The Town (2010 film)

The Town is a 2010 American crime thriller film co-written, directed by and starring Ben Affleck, adapted from Chuck Hogan's novel Prince of Thieves.[4][5] It also stars Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm, Jeremy Renner, Blake Lively, Titus Welliver, Pete Postlethwaite, and Chris Cooper, and follows a group of Boston bank robbers who set out to get one final score by robbing Fenway Park.

The film premiered on September 8, 2010 at the Venice Film Festival before being released in the United States on September 17, 2010. Based on actual events, it received praise from critics for its direction, screenplay, editing and the performances of the cast (particularly Renner) and grossed $154 million worldwide. The film was chosen by National Board of Review as one of the top ten films of 2010, while Renner was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and Postlethwaite was posthumously nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor.

The Town
The Town Poster
Theatrical release poster
Directed byBen Affleck
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based onPrince of Thieves
by Chuck Hogan
Starring
Music by
CinematographyRobert Elswit
Edited byDylan Tichenor
Production
company
Distributed byWarner Bros. Pictures
Release date
  • September 8, 2010 (Venice)
  • September 17, 2010 (United States)
Running time
124 minutes[1]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$37 million[2]
Box office$154 million[3]

Plot

Four lifelong friends from the Boston neighborhood of Charlestown, Douglas "Doug" MacRay, James "Jem" Coughlin, Albert "Gloansy" MacGloan, and Desmond "Dez" Elden, rob a bank. They take the manager, Claire Keesey, hostage, but release her unharmed. When they find out Claire lives in their neighborhood, Doug begins to follow her to find out how much she has told the police, and to make sure that Jem does not eliminate her as a witness. Soon a romance grows between them, which Doug hides from the gang. As they grow closer, Doug tells Claire of his search for his long-lost mother, who he believes went to live with his aunt in Tangerine, Florida. He also recounts his chance to be a professional hockey player which he threw away for a life of crime, following in his father's footsteps. She in turn tells Doug that she saw a tattoo on one of the robbers, and he realizes that she can identify Jem and send them all to prison. He knows that Jem will kill her if he discovers the truth, so in order to discourage her, he advises her to tell the police, and tells her that the authorities will then put her in witness protection and send her to live in another state. His plan works, and she decides not to tell the police.

After Claire tells Doug about being harassed and her car vandalized by Alex, a local Dominican thug, Doug enlists Jem for a favor, which they can never talk about. Doug and Jem don hockey masks and violently assault the offenders without Jem knowing the true reason for the favor is to protect Claire.

FBI Agent Adam Frawley surveils the gang and recognizes their ties to local crime lord Fergus "Fergie" Colm, who has another robbery planned for them. During a visit to his father Stephen in prison, Doug reveals his plans to leave Boston and go to Florida. The gang's next robbery in the North End goes awry, and the gang barely escapes. The gang is interrogated by Frawley, but he fails to get any confessions and is forced to release them. During the interrogation, Doug lets slip the barbeque the FBI surveilled them at was an act to bait them; the crew already knew they were under FBI surveillance by the type of antenna mounted on the rear windshield of unmarked police vehicles used for police radios. (FBI uses a matte black antenna; Massachusetts State Police uses a pig-tail style; Boston Police uses either style. FBI would be the logical choice since they have legal jurisdiction on bank robberies.) Doug asks Claire if she will go away with him, and she agrees. When Frawley learns that Claire quit her job, he wiretaps her phone, and threatens to prosecute her as an accomplice after realizing that she is seeing Doug. Shocked to discover that her lover was one of her assailants, she is forced to cooperate with the FBI and breaks up with Doug. Meanwhile, Fergie and Jem are pressuring Doug about the next heist, but Doug is determined to get out. Fergie threatens to kill Claire if Doug does not go through with the job, and reveals to Doug how he controlled his father by making his mother an addict, which led to her suicide. Doug gives in but swears that he will kill Fergie if anything happens to Claire.

