The Order of the Good Death

The Order of the Good Death is a death acceptance organization founded in 2011 by mortician and author Caitlin Doughty.[1][2][3] The group advocates for natural burial and embracing human mortality.[4]

Along with Doughty, members include Sarah Chavez[5], Director of The Order of the Good Death, Megan Rosenbloom, Director of Death Salon, and Amber Carvaly, Director of Undertaking LA. Other notable members are artist and monument-maker Greg Lundgren, TED speaker Jae Rhim Lee, alternative funeral home director Jeff Jorgenson, artist Landis Blair,[6] and other death professionals, artists and academics.[7][8][9][10][11][12]

The group held its first "death salon" in Los Angeles in 2013.[13][2][14][15][16] Another salon was held in 2014 at St Bartholomew's Hospital Pathology Museum in London by museum curator Carla Valentine.[17]

The group took its name from the Brazilian Order of Our Lady of the Good Death.[18]

Death-positive movement

Death positivity was popularized by Caitlin Doughty as a play on the term sex positivity. The death-positive movement is a social and philosophical movement that encourages people to speak openly about death, dying, and corpses. The movement seeks to eliminate the silence around death-related topics, decrease anxiety surrounding death, and encourages more diversity in end of life care options available to the public.[19]

However, the ideas behind the movement have existed much longer. [20] The Order of the Good Death website lists the beliefs of the death-positive movement as being that cultural censorship of death and dying does more harm than good, that open discussions about death should be accepted as a natural human curiosity, that families should have full rights to care for the bodies of their loved ones without intervention from funeral businesses, and that end of life care should be diversified and performed in ways that cause less damage to the environment than our current practices.[21] The movement also strongly encourages participants to speak to their families about their own end of life wishes, even if they are young and healthy and is critical of the commercialized funeral industry.[22] It also encourages people to express their feelings about death through art.[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ Coye, Dale F. (2014), Seven Sacraments for Everyone, FriesenPress, p. 199, ISBN 9781460231555
  2. ^ a b Kim O'Connor (May 16, 2013), "The Death-Positive Movement", Pacific Standard
  3. ^ Washburn, Michael (March–April 2013), "Decomposure", University of Chicago Magazine
  4. ^ Natural Burial, The Order of the Good Death, retrieved 2017-05-08
  5. ^ http://www.orderofthegooddeath.com/members
  6. ^ http://www.orderofthegooddeath.com/members
  7. ^ Gross, Terry (October 8, 2014), A Mortician Talks Openly About Death, And Wants You To, Too [interview transcript], NPR, retrieved October 29, 2014
  8. ^ Kiley, Brendan (September 17, 2014), "It's Time to Think About Your Demise; An Interview with Caitlin Doughty, Author of Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and Doyenne of Death", The Stranger, retrieved September 18, 2014
  9. ^ Kiley, Brendan (September 17, 2014), "Enough Talk About Your Youth—Let's Talk About Your Death: Seattle Is at the Forefront of Innovative Thinking About What to Do with Dead Bodies", The Stranger
  10. ^ Damon Sayles, ed. (December 16, 2014), "Hot topics: Hey funeral directors, move out of the way!", Funeral Home and Cemetery Executive Briefing, retrieved 2014-12-26
  11. ^ Members: Death Professionals, The Order of the Good Death, retrieved 2014-12-26
  12. ^ Natalie Pompilio (November 16, 2013), The Order of the Good Death, Legacy.com
  13. ^ Hayasaki, Erika (October 25, 2013), "Death Is Having a Moment—Fueled by social networking, the growing "death movement" is a reaction against the sanitization of death that has persisted in American culture since the 1800s"", The Atlantic
  14. ^ Courtland, Emma (May 14, 2014), "Caitlin Doughty: The Millennial's Mortician", LA Weekly
  15. ^ Carolyn Kellogg (October 19, 2013), "It's not too late to get to the Death Salon", The Los Angeles Times
  16. ^ Death Salon, The Order of the Good Death, retrieved 2014-12-27
  17. ^ Adam Sherwin (April 11, 2014), "To die for: Death Salon mortality conference - the event meant to help you go out with a bang", The Independent
  18. ^ About us, The Order of the Good Death, retrieved 2014-12-27, The Order was inspired by several historical concepts of the good death, including the medieval Ars Moriendi (Art of Dying) and the Tibetan Bardo Thodol. The name itself is taken from the 19th century Brazilian sisterhood of African slaves, Irmandade da Nossa Senhora da Boa Morte, or, Sisterhood of Our Lady of the Good Death.
  19. ^ "What is the Death Positive Movement?". TalkDeath. 2015-06-09. Retrieved 2018-03-24.
  20. ^ "Death Positive Movement - The Order of the Good Death". The Order of the Good Death. Retrieved 2018-03-24.
  21. ^ "Death Positive". The Order of the Good Death.
  22. ^ Kelly, Kim (2017-10-27). "Welcome the reaper: Caitlin Doughty and the 'death-positivity' movement". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018-03-24.
  23. ^ "5 Stunning Pieces Of Art That Prove Death Doesn't Have To Be Sad". Women's Health. 2018-02-08. Retrieved 2018-03-24.

