The Tuscaloosa News

The Tuscaloosa News is a daily newspaper serving Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States, and the surrounding area in west central Alabama.

Tuscalnewsriverwalk
Tuscaloosa News headquarters seen from the Riverwalk

In 2012, Halifax Media Group acquired the Tuscaloosa News. Prior to that, the paper's owner was The New York Times Company.[1] The New York Times Company acquired the News in 1985 from the Public Welfare Foundation, a charitable entity.[2] The News had been donated to that foundation by its owner Edward Marsh, along with other newspapers he owned, before his death in 1964.[3]

In 2015, Halifax was acquired by GateHouse Media (legally known as New Media Inverstment Group).[4]

The News has a 12-month average circulation of 32,700 daily and 34,600 Sunday.[5] Of the 25 daily newspapers published in Alabama, the News has the fifth-highest daily circulation.[6] Beginning in 2001, the News constructed and occupied a new 90,000-square-foot (8,400 m2) facility overlooking the Black Warrior River.[7]

The Tuscaloosa News has received two Pulitzer Prizes. The first was in 1957, when the paper won the prize for editorial writing, by Buford Boone on the issue of segregation at the University of Alabama.[8] The second Pulitzer Prize was awarded for the paper's outstanding reporting on the tornado outbreaks of April 25 to 28, 2011.[9]

Because Tuscaloosa is home to the University of Alabama, the News places particular emphasis on coverage of its sports programs, and maintains a separate website for that coverage. Besides its editorial offices in Tuscaloosa, the News maintains a state capital bureau in Montgomery.[10]

Since late 2012, the Tuscaloosa News has become available in the Birmingham, Alabama, area. The reason for its expansion into Birmingham is to fill a perceived void in the market when the Birmingham News cut back publication into three days a week earlier in the year.

The Tuscaloosa News
Tuscaloosa News Front
The November 3, 2008 front cover of The Tuscaloosa News
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)New Media Investment Group, Inc.
EditorMichael James
Founded1818
Headquarters315 28th Avenue
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401
Circulation26,000 Daily
29,700 Sunday
WebsiteThe Tuscaloosa News

Awards

2018 Better Newspaper Contest - Alabama Press Association[11]

Year Award Place Recipient
2018 Best Business Story of Column 1st Ed Enoch
2018 Best Sports News In-Depth Coverage 1st The Tuscaloosa News
2018 Best Use of Graphics or Illustrations 1st The Tuscaloosa News
2018 Best Headline 1st Ken Roberts
2018 Best One Time Special Section - Newsprint or Glossy 1st The Tuscaloosa News
2018 Best Niche Publication - Newsprint or Glossy 1st The Tuscaloosa News

References

  1. ^ Halifax Media purchases 16 newspapers Archived January 9, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Times Co. In Pact for 3 Dailies," The New York Times, January 15, 1985, p. D21
  3. ^ PR Newswire, January 14, 1985
  4. ^ New Media Announces Agreement to Acquire Halifax Media Group for $280.0 Million Archived 2016-03-07 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ New York Times Company Business Units Archived March 24, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ Alabama Press Association: 2008 Ratesheet Archived June 25, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Warehouse Sites Allow 'Bama Dailies to Build in Downtown Areas," Editor and Publisher Magazine, November 5, 2001, p. 22
  8. ^ Pulitzer Prizes: 1957
  9. ^ Pulitzer Prizes: 2012
  10. ^ The Tuscaloosa News: Staff Listing
  11. ^ Langan, Jaclyn. "APA Better Newspaper Contest Award Winners Announced" (PDF). Alabama Press Association. Retrieved 13 July 2018.

External links

1934 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1934 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1934 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 41st overall season and 2nd as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a perfect record (10–0 overall, 7–0 in the SEC), as Southeastern Conference champions for the second consecutive season and defeated Stanford in the Rose Bowl.Five of the 13 selectors recognized as official by the NCAA (Berryman, Dunkel, Houlgate, Poling, and Williamson) recognize the 1934 Alabama team as the national champion. Sportswriter Morgan Blake called it the best football team he ever saw.

1937 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1937 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1937 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 44th overall and 5th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his seventh year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of nine wins and one loss (9–1 overall, 6–0 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a loss against California in the 1938 Rose Bowl.