At Fenway Park, Doug and Jem enter disguised as Boston police officers, steal $3,500,000 in gate cash, and prepare to escape in an ambulance, disguised as paramedics. Krista, Doug's ex-girlfriend and Jem's sister, threatened by Frawley and heartbroken by Doug's going away without her, reveals enough for the FBI to surround Fenway before the gang can get out. The gang is caught in a firefight with FBI SWAT operators, and Dez and Gloansy are killed. Frawley spots Jem and they exchange gunfire. Jem, determined not to go back to prison and out of ammunition, commits suicide by cop by running out of cover with his guns unloaded and is killed. Knowing that Claire is in danger and that he will never escape as long as Fergie is alive, Doug murders Fergie and his bodyguard and calls Claire. Watching from across the street via binoculars, Doug sees that the FBI are with her as she tells him to come over. He at first thinks she means to betray him, but eventually she gives him a clue to warn him away, which he picks up on. Doug flees instead, donning an MBTA uniform and escaping on a train. Frawley deduces Claire tipped off Doug, but doesn't arrest her because her choice of words is circumstantial. Doug leaves a note under the police radio antenna on Frawley's car, reading "GO F*CK YOURSELF". Frawley doesn't disclose this to his superiors as he would have to admit, despite Doug already telling him, his unmarked car and the undercover police radio antenna alerted Doug the area was under FBI surveillance. Claire's lawyer advises her it was a good move; she didn't betray Doug, yet can't be charged since she cooperated with the FBI. Townies naturally deduce and punish anyone who snitches robbery crews out to law enforcement for apprehension - either by being a witness or for leniency for being arrested for a crime of their own. Later, while gardening, Claire finds a buried bag containing the stolen money, a tangerine, and a note from Doug, suggesting that she can make better use of the money than he can, and that they might see each other again. Claire donates the money, in memory of Doug's mother, to refurbish the local ice hockey arena where Doug once played. From the deck of a small house, Doug looks out over the water, forlorn, but seemingly safe in Florida.

Cast

Production

Pre-production

In 2006, director Adrian Lyne brought Chuck Hogan's novel Prince of Thieves to producer Graham King. King in turn showed it to Warner Bros. studio, who agreed to make an adaptation directed by Lyne and written by Sheldon Turner.[6] Given screenwriting attempts by Turner, Hogan himself and screenwriter Peter Craig did not manage to build a script that fit Warner's requirement for a standard two-hour length movie with a $37 million budget.[7] By 2008, The Town was decided as the title and Ben Affleck, fresh off his directorial debut in Gone Baby Gone, was brought in to serve as star, director and co-writer.[8] Affleck wanted to direct a movie "I personally researched and understood", inviting high school classmate Aaron Stockard to work with him on the script, and travelling to Boston to research on the subject. While Affleck had grown up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he barely heard of Charlestown before joining the project. Affleck and Stockard conducted many interviews with the Charlestown community, as well as the FBI Violent Crimes Task Force in Boston.[7] Later the film's actors also researched within the community to make for more believable characters and performances. Charlestown locals also joined the cast, mostly as extras.[9]

Filming

MelroseMASSBANK
The exterior of a former MassBank branch in Melrose, Massachusetts, was used for the main robbery of the film.

Filming began in late August 2009 in Boston.[10][11] The former MASSBank branch located in Melrose, Massachusetts, was used as the location for the first robbery of the film, taking on the name Cambridge Merchants Bank[12] (the exterior shots, however, are of Cambridge Savings Bank in Harvard Square). Filming also took place at Mohegan Sun in Uncasville, Connecticut, for casino scenes,[13] Massachusetts Correctional Institution – Cedar Junction in Walpole, Massachusetts, for use of their visiting room, and at Anderson Regional Transportation Center in Woburn, Massachusetts, for the ending Amtrak scenes.

Release

The Town was shown at the Venice Film Festival and premiered at Boston's Fenway Park. The film was released in the United States on September 17, 2010.