External links

Algor mortis

Algor mortis (Latin: algor—coldness; mortis—of death), the second stage of death, is the change in body temperature post mortem, until the ambient temperature is matched. This is generally a steady decline, although if the ambient temperature is above the body temperature (such as in a hot desert), the change in temperature will be positive, as the (relatively) cooler body acclimates to the warmer environment. External factors can have a significant influence.

The term was first used by Dowler in 1849. The first published measurements of the intervals of temperature after death were done by Dr John Davey in 1839.

Caitlin Doughty

Caitlin Doughty (born August 19, 1984) is an American mortician, author, blogger, and YouTube personality known for advocating death acceptance and the reform of Western funeral industry practices. She is the creator of the Web series "Ask a Mortician", founder of The Order of the Good Death, and author of two bestselling books, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory in 2014, and From Here to Eternity; Traveling the World to Find the Good Death in 2017, both published by W.W. Norton and Company.

Cypress College

Cypress College is a comprehensive community college located in Cypress, in southern California, United States. The college is one of 112 in the California Community Colleges System and belongs to the North Orange County Community College District. It offers a variety of general education (55 associate degrees), transfer courses (58 transfer majors), and 145 vocational programs leading to associate degrees and certificates.

Dead on arrival

Dead on arrival (DOA), also dead in the field and brought in dead (BID), indicates that a patient was found to be already clinically dead upon the arrival of professional medical assistance, often in the form of first responders such as emergency medical technicians, paramedics, or police.

In some jurisdictions, first responders must consult verbally with a physician before officially pronouncing a patient deceased, but once cardiopulmonary resuscitation is initiated, it must be continued until a physician can pronounce the patient dead.

Death messenger

Death messengers, in former times, were those who were dispatched to spread the news that an inhabitant of their city or village had died. They were to wear unadorned black and go door to door with the message, "You are asked to attend the funeral of the departed __________ at (time, date, and place)." This was all they were allowed to say, and were to move on to the next house immediately after uttering the announcement. This tradition persisted in some areas to as late as the mid-19th century.

Death rattle

Terminal respiratory secretions (or simply terminal secretions), known colloquially as a death rattle, are sounds often produced by someone who is near death as a result of fluids such as saliva and bronchial secretions accumulating in the throat and upper chest. Those who are dying may lose their ability to swallow and may have increased production of bronchial secretions, resulting in such an accumulation. Usually, two or three days earlier, the symptoms of approaching death can be observed as saliva accumulates in the throat, making it very difficult to take even a spoonful of water. Related symptoms can include shortness of breath and rapid chest movement. While death rattle is a strong indication that someone is near death, it can also be produced by other problems that cause interference with the swallowing reflex, such as brain injuries.It is sometimes misinterpreted as the sound of the person choking to death, or alternatively, that they are gargling.

Dignified death

Dignified death is a somewhat elusive concept often related to suicide. One factor that has been cited as a core component of dignified death is maintaining a sense of control. Another view is that a truly dignified death is an extension of a dignified life. There is some concern that assisted suicide does not guarantee a dignified death, since some patients may experience complications such as nausea and vomiting. There is some concern that age discrimination denies the elderly a dignified death.

Fan death

Fan death is a well-known superstition in Korean culture, where it is thought that running an electric fan in a closed room with unopened or no windows will prove fatal. Despite no concrete evidence to support the concept, belief in fan death persists to this day in Korea, and also to a lesser extent in Japan.