The Crimson Tide opened the season with three consecutive shutouts against Howard, Sewanee and South Carolina. In their fourth game, Alabama surrendered their first points of the season on defense in their 14–7 victory over Tennessee. They then shutout their next two opponents, George Washington and Kentucky prior to their game at Tulane. Against the Green Wave, the Crimson Tide won 9–6 on a game-winning fourth-quarter field goal by Hayward Sanford. After their sixth shutout of the season against Georgia Tech, Alabama won their second game of the season on a fourth quarter Sanford field goal against Vanderbilt, and clinched the SEC championship with the win. With their undefeated regular season, Alabama accepted an invitation to play in the 1938 Rose Bowl where they lost 13–0 to California.

1938 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1938 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1938 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 45th overall and 6th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, one loss and one tie (7–1–1 overall, 4–1–1 in the SEC).

The Crimson Tide opened the season with a 19–7 victory in an intersectional contest against USC at Los Angeles. They then followed up the win with consecutive shutouts, home victories over non-conference opponents Howard and NC State on homecoming. However, Alabama then was shut out 13–0 by Tennessee, their first loss against the Volunteers since 1932. The Crimson Tide then rebounded with victories against Sewanee, Kentucky and Tulane. After a 14–14 tie against Georgia Tech, Alabama defeated Vanderbilt in their season finale.

With a final record of 7–1–1, Alabama was ranked No. 13 in the final AP Poll of the season. Additionally, after the season the Associated Press recognized Alabama as having the best record (40–4–3) and highest winning percentage (.909) of any major college team for the five-year period between 1934 and 1938. Statistically, the defense was one of the most dominant in school history and still holds numerous defense records.

1941 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1941 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1941 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 48th overall and 9th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his 11th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of nine wins and two losses (9–2 overall, 5–2 in the SEC) and with a victory in the Cotton Bowl Classic over Texas A&M. Alabama also claims a share of the 1941 national championship due to its selection as national champion by the Houlgate System.The Crimson Tide opened the 1941 season with a non-conference victory over Southwestern Louisiana but lost to Mississippi State in the second game of the season. Alabama rebounded with six consecutive victories over Howard, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Tulane and Georgia Tech. As they entered their game against Vanderbilt, the Crimson Tide was ranked No. 7 in the AP Poll, but were upset 7–0 in Nashville. Alabama then closed the regular season with a road victory over Miami and defeated Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

1942 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1942 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1942 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 49th overall and 10th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his 12th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery. They finished the season with a record of eight wins and three losses (8–3 overall, 4–2 in the SEC) and with a victory in the Orange Bowl over Boston College.

The Crimson Tide opened the 1942 season with five consecutive victories, four of which were shutouts, and rose to the No. 3 spot in the AP Poll. They outscored their opponents 124 to 6 and defeated Southwestern Louisiana, Mississippi State, a team of former college all-stars playing for the Pensacola NAS, Tennessee and Kentucky. Against No. 2 ranked Georgia, Alabama surrendered a 10–0 fourth quarter lead and lost 21–10 to a Bulldogs squad that went on to capture a share of the 1942 national championship. The Crimson Tide went on to alternate wins and losses over their final four regular season games with victories over both South Carolina and Vanderbilt and losses to Georgia Tech and Georgia Pre-Flight. They then closed the season with a victory over Boston College in the Orange Bowl.

1946 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1946 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1946 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 52nd overall and 13th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his 15th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery. They finished with a record of seven wins and four losses (7–4 overall, 4–3 in the SEC).

After the Crimson Tide opened the season with four consecutive victories over Furman, Tulane, South Carolina and Southwestern Louisiana, Alabama's 14-game winning streak was snapped when they lost to Tennessee 12–0. One week later, the Crimson Tide faced off against Kentucky and their young new coach, Bear Bryant, and won by a score of 21–7, before they lost consecutive games to Georgia and LSU. Alabama then closed the season with a victory over Vanderbilt, a loss to Boston College in their first game ever played in New England, and an upset victory over Mississippi State on homecoming in the season finale.

Over the course of the season, Frank Thomas was riddled with health issues that ultimately led to his resignation as head coach. In January 1947, Harold Drew was named as the 17th head coach of the Crimson Tide.

1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1947 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 53rd overall and 14th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished with a record of eight wins and three losses (8–3 overall, 5–2 in the SEC) and with a loss in the Sugar Bowl.

After the Crimson Tide opened the season with a victory over Mississippi Southern, Alabama lost consecutive. games against Tulane and Vanderbilt to open the season 1–2. However, the Crimson Tide rebounded to win their final seven games against Duquesne, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Georgia Tech, LSU and Miami. Alabama then lost to Texas in the Sugar Bowl to finish the season 8–3.

The 1947 season also marked the first for Harold Drew as head coach for the Crimson Tide. Drew was hired as the replacement for long-time head coach Frank Thomas after he resigned his post due to personal health conditions in January 1947.

