Arundell of Trerice, Vivian, J.L., ed. (1887). The Visitations of Cornwall: comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1530, 1573 & 1620; with additions by J.L. Vivian. Exeter: W. Pollard, p. 14 [1]
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Thomas Mompesson
John Berkenhead
Member of Parliament for Wilton
1679–1683
With: Thomas Penruddocke 1679
Sir John Nicholas 1679–1683
Succeeded by
Sir John Nicholas
Oliver Nicholas
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Torrington
First Lord of the Admiralty
1690–1692
Succeeded by
The Lord Cornwallis
Preceded by
In Commission
Lord Privy Seal
1692–1699
Succeeded by
The Viscount Lonsdale
Preceded by
The Duke of Leeds
Lord President of the Council
1699–1702
Succeeded by
The Duke of Somerset
Preceded by
The Earl of Bridgewater
(First Lord of the Admiralty)
Lord High Admiral
1701–1702
Succeeded by
Prince George of Denmark
Preceded by
The Duke of Somerset
Lord President of the Council
1702–1708
Succeeded by
The Lord Somers
Preceded by
The Duke of Ormonde
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
1707–1708
Succeeded by
The Earl of Wharton
Preceded by
Queen Anne
Lord High Admiral
1708–1709
Succeeded by
The Earl of Orford
(First Lord of the Admiralty)
Military offices
New regiment Colonel of the 2nd Maritime Regiment
1690–1691
Succeeded by
Henry Killigrew
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Pembroke
Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire
jointly with The Earl of Yarmouth 1688–1689

1683–1733
Succeeded by
The Earl of Pembroke
Custos Rotulorum of Glamorgan
1683–1728
Succeeded by
The Duke of Bolton
Custos Rotulorum of Pembrokeshire
1683–1715
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Owen, Bt
Preceded by
The Earl of Macclesfield
Lord Lieutenant of Pembrokeshire
1694–1715
Lord Lieutenant of Brecknockshire and Monmouthshire
1694–1715
Succeeded by
John Morgan
Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire
1694–1715
Succeeded by
The Viscount Lisburne
Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire
1694–1715
Vacant
Title next held by
George Rice
Lord Lieutenant of Glamorgan
1694–1715
Vacant
Title next held by
The Duke of Bolton
Lord Lieutenant of Radnorshire
1694–1715
Succeeded by
The Lord Coningsby
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Philip Herbert
Earl of Pembroke
1683–1733
Succeeded by
Henry Herbert
Barbara Herbert, Countess of Pembroke

Barbara Herbert, Countess of Pembroke (c.1668 – 1 August 1721) was a British court official and noble, the second wife of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke.

The daughter of Sir Thomas Slingsby, 2nd Baronet, and his wife, Dorothy Cradock. Barbara had two brothers: Sir Henry Slingsby, 3rd Baronet (c.1660-1691), and Sir Thomas Slingsby, 4th Baronet (c.1668-1726)

She was married three times in all. Her first marriage was to Sir Richard Mauleverer, 4th Baronet, of Allerton Mauleverer, who died in 1689. On 14 February 1692/93, she married her second husband, John Arundell, 2nd Baron Arundell of Trerice (1649–1698), of Trerice, Cornwall, who died in 1698. As Lady Arundell, she had a son, Hon. Richard Arundell (1698-1759), who became MP for Knaresborough, Clerk of the Pipe, Surveyor of the Works and Master of the Mint.She married the Earl of Pembroke on 21 September 1708, in London. The earl and countess had one daughter, Lady Barbara Herbert (died 27 December 1752), who on 3 October 1730 married Edward Dudley North.

In 1718, the countess became a Lady of the Bedchamber to the Princess of Wales, Caroline of Ansbach, retaining the position until her own death three years later.

Custos Rotulorum of Glamorgan

This is a list of people who have served as Custos Rotulorum of Glamorgan.

William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke 1543–1570

Henry Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke 1570–1601

Sir John Herbert 1601–1603

William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke 1603–1630

Philip Herbert, 4th Earl of Pembroke 1630–1645

Sir John Aubrey, 1st Baronet 1645–1646

Interregnum

Philip Herbert, 5th Earl of Pembroke 1660–1669

William Herbert, 6th Earl of Pembroke 1670–1674

Philip Herbert, 7th Earl of Pembroke 1674–1683

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke 1683–1728

Charles Paulet, 3rd Duke of Bolton 1728–1754For later custodes rotulorum, see Lord Lieutenant of Glamorgan.

Custos Rotulorum of Pembrokeshire

This is a list of people who have served as Custos Rotulorum of Pembrokeshire.