Box office

The film took #1 at the box office during its opening weekend, taking in $23.8 million.[14] The Town grossed $92.1 million in the United States and Canada with an additional $61.8 million in other territories for a total of $154 million worldwide on a production budget of $37 million.[15][3]

Home media

The film was released on Blu-ray Disc and DVD on December 17, 2010. Both versions include special features and an audio commentary including a look at Affleck as a director and actor. The extended/unrated version is a Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy bundle which includes 28 minutes of additional footage, taking the runtime to over 153 minutes.[16]

On March 6, 2011, the three-disc The Town: Ultimate Collector's Edition DVD/Blu-ray set was released. This set includes the previously released theatrical and extended cut Blu-ray disc as well as a second Blu-ray disc and a DVD which feature a new extended cut with an alternate, darker ending.[17]

2012 re-release

On February 5, 2012, to promote the upcoming The Town: Ultimate Collector's Edition set, the AMC Loews Boston Common theater hosted an "exclusive engagement" of The Town (Take 2), wherein three showings of the film were shown with the alternate ending featured in the new home media release. Immediately preceding each screening, a vice president from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment thanked all those in attendance, including Titus Welliver (Dino Ciampa), Dennis McLaughlin (Rusty), and Affleck's mother, for coming out and supporting director Affleck's "preferred" version of the film, leading to a short, prerecorded introduction by Affleck himself. Earlier that day, the intersection of Tremont and Avery streets was temporarily renamed "The Town Take 2 Place" in a small ceremony, attended by Welliver and Boston city officials.[18]

Reception

Critical response

On review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 93% based on 222 reviews, with an average rating of 7.7/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Tense, smartly written, and wonderfully cast, The Town proves that Ben Affleck has rediscovered his muse -- and that he's a director to be reckoned with."[19] Metacritic gives the film a weighted average score of 74 out of 100, based on 42 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[20] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B+" on an A+ to F scale.[21]

Roger Ebert gave the film 3 out of 4 stars, praising Renner's performance and Affleck's direction.[22] In his review for The New York Times, A. O. Scott commented on the opening heist, "That sequence, like most of the other action set pieces in the film, is lean, brutal and efficient, and evidence of Mr. Affleck's skill and self-confidence as a director."[23] Xan Brooks, in The Guardian, wrote that the action sequences were "sharply orchestrated" but added "it's a bogus, bull-headed enterprise all the same; a film that leaves no cliche untrampled."[24] Justin Chang wrote in Variety that the action scenes strike "an ideal balance between kineticism and clarity" aided by cinematographer Robert Elswit and film editor Dylan Tichenor.[25] Richard Roeper of the Chicago Sun Times gave the film an A+, noting that he found the film incredibly similar to Michael Mann's Heat, which he described as "one of [his] favorite movies of all time."[26] The reviewers at Spill.com also praised one of the shootout scenes, saying "It is surely the best shootout scene we have seen in decades."[27] Writing in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Laremy Lengel titled his review "The Town Works Best if You Avoid the Heat," also referencing Mann's film.[28]

As a Boston-based crime drama, the film forms part of a "crime-movie subgenre" typically marked by "flavorsome accents, pungent atmosphere and fatalistic undertow", according to Chang. Within that subgenre, which includes The Boondock Saints, The Departed, Mystic River and Affleck's Gone Baby Gone, The Town is more of a straightforward crime-procedural and has a more optimistic outlook.[25]

Accolades

Award Category Subject Result
National Board of Review Top Ten Films Won
Best Acting by an Ensemble Cast Won
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award Best Film Nominated
Best Cast Nominated
Best Screenplay Ben Affleck, Peter Craig and Aaron Stockard Nominated
Best Action Film Nominated
Best Supporting Actor Jeremy Renner Nominated
Academy Award Best Supporting Actor Nominated
Golden Globe Award Best Supporting Actor Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award Best Supporting Actor Nominated
Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Best Supporting Actor Nominated
National Society of Film Critics Best Supporting Actor Nominated
St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Best Supporting Actor Nominated
San Diego Film Critics Society Best Supporting Actor Nominated
Best Supporting Actress Blake Lively Nominated
Satellite Award Best Supporting Actor Jeremy Renner Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay Peter Craig Nominated
Aaron Stockard Nominated
Ben Affleck Nominated
Best Director Nominated
Best Editing Dylan Tichenor Nominated
Producers Guild of America Best Film Nominated
BAFTA Award Best Supporting Actor Pete Postlethwaite (posthumous) Nominated