Funeral director

A funeral director, also known as an undertaker (British English) or mortician (American English), is a professional involved in the business of funeral rites. These tasks often entail the embalming and burial or cremation of the dead, as well as the arrangements for the funeral ceremony (although not the directing and conducting of the funeral itself unless clergy are not present). Funeral directors may at times be asked to perform tasks such as dressing (in garments usually suitable for daily wear), casketing (placing the human body in the coffin), and cossetting (applying any sort of cosmetic or substance to the best viewable areas of the corpse for the purpose of enhancing its appearance). A funeral director may work at a funeral home or be an independent employee.

Greg Lundgren

Greg Lundgren is a Seattle-based artist, author, filmmaker and entrepreneur.

Lazarus sign

The Lazarus sign or Lazarus reflex is a reflex movement in brain-dead or brainstem failure patients, which causes them to briefly raise their arms and drop them crossed on their chests (in a position similar to some Egyptian mummies). The phenomenon is named after the Biblical figure Lazarus of Bethany, whom Jesus Christ raised from the dead in the Gospel of John.

Megadeath

Megadeath (or megacorpse) is one million human deaths, usually caused by a nuclear explosion. The term was used by scientists and thinkers who strategized likely outcomes of all-out nuclear warfare.

Morgue

A morgue or mortuary (in a hospital or elsewhere) is used for the storage of human corpses awaiting identification or removal for autopsy or respectful burial, cremation or other method. In modern times corpses have customarily been refrigerated to delay decomposition.

Necronym

A necronym (from the Greek words νεκρός, nekros, "dead" and ὄνομα ónoma, "name") is a reference to, or name of, a person who has died. Many cultures have taboos and traditions associated with referring to such a person. These vary from the extreme of never again speaking the person's real name, often using some circumlocution instead, to the opposite extreme of commemorating it incessantly by naming other things or people after the deceased.

For instance, in some cultures it is common for a newborn child to receive the name (a necronym) of a relative who has recently died, while in others to reuse such a name would be considered extremely inappropriate or even forbidden. While this varies from culture to culture, the use of necronyms is quite common.

Necrophobia

Necrophobia is a specific phobia which is the irrational fear of dead things (e.g., corpses) as well as things associated with death (e.g., coffins, tombstones, funerals, cemeteries). With all types of emotions, obsession with death becomes evident in both fascination and objectification. In a cultural sense, necrophobia may also be used to mean a fear of the dead by a cultural group, e.g., a belief that the spirits of the dead will return to haunt the living.Symptoms include: shortness of breath, rapid breathing, irregular heartbeat, sweating, dry mouth and shaking, feeling sick and uneasy, psychological instability, and an altogether feeling of dread and trepidation. The sufferer may feel this phobia all the time. The sufferer may also experience this sensation when something triggers the fear, like a close encounter with a dead animal or the funeral of a loved one or friend. The fear may have developed when a person witnessed a death, or was forced to attend a funeral as a child. Some people experience this after viewing frightening media.The fear can manifest itself as a serious condition. Treatment options include medication and therapy.The word necrophobia is derived from the Greek nekros (νεκρός) for "corpse" and the Greek phobos (φόβος) for "fear".

Obituary

An obituary (obit for short) is a news article that reports the recent death of a person, typically along with an account of the person's life and information about the upcoming funeral. In large cities and larger newspapers, obituaries are written only for people considered significant. In local newspapers, an obituary may be published for any local resident upon death. A necrology is a register or list of records of the deaths of people related to a particular organization, group or field, which may only contain the sparsest details, or small obituaries. Historical necrologies can be important sources of information.

Two types of paid advertisements are related to obituaries. One, known as a death notice, omits most biographical details and may be a legally required public notice under some circumstances. The other type, a paid memorial advertisement, is usually written by family members or friends, perhaps with assistance from a funeral home. Both types of paid advertisements are usually run as classified advertisements.

Pallor mortis

Pallor mortis (Latin: pallor "paleness", mortis "of death"), the first stage of death, is an after-death paleness that occurs in those with light/white skin.

Post-mortem interval

Post-mortem interval (PMI) is the time that has elapsed since a person has died. If the time in question is not known, a number of medical/scientific techniques are used to determine it. This also can refer to the stage of decomposition of the body.

Rigor mortis

Rigor mortis (Latin: rigor "stiffness", mortis "of death"), or postmortem rigidity, is the third stage of death. It is one of the recognizable signs of death, characterized by stiffening of the limbs of the corpse caused by chemical changes in the muscles postmortem. In humans, rigor mortis can occur as soon as four hours after death.

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