Third baseman

A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'.

The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory.

Third base is known as the "hot corner", because the third baseman is relatively close to the batter and most right-handed hitters tend to hit the ball hard in this direction. A third baseman must possess good hand-eye coordination and quick reactions in order to catch hard line drives sometimes in excess of 125 miles per hour (201 km/h).[1] Third basemen often must begin in a position even closer to the batter if a bunt is expected, creating a hazard if the ball is instead hit sharply. As with middle infielders, right-handed throwing players are standard at the position because they do not need to turn their body before throwing across the infield to first base. Mike Squires, who played fourteen games at third base in 1982 and 1983, is a very rare example of a third baseman who threw lefty.[2][3] Some third basemen have been converted from middle infielders or outfielders because the position does not require them to run as fast.

Expectations of how well a third baseman should be able to hit have varied a great deal over time; in the early years of the sport, these expectations were similar to those for shortstops, the third baseman being merely the less skilled defensive player. Players who could hit with more ability often were not suited for third base, either because they were left-handed or because they were not mobile enough for the position. However, the beginning of the live-ball era in the 1920s created a greater demand for more offense, and third basemen have since been expected to hit either for a high average (.290 or better) or with moderate to substantial power. Since the 1950s the position has become more of a power position with sluggers such as Eddie Mathews, Mike Schmidt and Ron Santo becoming stars.

There are fewer third basemen in the Baseball Hall of Fame than there are Hall of Famers of any other position. Furthermore, with the notable exception of John McGraw and Bobby Cox, few third basemen have gone on to have successful managing careers, with Jimmy Dykes and Negro Leaguer Dave Malarcher being perhaps the next most prominent managers who began their careers at third base.

Baseball 3B
The position of the third baseman
David Wright - 2007-05-18
David Wright, was the third baseman for the New York Mets from 2004 to 2018.

Prominent third basemen

Baseball Hall of Fame members

Multiple Gold Glove Award winners

All time single-season assists leaders among third basemen

  1. Graig Nettles: 412 (Cleveland Indians, 1971)
  2. Graig Nettles: 410 (New York Yankees, 1973)
  3. Brooks Robinson: 410 (Baltimore Orioles, 1974)
  4. Brooks Robinson: 405 (Baltimore Orioles, 1967)
  5. Harlond Clift: 405 (St. Louis Browns, 1937)
  6. Mike Schmidt: 404 (Philadelphia Phillies, 1974)
  7. Doug DeCinces: 399 (California Angels, 1982)
  8. Brandon Inge: 398 (Detroit Tigers, 2006)
  9. Clete Boyer: 396 (New York Yankees, 1962)
  10. Mike Schmidt: 396 (Philadelphia Phillies, 1977)
  11. Buddy Bell: 396 (Texas Rangers, 1982)

All time single-season putouts leaders among third basemen

  1. Denny Lyons: 255 (Philadelphia Athletics, 1887)
  2. Jimmy Williams: 251 (Pittsburgh Pirates, 1899)
  3. Jimmy Collins: 251 (Boston Beaneaters [National League], 1900)
  4. Jimmy Collins: 243 (Boston Beaneaters [National League], 1898)
  5. Willie Kamm: 243 (Chicago White Sox, 1928)
  6. Willie Kamm: 236 (Chicago White Sox, 1927)
  7. Frank Baker: 233 (Philadelphia Athletics, 1913)
  8. Bill Coughlin: 232 (Washington Senators, 1901)
  9. Ernie Courtney: 229 (Philadelphia Phillies, 1905)
  10. Jimmy Austin: 228 (St. Louis Browns, 1911)

References

  1. ^ Brian A. Raue PhD page
  2. ^ Mike Squires page
  3. ^ Lefty 3B since 1919
1969 Major League Baseball draft

The 1969 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1969 MLB season. The draft featured future Hall of Famers Bert Blyleven (pick 55) and Dave Winfield (pick 882).

2012 Major League Baseball draft

The 2012 Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft was held from June 4 through June 6, 2012, from Studio 42 of the MLB Network in Secaucus, New Jersey. The Houston Astros, with the first overall pick, selected Carlos Correa from the Puerto Rico Baseball Academy and High School.

2013 Major League Baseball draft

The 2013 Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft was held from June 6 through June 8, 2013. The first two rounds were broadcast from Studio 42 of the MLB Network in Secaucus, New Jersey.

Each team received one selection per round, going in reverse order of the 2012 MLB season final standings. In addition, teams could receive compensation draft picks if they had made a qualifying offer to a free agent player from their team, and the player rejected the offer and signed with another team.