Factual accuracy

A voice in the trailer of the film says: "There are over 300 bank robberies in Boston every year. Most of these professionals live in a 1-square-mile neighborhood called Charlestown." In fact, there were 23 reported bank robberies in the entire state of Massachusetts in the first quarter of 2010, compared with 49 in Illinois and 136 in California, according to the FBI.[29]

The film itself, however, only states that "One blue-collar Boston neighborhood has produced more bank robbers and armored car thieves than anywhere in the world." It then quotes an unnamed Boston Robbery Task Force Federal Agent as saying, "Bank robbery became like a trade in Charlestown, passed down from father to son." During the film, Agent Frawley tells Claire something along these lines, and says that when the BPD gets a call about an armored car robbery it has become standard procedure to close the Charlestown Bridge.

The film ends with a written disclaimer: "Charlestown's reputation as a breeding ground for armed robbers is authentic. However, this film all but ignores the great majority of the residents of Charlestown, past and present, who are the same good and true people found most anywhere,"[30] to whom the film is dedicated.

According to a September 2010 article in The Boston Globe, Charlestown was once known as an area where bank robbers were concentrated, but has not been since the mid-1990s, and the subject has been a sore point for "Townies". Now much of the neighborhood has been gentrified. The paper reported there is some sense of rivalry between Townies, people who lived in the historically Irish-Catholic neighborhood for decades, and "Toonies", largely white-collar workers who arrived with gentrification, but most of that has died down.[29][31] The film makes reference to the definition of "Toonies" during one of Doug and Claire's dates.

In the early 1990s, an increase in the number of bank and armored car robberies by Townies focused attention on Charlestown. In one heist in Hudson, New Hampshire, two guards were killed, and is alluded to in the film - during a scene where Agent Frawley is briefing his task force, he mentions that Doug's father is serving life for a notorious robbery in Nashua. According to Frawley, the elder MacRay hijacked a "bread truck" (armored car) up to New Hampshire, and when one of the guards saw his face, he executed both of them with their own weapons. Frawley notes that this incident led to the passing of regulations prohibiting the driver from leaving the cab even if his partner is being held at gunpoint. Charles Hogan got the idea for his novel, on which the film is based, in 1995. "It was just so remarkable that this one very small community was the focus for bank robbers," he said, but he was very aware that crime was only one part of the community, and he did not want to make all residents of the neighborhood look like criminals.[32] At the film's premiere, Affleck made a similar statement: "Charlestown isn't full of bank robbers and Dorchester isn't full of bad guys and Southie isn't full of math geniuses or bad people."[33]

Retired professional hockey player Jack O'Callahan, a Charlestown native born in 1957, said there was an element of crime in Charlestown when he grew up there, "But it didn't bleed into the neighborhood. And those guys were pretty good parents who went to church on Sundays. They were gangsters, but they were good neighbors."[29]