John Vaughan bef. 1544 – bef. 1558

Thomas Cathern bef. 1558 – bef. 1562

Sir John Perrot bef. 1562–1592

Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex bef. 1594–1601

Sir James Perrot 1601 – aft. 1608

Sir William Wogan bef. 1621–1625

William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke 1625–1630

Philip Herbert, 4th Earl of Pembroke 1630–1643

Richard Vaughan, 2nd Earl of Carbery 1643–1646

Interregnum

Philip Herbert, 5th Earl of Pembroke 1660–1669

William Herbert, 6th Earl of Pembroke 1670–1674

Philip Herbert, 7th Earl of Pembroke 1674–1683

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke 1683–1715

Sir Arthur Owen, 3rd Baronet 1715–1753For later custodes rotulorum, see Lord Lieutenant of Pembrokeshire.

Earl of Carnarvon

Earl of Carnarvon is a title that has been created three times in British history. The current holder is George Herbert, 8th Earl of Carnarvon. The town and county in Wales to which the title refers are now usually spelled Caernarfon.

Earl of Montgomery

The title Earl of Montgomery (pronounced "Mun-gum-ery") was created in the Peerage of England in 1605 for Sir Philip Herbert, younger son of the 2nd Earl of Pembroke. The first Earl inherited the Earldom of Pembroke in 1630 from his brother, the 3rd Earl, and the two titles remain united.

Philip Herbert, 4th Earl of Pembroke, 1st Earl of Montgomery (1584–1649)

Philip Herbert, 5th Earl of Pembroke, 2nd Earl of Montgomery (1621–1669)

William Herbert, 6th Earl of Pembroke, 3rd Earl of Montgomery (1642–1674)

Philip Herbert, 7th Earl of Pembroke, 4th Earl of Montgomery (c. 1652–1683)

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke, 5th Earl of Montgomery (1656–c. 1732)

Henry Herbert, 9th Earl of Pembroke, 6th Earl of Montgomery (1693–1750)

Henry Herbert, 10th Earl of Pembroke, 7th Earl of Montgomery (1734–1794)

George Augustus Herbert, 11th Earl of Pembroke, 8th Earl of Montgomery (1759–1827)

Robert Henry Herbert, 12th Earl of Pembroke, 9th Earl of Montgomery (1791–1862)

George Robert Charles Herbert, 13th Earl of Pembroke, 10th Earl of Montgomery (1850–1895)

Sidney Herbert, 14th Earl of Pembroke, 11th Earl of Montgomery (1853–1913)

Reginald Herbert, 15th Earl of Pembroke, 12th Earl of Montgomery (1880–1960)

Sidney Charles Herbert, 16th Earl of Pembroke, 13th Earl of Montgomery (1906–1969)

Henry George Charles Alexander Herbert, 17th Earl of Pembroke, 14th Earl of Montgomery (1939–2003)

William Alexander Sidney Herbert, 18th Earl of Pembroke, 15th Earl of Montgomery (b. 1978)The heir apparent is the present holder's only son Reginald Henry Michael Herbert, Lord Herbert (b. 2012).

Henry Herbert, 9th Earl of Pembroke

Lt.-Gen. Henry Herbert, 9th Earl of Pembroke, 6th Earl of Montgomery (29 January 1693 – 9 January 1749) was an English peer and courtier. He was the heir and eldest son of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1656 – 1733) and his first wife Margaret Sawyer. He was styled Lord Herbert from birth until he inherited his father's earldoms of Pembroke and Montgomery in 1733.

John Mordaunt (MP)

The Honourable John Mordaunt (c. 1709 – 1 July 1767) was a British Army officer and politician.

Mordaunt was the second son of John Mordaunt, Viscount Mordaunt and Frances Powlett and educated at Westminster School. He joined the Army as a cornet in the Royal Horse Guards from 1726 to 1736. In 1745, during the Jacobite Rebellion, he rejoined the Army to serve as the lieutenant colonel of the Duke of Kingston's Regiment of Light Horse, which he commanded at the Battle of Culloden.

He was elected to Parliament in 1739 as the member for Nottinghamshire, sitting until 1747, and was then elected to represent Winchelsea until 1754. He lastly sat for Christchurch from 1754 to 1761.He died in 1767. He had married in November, 1735 the Hon. Mary Howe (d. 1749), the daughter of Scrope Howe, 1st Viscount Howe and the widow of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke. He secondly married Elizabeth Hamilton, but left no children by either wife.

List of Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1685

This is a list of Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1685.