1961 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1961 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1961 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 67th overall and 28th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season undefeated with eleven wins (11–0 overall, 7–0 in the SEC), with a victory over Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl and as consensus national champions. The 1961 national championship was the first of the six that Bear Bryant would win as head coach of the Crimson Tide.Alabama opened the season with a win over Georgia on the road in week one, and then defeated Tulane in their home game at Ladd Stadium in week two. After they won their second road game of the season at Vanderbilt, Alabama returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated NC State in the first Denny Stadium game of the season. The next week, Alabama defeated Tennessee for the first time since the 1954 season in the first Legion Field game of the year.

The Crimson Tide then defeated Houston in their final road game of the season and then returned home and defeated Mississippi State on homecoming in Tuscaloosa. The next week Alabama scored their most points in a game since the 1951 season when they defeated Richmond 66–0. They then closed the regular season with wins over Georgia Tech and Auburn in the Iron Bowl and captured the national championship as awarded by the major wire services. The Crimson Tide then closed the season with a victory over Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl.

1964 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1964 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1964 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 70th overall and 31st season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his seventh year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with ten wins and one loss (10–1 overall, 8–0 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a loss to Texas in the Orange Bowl. As the major wire services at that time awarded their national champions prior to the start of bowl season, Alabama was also recognized as national champions by the AP and UPI before their loss to Texas. After the bowl games, the Football Writers Association of America as stated in 1964 NCAA University Division football season named the undefeated Arkansas Razorbacks as the national champions. The Razorbacks defeated Texas during the regular season.

The Crimson Tide opened the season ranked in the No. 6 position with wins at Tuscaloosa against Georgia, against Tulane in Mobile and at Birmingham against Vanderbilt. After a victory over NC State in their first non-conference game of the season, Alabama defeated Tennessee in their first road game of the season at Neyland Stadium. The Crimson Tide then returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated a Steve Spurrier-led Florida team on homecoming before their second road victory at Mississippi State at Jackson.

Alabama then defeated LSU in a newly expanded Legion Field and captured the SEC championship, and the next week defeated Georgia Tech in what was the final game of their annual series. In the annual Iron Bowl against Auburn, the Crimson Tide completed an undefeated regular season with their victory and accepted a bid to play Texas in the Orange Bowl. Although recognized as national champions at the conclusion of the regular season, Alabama closed the season with a loss to the Texas Longhorns in the Orange Bowl.

After the season, Joe Namath was selected as the first overall pick by the New York Jets in the 1965 AFL Draft. In addition to Namath, eleven other lettermen from the 1964 squad were drafted into the National Football League.

1966 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1966 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1966 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 72nd overall and 33rd season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his ninth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season undefeated with eleven wins (11–0 overall, 6–0 in the SEC), as SEC co-champions and with a victory over Nebraska in the Sugar Bowl.

Alabama opened the season with a victory over Louisiana Tech in Birmingham and followed that with a victory at Ole Miss for their first conference win of the season. The Crimson Tide then returned home and defeated Clemson in the first Tuscaloosa game of the season before they traveled to Knoxville for their annual rival game against Tennessee. In the game, Alabama trailed the Volunteers 10–0 in the fourth quarter before they rallied for an 11–10 victory that saw Tennessee miss a game-winning field goal in the final minute of play.

Alabama then alternated home games between Birmingham and Tuscaloosa over the next four weeks and defeated Vanderbilt, Mississippi State, LSU and South Carolina in each game. After they defeated Southern Miss in their annual Mobile game, the Crimson Tide defeated Auburn in the Iron Bowl and captured a share of the SEC championship. In the January that followed, Alabama then defeated Nebraska in the Sugar Bowl and finished the season undefeated. Although they were the only undefeated and untied college team at the conclusion of the year, Alabama was not selected as national champions for the season. On the 1966 squad, Green Bay Packers head coach Vince Lombardi stated: "I don't know, we haven't played Alabama yet" when asked how it felt to have the world's greatest football team for the season after his Packers won Super Bowl I.

1967 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1967 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1967 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 73rd overall and 34th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 10th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with eight wins, two losses and one tie (8–2–1 overall, 5–1 in the SEC) and with a loss against Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

During the spring practice sessions, five African American students attempted to walk-on to the football team. Two of the five, Dock Rone and Andrew Pernell participated in the annual A-Day Game. Although none of the five made it to the varsity squad, their participation as part of the team marked the beginnings of the desegregation of the football program that culminated in the signing of Wilbur Jackson to an athletic scholarship in 1970.