Baseball positions

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. Within the game there are positions in which each player can play in.

There are nine fielding positions in baseball. Each position conventionally has an associated number, which is used to score putouts:

1 (pitcher), 2 (catcher), 3 (first baseman), 4 (second baseman), 5 (third baseman), 6 (shortstop), 7 (left fielder), 8 (center fielder), and 9 (right fielder).For example:

If the third baseman fields a ball and throws it to first, it is recorded as a 5-3 out.

A double play where the second baseman fields, throws to the shortstop covering second base, who throws to the first baseman, is recorded as a 4-6-3 double play. This is not the only way to make a double play.

Bobby Brown (third baseman)

Robert William Brown (born October 25, 1924) is a former third baseman and executive in professional baseball who served as president of the American League from 1984 to 1994. He also was a physician who studied for his medical degree during his eight-year (1946-52, 1954) career as a player with the New York Yankees.

Dave Roberts (third baseman)

David Wayne Roberts (born February 17, 1951), is a former professional baseball third baseman and catcher, who played all or part of ten seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres, Texas Rangers, Houston Astros, and Philadelphia Phillies, between 1972 and 1982.

Ed Sprague Jr.

Edward Nelson Sprague Jr. (born July 25, 1967) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman. He played 11 seasons in the major leagues from 1991 to 2001, with six different teams. He later served as the head baseball coach of the NCAA's Pacific Tigers for 12 seasons, from 2004 to 2015. He is now the Oakland Athletics Coordinator of Instruction.

Infielder

An infielder is a baseball player stationed at one of four defensive "infield" positions on the baseball field.

Jimmy Burke (baseball)

James Timothy Burke (October 12, 1874 – March 26, 1942) was a Major League Baseball third baseman, coach, and manager. He played for the Cleveland Spiders, St. Louis Perfectos, Milwaukee Brewers, Chicago White Stockings, Pittsburgh Pirates, and St. Louis Cardinals.

Burke was the regular third baseman for the Cardinals from 1903 to 1905. He was named player-manager in the middle of the 1905, season but was replaced by Stanley Robison after amassing a record of 34–56.

From 1914 through 1917, Burke was a coach for the Detroit Tigers. He then served as manager for the St. Louis Browns from 1918 through 1920. In 1921, he became a coach for the Boston Red Sox, a position he held for three seasons. Burke later was a coach for the Chicago Cubs from 1926 through 1930, and was last a coach with the New York Yankees from 1931 through 1933.

John Kennedy (third baseman)

John Edward Kennedy (May 29, 1941 – August 9, 2018) was an American major league baseball third baseman, shortstop and second baseman. He played from 1962 to 1974 for the Washington Senators, Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots, Milwaukee Brewers, and Boston Red Sox.

José Bautista

José Antonio Bautista Santos (born October 19, 1980) is a Dominican professional baseball right fielder and third baseman who is a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles, Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Kansas City Royals, Pittsburgh Pirates, Toronto Blue Jays, Atlanta Braves, New York Mets, and Philadelphia Phillies.

Bautista’s professional career began when the Pittsburgh Pirates selected him in the 20th round of the 2000 Major League Baseball draft. In 2010, he became the 26th member of the 50 home run club, while leading MLB in home runs for the first of two consecutive seasons. From 2010–2015, Bautista hit more home runs than any player in the major leagues. An MLB All-Star selection six consecutive times, he has won three Silver Slugger Awards and two Hank Aaron Awards. In addition, he has received the American League (AL) Player of the Month Award, five times, and the AL Player of the Week, four times. Before being traded to the Blue Jays, Bautista primarily played third base.

Although major league scouts initially took note of Bautista while he was in junior college for his batting skills – including power hitting potential and a strong throwing arm – his career would take many detours, until Bautista finally realized his potential, in 2010. He made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2004, and, that year, became the first player ever to appear on five MLB rosters in one season. The last of those clubs was the Pirates, where he would spend four-plus seasons, seeing time as a utility player, while playing at six different positions, including designated hitter (DH).Bautista was then traded to the Blue Jays, in August 2008. After making adjustments to his swing, he broke through with ten home runs in September 2009. Bautista has since been voted in the top ten in the AL Most Valuable Player Award four times, and is a leader or among the top ten in numerous offensive single-season and career categories in Blue Jays' franchise history.From 2010 to 2017, Bautista hit at least 20 home runs each year, and in four of those seasons, hit at least 35 home runs, both scored and drove in at least 100 runs, and drew at least 100 bases on balls, including twice leading the AL. In 2015, while playing in the playoffs for the first time, his bat flip in the American League Division Series (ALDS) caused a sensation that became a symbol of Toronto's first playoff appearance in 22 years. In 2011, Bautista set up a program that assists athletes from the Dominican Republic to attend universities in the United States.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a third baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'.