Lord Lieutenant of Brecknockshire

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Brecknockshire. After 1723, all Lord Lieutenants were also Custos Rotulorum of Brecknockshire. The office was abolished on 31 March 1974 and replaced with the Lord Lieutenant of Powys, with Deputy Lieutenants for Brecknockshire.

Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire. After 1780, all Lord Lieutenants were also Custos Rotulorum of Cardiganshire. The office was abolished on 31 March 1974, and replaced by the Lord Lieutenant of Dyfed.

Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire. After 1762, all Lord Lieutenants were also Custos Rotulorum of Carmarthenshire. The office was abolished on 31 March 1974 and replaced by the Lord Lieutenant of Dyfed.

Lord Lieutenant of Glamorgan

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Glamorgan. After 1729, all Lords Lieutenant were also Custos Rotulorum of Glamorgan. The post was abolished on 31 March 1974.

Lord Lieutenant of Monmouthshire

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Monmouthshire. Before the English Civil War, the lieutenancy of Monmouthshire was held by the Lord Lieutenant of Wales, except for the period from 1602 to 1629, when it formed a separate lieutenancy in conjunction with Glamorgan. After the English Restoration in 1660, it was again held by the Lord Lieutenant of Wales from 1672 until 1694, when the twelve central Welsh lieutenancies were divided. After 1715 each office holder was also Custos Rotulorum of Monmouthshire. The combined position was finally abolished on 31 March 1974 and replaced with that of the Lord Lieutenant of Gwent.

Henry Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke 24 February 1587 – 19 January 1601

Edward Somerset, 4th Earl of Worcester 17 July 1602 – 3 March 1628 jointly with

Henry Somerset, 5th Earl of Worcester 3 December 1626 – 9 May 1629

William Compton, 1st Earl of Northampton 9 May 1629 – 24 June 1630

John Egerton, 1st Earl of Bridgewater 11 July 1631 – 1642

Interregnum

Henry Somerset, 1st Duke of Beaufort 30 July 1660 – 22 March 1689

Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield 22 March 1689 – 7 January 1694

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke 11 May 1694 – 7 October 1715

John Morgan 7 October 1715 – 7 March 1720

Sir William Morgan 21 June 1720 – 24 April 1731

Thomas Morgan 18 June 1731 – 12 April 1769

Thomas Morgan 27 January 1770 – 15 May 1771

Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort 23 December 1771 – 11 October 1803

Henry Somerset, 6th Duke of Beaufort 4 November 1803 – 2 December 1835

Capel Hanbury Leigh 24 December 1835 – 28 September 1861

Benjamin Hall, 1st Baron Llanover 9 November 1861 – 27 April 1867

Henry Somerset, 8th Duke of Beaufort 21 May 1867 – 30 April 1899

Godfrey Morgan, 1st Viscount Tredegar 23 June 1899 – 11 March 1913

Ivor Herbert, 1st Baron Treowen 4 April 1913 – 18 October 1933

Courtenay Morgan, 1st Viscount Tredegar 4 December 1933 – 3 May 1934

Sir Henry Mather-Jackson, 3rd Baronet 1 June 1934 – 23 March 1942

FitzRoy Somerset, 4th Baron Raglan 27 April 1942 – 14 September 1964

Edward Roderick Hill 15 February 1965 – 31 March 1974

Lord Lieutenant of Wales

The Lord Lieutenant of Wales was an office associated with the Lord President of the Council of Wales and the Marches until the abolition of that body in 1689. The Lord Presidents of Wales were also Lord Lieutenants of Wales, except for the years 1602–1629, when the county of Glamorgan (as well as the Marcher county of Monmouthshire) formed a separate lieutenancy. Before the English Civil War, the Lord Presidents were also Lord Lieutenant of Herefordshire, Monmouthshire, Shropshire and Worcestershire, except as mentioned above; however, this practice did not continue after the English Restoration in 1660.

The last Lord President, Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, retained the Lord-Lieutenancy of all Wales until his death in 1694, when the counties of North Wales were placed under William Stanley, 9th Earl of Derby and South Wales under Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke.

Robert Sawyer (Attorney General)

Sir Robert Sawyer, of Highclere (1633–1692) was the Attorney General for England and Wales (1681–1687) and, briefly, Speaker of the English House of Commons.

Robert was a younger son of Sir Edmund Sawyer, of Heywood Lodge, at White Waltham, in Berkshire, who was Auditor of the Exchequer. He attended Magdalene College, Cambridge, where he was a contemporary of Samuel Pepys and later became a benefactor of the library there. Upon leaving university, he became a barrister of the Inner Temple and took part in a number of well-known cases. He later became treasurer of Inner Temple.