Alabama opened the season ranked #2, but tied unranked Florida State at Birmingham in a game that snapped a 17-game winning streak and surprised many pundits. They rebounded from the tie with victories over Southern Miss in their annual Mobile game, Ole Miss in their first conference game and Vanderbilt in their first road game of the season. In their fifth game against Tennessee, Alabama was defeated 24–13 at Legion Field. The defeat ended a 25-game unbeaten streak for the Crimson Tide that dated back to the 1965 season and was the first for the Volunteers over Alabama since their 1960 season.

After their loss to Tennessee, Alabama again rebounded and won their final five regular season games. After they defeated Clemson at Memorial Stadium, they returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated Mississippi State on homecoming. The Crimson Tide next defeated LSU at Tiger Stadium, South Carolina in Tuscaloosa, and Auburn in the Iron Bowl after Ken Stabler had his famous, 47-yard "run in the mud" touchdown to win the game. In the January that followed, Alabama lost to Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

1968 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1968 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1968 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 74th overall and 35th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 11th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with eight wins and three losses (8–3 overall, 4–2 in the SEC) and with a loss against Missouri in the Gator Bowl.

Alabama opened the season ranked #7 and won their first two games against Virginia Tech at Birmingham and Southern Miss in their annual Mobile game, which proved to be the last game Alabama would play at Ladd Stadium in Mobile. In their third game, the Crimson Tide were upset by Ole Miss at Jackson, their first loss to the Rebels since the 1910 season. They rebounded the next week with a victory over Vanderbilt but lost the next week to Tennessee after coach Bryant elected to go for the victory instead of a tie and missed a two-point conversion and lost 10–9 at Knoxville.

After their loss to Tennessee, Alabama rebounded and won their final five regular season games. After they defeated Clemson, they returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated Mississippi State on homecoming. The Crimson Tide next upset LSU in Birmingham, defeated Miami at the Miami Orange Bowl, and Auburn in the Iron Bowl. Later that December, Alabama lost 35–10 to Missouri in the Gator Bowl.

1971 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1971 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1971 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 77th overall and 38th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 14th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished season with eleven wins and one loss (11–1 overall, 7–0 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a loss to Nebraska in the Orange Bowl.

The 1971 squad was notable for a pair of firsts in Alabama football history. This was the first team that African Americans contributed as members of the Alabama varsity squad, with John Mitchell being the first to actually see playing time. 1971 also marked the first season the Crimson Tide utilized the wishbone offense that Alabama became noted for throughout the remainder of Bryant's tenure as head coach at Alabama.

Alabama opened the season with an upset victory at USC. This was the first game that the wishbone was utilized by the Crimson Tide offense, and their victory was attributed in part to surprising the Trojans with its introduction. They then won their next four games over Southern Miss, Florida, Ole Miss and Vanderbilt and set up a top 20 match-up against Tennessee. In their rival game, the Crimson Tide ended a four-game losing streak to the Vols with their 32–15 victory. After a hard-fought win over Houston and victory over Mississippi State at Jackson, Alabama defeated LSU for their third win over a ranked team on the season.

The Crimson Tide next defeated Miami on homecoming and set up a match-up between undefeated teams for the first time in the history of the Iron Bowl to close the regular season. With both teams ranked in the top five, Alabama defeated Auburn 31–7 and captured the outright SEC football championship. However, they were unable to capture a national championship as they were defeated by No. 1 Nebraska 38–6 to close the season in the Orange Bowl.

1972 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1972 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1972 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 78th overall season and 39th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 15th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with ten wins and two losses (10–2 overall, 7–1 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a loss to Texas in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

Alabama opened the season with a non-conference victory over Duke. They then shut out Kentucky in their conference opener, and then easily won their next three games, over Vanderbilt, Georgia and Florida. In a top-ten match-up against rival Tennessee, they scored a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns en route to a 17–10 victory. Next, the Crimson Tide defeated Southern Miss and Mississippi State to set up a top-ten match-up against LSU.

With a 35–21 victory over the Tigers, Alabama captured the SEC championship for the 1972 season. The Crimson Tide next defeated Virginia Tech on homecoming and set up another top ten match-up Iron Bowl to close the regular season. Auburn defeated Alabama behind a pair of fourth-quarter blocked-punt returns in a game referred to as simply "Punt Bama Punt". The Crimson Tide then closed their season with a second-consecutive defeat, this time against Texas in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

1975 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1975 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 81st overall and 42nd season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 18th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished season with eleven wins and one loss (11–1 overall, 6–0 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a victory over Penn State in the Sugar Bowl.