The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory.

Arlie Latham is the all-time leader in errors committed as a third baseman with 822 career. Latham is the only third baseman to commit more than 700 or 800 career errors. Billy Nash is second all-time and the only other third baseman to commit more than 600 errors.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a third baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'.

The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory.

Brooks Robinson is the all-time leader in career putouts as a third baseman with 2,697. Robinson is the only third baseman with more than 2,500 career putouts.

List of second-generation Major League Baseball players

The following is a list of father-and-son combinations who have played or managed in Major League Baseball (MLB).

Matt Chapman

Matt James Chapman (born April 28, 1993) is an American professional baseball third baseman for the Oakland Athletics of Major League Baseball (MLB). In 2018 he won a Fielding Bible Award, Gold Glove Award, and Wilson Defensive Player of the Year Award.

Matt Williams (third baseman)

Matthew Derrick Williams (born November 28, 1965), nicknamed "Matt the Bat" and "The Big Marine" is a former professional baseball third baseman and current third base coach for the Oakland Athletics. A right-handed batter, Williams played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Francisco Giants, the Cleveland Indians, and the Arizona Diamondbacks. He was the manager of the Washington Nationals from 2014 to 2015.

Williams played in a World Series for each of these teams (1989 with the Giants, 1997 with the Indians, and 2001 with the Diamondbacks in which he won over the New York Yankees). During these years, Williams became the only player to hit at least one World Series home run for three different Major League baseball teams. During his career, Williams had an overall batting average of .268, with 378 home runs and 1218 runs batted in (RBIs). He scored 997 Major League runs, and he accumulated 1878 hits, 338 doubles, and 35 triples, while playing in 1866 regular-season games. As of August, 2015 – 13 years after his final game – he still ranks in the top 75 all-time players for career home runs and the top 150 all-time players for career RBIs.

Mike Bell (third baseman)

Michael John Bell (born December 7, 1974) is currently the Director of Player Development for the Arizona Diamondbacks, former coach for the Visalia Rawhide and the Yakima Bears, and former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds in the 2000 season. He is the brother of David Bell, son of Buddy Bell and grandson of Gus Bell.

Pie Traynor

Harold Joseph "Pie" Traynor (November 11, 1898 – March 16, 1972) was an American professional baseball player, manager, scout and radio broadcaster. He played his entire Major League Baseball (MLB) career (1920–37) as a third baseman with the Pittsburgh Pirates. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1948.Following the Second World War, Traynor was often cited as the greatest third baseman in MLB history. In recent years his reputation has diminished, with the modern-era careers of third basemen such as Eddie Mathews, Brooks Robinson, Mike Schmidt and George Brett moving to the forefront in the memories of baseball fans.

Willie Jones (baseball)

Willie Edward Jones (August 16, 1925 – October 18, 1983), nicknamed "Puddin' Head", was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1947–1959), Cleveland Indians (1959) and Cincinnati Reds (1959–1961). He batted and threw right-handed.

In a 15-season career, Jones was a .258 hitter with 190 home runs and 812 RBI in 1691 games played.

Born in Dillon, South Carolina, Jones grew up in and listed Laurel Hill, North Carolina, as his home. A World War II veteran of the United States Navy, Jones started his major league career with the Phillies in 1947. By 1949, he became the team's starting third baseman, and held that position until 1959. Jones was the top fielding third baseman in the National League during the 1950s. He led the league in fielding percentage five times, in putouts for seven years (also tying a record), and twice in assists and double plays. He was married and divorced to Carolyn, by whom he had three children, Eddie, Kathie, and Bradley.

Jones' most productive season came as a member of the fabulous 1950 "Whiz Kids" National League champion team, when he posted career-highs in home runs (25), RBI (88), runs (100), hits (163), and led the league in games played (157). In 1951 he hit 22 homers with 81 RBI and a career-high .285 batting average. He was selected for the All-Star Game in both seasons.

In 1959, Jones was part of successive trades between the Phillies, Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds. He finished his career with Cincinnati in 1961.

Jones died of cancer in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he had lived after his playing days were over, at the age of 58.

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