References

  1. ^ "THE TOWN (15)". Warner Bros. British Board of Film Classification. August 13, 2010. Retrieved September 7, 2013.
  2. ^ "The Town (2010) - Box Office Mojo".
  3. ^ a b "The Town (2010)".. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 4, 2014.
  4. ^ Miller, Neil (August 27, 2006). "Blake Lively Goes to 'Town' for Ben Affleck". Film School Rejects. Archived from the original on September 4, 2009. Retrieved September 5, 2006.
  5. ^ Kit, Borys (August 26, 2009). "Blake Lively going to 'Town' for WB, Legendary". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 16, 2009.
  6. ^ "Lyne recruited to mastermind WB's 'Thieves". Archived from the original on August 14, 2006. Retrieved July 26, 2013.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link), The Hollywood Reporter, August 14, 2006
  7. ^ a b "Anatomy of a Contender: Making of 'The Town'". The Hollywood Reporter. November 17, 2010. Retrieved July 31, 2013.
  8. ^ Ben Affleck moves Variety
  9. ^ "The Real People of the Town," The Down DVD
  10. ^ Gayle, Fee; Raposa, Laura (September 1, 2009). "Ben Affleck, Blake Lively are the talk of 'The Town'". Boston Herald. Retrieved September 5, 2009.
  11. ^ "Blake Gets a Baby Welcome to Ben's Town". Boston Herald. September 1, 2009. Retrieved September 5, 2009.
  12. ^ DeMaina, Daniel (October 9, 2009). "Melrose: 'Lights, cameras, action' in city as Ben Affleck movie shoots locally this month". Melrose Free Press. GateHouse Media. Archived from the original on January 31, 2012. Retrieved October 10, 2009.
  13. ^ News Delta Films, November 9, 2010
  14. ^ "'The Town' takes box office win with $23.8M". Associated Press. September 20, 2010. Retrieved September 20, 2010.
  15. ^ Fritz, Ben (September 16, 2010). "Movie projector: 'Easy A' expected to lead 'The Town,' 'Devil,' 'Alpha and Omega'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 16, 2010.
  16. ^ "The Town (US - DVD R1 BD) in News". Film. Retrieved November 26, 2010.
  17. ^ Foster, Tyler (March 10, 2012). "The Town - Ultimate Collector's Edition (Blu-ray)". DVDtalk. Retrieved June 24, 2013.
  18. ^ "'Town' meeting in Hub as Affleck unveils 'Take 2'". Boston Herald. Archived from the original on February 9, 2012. Retrieved February 5, 2012.
  19. ^ "The Town (2010)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  20. ^ "The Town reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  21. ^ "CinemaScore". cinemascore.com. Archived from the original on April 5, 2015.
  22. ^ Ebert, Roger (September 15, 2010). "The Town Review". Chicago Sun-Times.
  23. ^ Scott, A.O. Bunker Hill to Fenway: A Crook's Freedom Trail. The New York Times, September 17, 2010
  24. ^ Brooks, Xan. The Town Film Review. The Guardian, September 9, 2010. Retrieved September 18, 2010.
  25. ^ a b Chang, Justin. The Town Review. Variety September 9, 2010. Retrieved September 18, 2010.
  26. ^ Roeper, Richard (September 26, 2010). "The Town Review". Chicago Sun-Times.
  27. ^ "The Town Movie Review from". Spill. Retrieved July 31, 2013.
  28. ^ Lengel, Laremy. "The Town Works Best if You Avoid the Heat". Seattle Post Intelligencer, September 17, 2010.
  29. ^ a b c Baker, Billy (September 18, 2010). "Robbed of its new image? Charlestown hopes not Affleck's new film is the talk of the Townies". The Boston Globe. Retrieved September 18, 2010.
  30. ^ Review: The Town. NewCityFilm. Retrieved 3 February 2011
  31. ^ Baker, Billy (September 18, 2010). "Robbed of its new image? Charlestown hopes not". The Boston Globe. Retrieved July 31, 2013.
  32. ^ Woodman, Tenley, "Author Hogan talks about his kind of ‘Town’" Archived June 13, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Boston Herald September 16, 2010. Retrieved September 18, 2010
  33. ^ Fee, Gayle Fee & Raposa, Laura. "Stars go to ‘Town’ for premiere!" Archived September 17, 2010, at the Wayback Machine, "Inside Track" September 15, 2010. Retrieved September 18, 2010.

External links

List of The Daily Show episodes (2010)

This is a list of episodes for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart in 2010.

List of baseball parks used in film and television

List of baseball parks probably used in film and television includes baseball parks that may have been used as settings in filmmaking and television productions. Footage of actual sports events is most likely not included unless it was potentially used as stock footage or otherwise woven into a fictional storyline of a film or TV show. References are typically within the individual articles. This is not necessarily an exhaustive list.