Sawyer was elected MP for High Wycombe in 1673 and was knighted four years later. He was elected speaker in 1678, but had to resign in under a month because of health problems. Three years later he was made attorney-general. Sir Robert prosecuted members of the Rye House Plot and also Titus Oates. He returned to private practice, and scored a great triumph as defence counsel in the Trial of the Seven Bishops

Sawyer settled at Highclere in Hampshire where he built the house that preceded the present castle. He died on 30 July 1692 and was buried in the old church there.

He married Margaret Suckeley and their daughter Margaret Sawyer married Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke. Their descendants the Earls of Carnarvon eventually inherited Highclere. He also had a son George, and through George's daughter Catherine was ancestor of the Marquess of Anglesey.

Sir William Morice, 3rd Baronet

Sir William Morice, 3rd Baronet (c. 1707 – 24 January 1750) of Werrington Park (then in Devon but now in Cornwall) was an English Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1727 to 1750.

Morice was the only son of Sir Nicholas Morice, 2nd Baronet and his wife Lady Catherine Herbert, the daughter of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke. He was educated at Salisbury School, and matriculated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford on 24 August 1724, aged 17. In 1726 he succeeded his father to the baronetcy and Werrington.Morice was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament (MP) for Newport at the 1727 British general election. He was sometime Recorder of Launceston and at the 1734 British general election he was returned in a contest as MP for Launceston. He contributed to the election fund raised by the Cornish Tories in 1741 and was returned unopposed for Launceston at the 1741 British general election. He voted regularly with the Opposition with the exception of the vote on the Bossiney election petition in December that year when he voted with the Government. As an injured husband himself, he was persuaded in this case by Lord Abergavenny whose wife had been seduced by one of the opposition candidates, Richard Liddell. In 1744 Morice came into conflict with the Duke of Bedford over hunting rights near Werrington. He was returned unopposed again at the 1747 British general election. Bedford purchased an estate at Newport, and in 1748 began unsuccessfully to attack Morice in his boroughs.Morice married Lady Lucy Wharton, the daughter of Thomas Wharton, 1st Marquess of Wharton, in 1731. They were divorced in 1738 and he married secondly in 1741, Anna Bury, the daughter of Thomas Bury of Berrynarbor, Devon. He died on 17 January 1750 without issue and the baronetcy became extinct. Werrington was sold in 1775 to Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Thomas Herbert

Thomas Herbert may refer to:

Thomas Herbert (MP for Monmouthshire), see Monmouthshire (UK Parliament constituency)

Thomas Herbert (seaman) (1597–1642?)

Sir Thomas Herbert, 1st Baronet (1606–1682), traveller and historian

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1656–1733), statesman and President of the Royal Society, MP for Wilton 1679–1683

Thomas Herbert (died 1739) (c.1695–1739), British army officer and politician, MP for Newport (Cornwall) 1726–1739

Thomas Herbert (Royal Navy officer) (1793–1861), British naval officer

Thomas Arnold Herbert (1863–1940), Member of Parliament for Wycombe, 1906–1910

Thomas J. Herbert (1894–1974), Governor of Ohio

Thomas M. Herbert (1927–2014), judge from Ohio

Thomas Herbert (died 1739)

Thomas Herbert (c.1695–1739) was a British army officer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1726 to 1739.

Herbert was the fourth son of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke, MP, and his first wife Margaret Sawyer, daughter of Sir Robert Sawyer of Highclere Castle. He joined the army and was lieutenant and captain in the 1st Foot Guards in 1719.Herbert was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Newport (Cornwall) on the interest of his first cousin, Sir William Morice at a by-election on 18 February 1726. He was returned unopposed again at the 1727 general election and voted with the Administration on the civil list arrears in 1729 and on the army in 1732. He became a captain and lieutenant colonel in 1730 and became Mayor of Wilton in 1732. At the 1734 general election he was returned again unopposed for Newport and voted with the Government on the repeal of the Septennial Act in 1734 and the Spanish convention in 1739. He was appointed paymaster to the Gibraltar garrison and equerry to the King in 1735 and was appointed Commissioner for Revenue in Ireland in 1737

Herbert died unmarried on 25 December 1739. His brothers Hon. Nicholas, Robert Sawyer and William Herbert were also MPs..

William Herbert (British Army officer)

Major-General The Hon. William Herbert (c. 1696 – 31 March 1757) was a British Army officer and politician. He was the fifth son of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke by his wife Margaret, daughter of Sir Robert Sawyer of Highclere.

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