The 1975 squad entered the season with the No. 2 ranking in the AP Poll and as one of the favorites to compete for the national championship. Their championship hopes were dashed after they were upset by an unranked Missouri team in their season opener at Legion Field. Although Alabama dropped into the No. 14 position prior to their second game against Clemson, they would not lose another game during the season as they climbed up the polls back into a top five position by season's end.

After their shutout over Clemson, Alabama traveled to Nashville in the first road game of the season where they defeated Vanderbilt. The Crimson Tide then returned to Birmingham and defeated Ole Miss the week before their victory over Washington in the first meeting between the schools since the 1926 Rose Bowl. They followed this with wins over Tennessee, TCU, Mississippi State, LSU and Southern Miss on homecoming in Tuscaloosa. The Crimson Tide then closed the season with wins against Auburn in what was Ralph Jordan's final game as the Tigers' head coach and Penn State in the Sugar Bowl that ended an eight-game winless streak (0–7–1) in bowl games, and started a bowl winning streak that went six years.

2010 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2010 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama" or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 116th overall season, 77th as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and its 19th within the SEC Western Division. The team was led by head coach Nick Saban, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of ten wins and three losses (10–3, 5–3 in the SEC) and defeated Michigan State 49–7 in the Capital One Bowl.

Alabama entered the season as defending national champions, and began the 2010 season as the preseason number one team in both the AP and Coaches' Polls. Favored to win a second consecutive SEC championship and be in contention for the national championship, the Crimson Tide opened the season with five consecutive victories over San Jose State, Penn State, Duke, Arkansas and Florida. However, Alabama completed the regular season with only nine victories and losses to South Carolina, LSU and Auburn and finished fourth in the Western Division. After the regular season, the Crimson Tide accepted an invitation to compete in the Capital One Bowl in Orlando. Against Big Ten co-champions Michigan State, Alabama won by a final score of 49–7 and captured both a third straight ten win season and top ten finish.

A-Day (University of Alabama)

A-Day is an annual college football exhibition game set at the conclusion of spring practice by the University of Alabama Crimson Tide. Played on-campus at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, the game features teams composed of offensive starters against defensive starters of the Crimson Tide. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rules allow for member schools to conduct a series of fifteen practice sessions during the spring months. As part of these practices the NCAA allows three 11-on-11 scrimmages, one of which may be conducted as a spring game.Prior to the game, the captains from the previous seasons' team are honored at the annual "Walk of Fame" ceremony at the base of Denny Chimes. In addition to this ceremony, several other memorable events have occurred as part of the annual A-Day festivities. The 1967 edition of the game saw Dock Rone and Andrew Pernell participate and become the first African American players to play at Denny Stadium as members of the Crimson Tide football team. At halftime of the 1976 game, Denny Stadium was officially rededicated as Bryant–Denny Stadium in honor of then head coach Bear Bryant. The 1985 edition of the A-Day game featured a White team of current, varsity starters against a Crimson team of former Alabama players such as Ken Stabler and Ozzie Newsome.Since the arrival of head coach Nick Saban in 2007, A-Day has become a major event. The 2007 game saw an overflow crowd of 92,138 in attendance and served as the catalyst for other programs to make their spring game a larger event. The growth of A-Day has resulted in its being televised nationally by ESPN first in 2009 and again in subsequent years in addition to being utilized to enhance recruiting.

Bryant–Denny Stadium

Bryant–Denny Stadium is an outdoor stadium in the southeastern United States, on the campus of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. It is the home field of the Alabama Crimson Tide football team of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

Opened 89 years ago in 1929, it was originally named Denny Stadium in honor of George H. Denny, the school's president from 1912 to 1932. In 1975, the state legislature added longtime head coach and alumnus Paul "Bear" Bryant to the stadium's name. Bryant led the Tide for seven more seasons, through 1982, and is one of the few in Division I to have coached in a venue bearing his name.

With a seating capacity of 101,821, it is the fourth-largest stadium in the Southeastern Conference, the seventh largest stadium in the United States and the eighth largest stadium in the world.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide players in the College Football Hall of Fame

The Alabama Crimson Tide college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and represents the University of Alabama in the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The College Football Hall of Fame was established in 1951 to honor the careers of selected student-athletes who have competed in college football as either a player or coach. Since its inaugural class that year, Alabama has had 23 persons elected to the Hall of Fame as either a player or coach of the Crimson Tide.The first Alabama inductees into the Hall of Fame were Don Hutson and Frank Thomas as part of the inaugural class in 1951. The most recent inductee was Derrick Thomas as part of the 2014 class.

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