Anaheim Stadium, Anaheim, CaliforniaAngels in the Outfield, 1994 film (exterior and sky shots)

Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo, 1999 filmAstrodome, HoustonBrewster McCloud, 1970 film (many scenes)

The Bad News Bears in Breaking Training, 1977 film (many scenes)

Murder at the World Series, 1977 made-for-TV film (several scenes)

Night Game, 1989 film (many scenes)Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium, AtlantaThe Slugger's Wife, 1985 film (many scenes)Bosse Field, Evansville, IndianaA League of Their Own, 1992 (secondary setting, as home of the Racine Belles)Bush Stadium, Indianapolis, IndianaEight Men Out, 1988 film (standing in for both Comiskey Park and Redland Field)Candlestick Park, San Francisco, CaliforniaExperiment in Terror, 1962 film (closing scenes)

The Fan, 1996 film (many scenes)Citi Field, Queens, New YorkSharknado 2: The Second One, 2014 film

Avengers: Endgame, 2019 film

Yesterday, 2019 film

Cleveland Stadium, Cleveland, OhioMajor League, 1989 film (primary setting, but only a few scenes were actually shot there)College Park, Charleston, South CarolinaMajor League: Back to the Minors, 1998 film (primary setting)Comiskey Park, ChicagoThe Pride of the Yankees, 1942 film (some scenes)

The Stratton Story, 1949 film (many scenes)

Only the Lonely, 1991 film (one scene)Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles, California

Mr. Ed episode, "Leo Durocher Meets Mr. Ed", first aired Sep 29, 1963

Hickey & Boggs, 1972 film (a few scenes)

Better Off Dead, 1985 film (closing scenes)

The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad!, 1988 film (closing scenes)

The Sandlot, 1993 film (cameo)

The Fast and the Furious, 2001 film (opening scene driving in the parking lot)

Clubhouse, 2004 TV series (standing in for a fictional New York stadium)

Superman Returns 2006 film (one scene, with CGI alterations)

Transformers, 2007 film (one scene)Doubleday Field, Cooperstown, New YorkA League of Their Own, 1992 film (closing scenes)Durham Athletic Park, Durham, North CarolinaBull Durham, 1988 film (many scenes)Ebbets Field, Brooklyn, New YorkRoogie's Bump , Ernie Shore Field, Winston-Salem, North CarolinaMr. Destiny, 1990 (several scenes)

Fenway Park, Boston, MassachusettsField of Dreams, 1989 film (cameo)

Fever Pitch, 2005 film

The Town, 2010 film (lengthy scene depicting a robbery)

"Moneyball (film), 2011 film (one scene)

"Ted (film), 2012 film (one scene)

"Patriots Day (film), 2016 film (one scene)Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaAngels in the Outfield, 1951 filmGilmore Field, Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Stratton Story, 1949 filmGrayson Stadium, Savannah, GeorgiaThe Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings, 1976 film (some scenes)Griffith Stadium, Washington, D.C.Damn Yankees, 1958 film (crowd scenes)John O'Donnell Stadium, Davenport, IowaSugar, 2008 film (many scenes)League Stadium, Huntingburg, IndianaA League of Their Own, 1992 (primary setting, as home of the Rockford Peaches)

Soul of the Game, 1996 film (primary baseball setting)Luther Williams Field, Macon, GeorgiaThe Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings, 1976 film (many scenes)

Memorial Stadium, Baltimore, MarylandTin Men, 1987 film (exteriors, background)

Homicide: Life on the Street, 1993–99 TV series (occasional scenes)

Major League II, 1994 film (some scenes)Metrodome, Minneapolis, MinnesotaLittle Big League, 1994 film (primary setting)

Major League: Back to the Minors, 1998 film (secondary setting)Miller Park, Milwaukee, WisconsinMr. 3000, 2004 film (several scenes)Milwaukee County Stadium, Milwaukee, WisconsinMajor League, 1989 film (standing in for the primary setting of Cleveland Stadium)Minute Maid Park, Houston, TexasBoyhood, 2014 film (one scene)Nationals Park, Washington, District of ColumbiaHow Do You Know, 2010 film (one scene)Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, CaliforniaAngels in the Outfield, 1994 film (primary setting)

"Moneyball (film), 2011 film (primary scene)

Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Baltimore, MarylandDave, 1993 film (cameo)

Homicide: Life on the Street, 1993–99 TV series (occasional scenes)

Major League II, 1994 film (primary setting)PNC Park, Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaChasing 3000, 2008 film

Abduction, 2011 filmRangers Ballpark in Arlington, Arlington, TexasThe Rookie, 2002 film (primary setting)Safeco Field, SeattleLife, or Something Like It, 2002 film (some scenes)

Shea Stadium, Queens, New YorkThe Odd Couple, 1968 (cameo)

Bang the Drum Slowly, 1973 film (many scenes)

The Wiz, 1978 film (flying monkeys chase)

Seven Minutes in Heaven (film), 1985 film (one scene)

Seinfeld, TV series, 1992 episode "The Boyfriend" (cameo)

Men in Black, 1997 film (one scene)

Two Weeks Notice, 2002 film (one scene)Sportsman's Park, St. Louis, MissouriThe Pride of St. Louis, 1952 film

The Winning Team, another 1952 film

The Pride of the Yankees, 1942 film (cameo)

Tiger Stadium, Detroit, MichiganThe Pride of the Yankees, 1942 film (some scenes)

One in a Million: The Ron LeFlore Story, 1978, made-for-TV film (many scenes)

Tiger Town, 1983, made-for-TV film (many scenes)

61*, 2001, made-for-TV film (primary setting and Tiger Stadium)

Hardball, 2001, (one scene as 'Chicago Field')

Hung, 2009, pilot episode of HBO TV show

Kill the Irishman, 2011Turner Field, Atlanta, GeorgiaThe Change-Up, 2011 film

Trouble with the Curve, 2012 film

Flight, 2012 filmU. S. Cellular Field, ChicagoRookie of the Year, 1993 film (some scenes)

Little Big League, 1994 film (all games played by the featured Minnesota Twins on the road)

Major League II, 1994 film (some scenes)

My Best Friend's Wedding, 1997 film (cameo)War Memorial Stadium, Buffalo, New YorkThe Natural, 1984 film

Wrigley Field, ChicagoWrigley scenes in 1984 film The Natural were actually filmed at All-High Stadium in Buffalo, New York

The Blues Brothers, 1980 film (cameo)

Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986 film (one scene)

About Last Night..., 1986 film (one scene)

The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad!, 1988 film (cameo)

A League of Their Own, 1992 film (early scenes, as fictional Harvey Field)

Rookie of the Year, 1993 film (primary setting)

I Want Someone to Eat Cheese With, 2006 filmWrigley Field, Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Stratton Story, 1949 film (a few scenes)

Angels in the Outfield, 1951 film (a few scenes)

The Kid from Left Field, 1953 film (many scenes)

Damn Yankees, 1958 film (primary setting – standing in for Griffith Stadium)

The Geisha Boy, 1948 film

Home Run Derby, 1959 TV series

The Twilight Zone, 1960 episode "The Mighty Casey"

Yankee Stadium I, Bronx, New YorkThe Pride of the Yankees, 1942 film (many scenes)

Woman of the Year, 1942 film (one scene)

Angels in the Outfield, 1951 film (setting for cameo by Joe DiMaggio)The FBI Story (1959)(Interior and exterior shots seen while FBI agents are keeping communist suspect under surveillance.)

West Side Story, 1961 film (cameo – overhead shot during opening credits)

Bang the Drum Slowly, 1973 film (several scenes standing in for Shea Stadium)

Seinfeld, TV series, cameos in various episodes 1994–98 starting with "The Opposite" (George Costanza's workplace)

For Love of the Game, 1999 film (many scenes)

Anger Management, 2003 film (closing scene)Yankee Stadium II, Bronx, New YorkThe Adjustment Bureau, 2011 film (one scene)Zephyr Field, Metairie, LouisianaMr. 3000, 2004 film (several scenes)

The Town (Richter novel)

For the novel of the same name by William Faulkner, see The Town (Faulkner).

For the film of the same name and different source see The Town (2010 film).The Town (1950) is a novel written by American author Conrad Richter. It is the third installment of his trilogy The Awakening Land. The Trees (1940) and The Fields (1946) were the earlier portions of the series. The Town was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1951.

In September 1966, his publisher Alfred A. Knopf reissued the trilogy for the first time as a single hardcover volume. According to the edition notice of this all-in-one version—which lists the original publication dates of the three books -- The Town was first published on 24 April 1950.

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