The New York Times Company

The New York Times Company is an American mass media company which publishes its namesake newspaper, The New York Times. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. has served as chairman since 1997.[5][6] It is headquartered in Manhattan, New York.[7]

Coordinates: 40°45′22″N 73°59′25″W / 40.75611°N 73.99028°W

The New York Times Company
Public company
Traded asClass A Common Stock: NYSENYT
S&P MidCap 400 Index component
Class B Common Stock: unlisted
IndustryNewspapers
FoundedSeptember 18, 1851
FoundersHenry Jarvis Raymond
George Jones
Headquarters,
United States
Key people
Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr.
(Chairman)
Mark Thompson
(President and CEO)
ProductsThe New York Times
International New York Times
Other media properties
RevenueIncrease US$1.676 billion (2017)
Increase US$112.366 million (2017)
Decrease US$4.296 million (2017)
Total assetsDecrease US$ 2.100 billion (2017)
Total equityIncrease US$897.279 million (2017)
OwnerSulzberger family (13%)

Carlos Slim (17%)
Number of employees
3,700 (December 2017)
Websitewww.nytco.com
Footnotes / references
[1][2][3][4]

History

The company was founded by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones in New York City. The first edition of the newspaper The New York Times, published on September 18, 1851, stated: "We publish today the first issue of the New-York Daily Times, and we intend to issue it every morning (Sundays excepted) for infinite years to come."[8]

The company moved into the cable channel industry purchasing a 40% interest in the Popcorn Channel, a theatrical movie preview and local movie times, in November 1994.[9]

The company completed its purchase of The Washington Post's 50 percent interest in the International Herald Tribune (IHT) for US$65 million on January 1, 2003, becoming the sole owner.[10]

On March 18, 2005, the company acquired About.com, an online provider of consumer information for US$410 million.[11] In 2005, the company reported revenues of US$3.4 billion to its investors.

The Times, on August 25, 2006, acquired Baseline StudioSystems, an online database and research service on the film and television industries for US$35 million.[12]

The company announced on September 12, 2006, its decision to sell its Broadcast Media Group, consisting of "nine network-affiliated television stations, their related Web sites and the digital operating center".[13] The New York Times reported on January 4, 2007, that the company had reached an agreement to sell all nine local television stations to the private equity firm Oak Hill Capital Partners, which then created a holding company for the stations, Local TV LLC.[14][15] The company announced that it had finalized the sale of its Broadcast Media Group on May 7, 2007, for "approximately $575 million".[15]

The company moved from 229 West 43rd Street to The New York Times Building at 620 Eighth Avenue, on the west side of Times Square, between 40th and 41st streets across from the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey Bus Terminal.[16]

On July 14, 2009, the company announced that WQXR was to be sold to WNYC, which moved the station to 105.9 FM and began to operate the station as non-commercial on October 8, 2009. This US$45 million transaction, which involved Univision Radio's WCAA moving to the 96.3 FM frequency from 105.9 FM, ended the Times' 65-year-long ownership of the station.[17]

In December 2011, the company sold its Regional Media Group to Halifax Media Group, owners of The Daytona Beach News-Journal, for $143 million. The Boston Globe and The Telegram & Gazette of Worcester were not part of the sale.[18] In 2011, the Times sold Baseline StudioSystems back to its original owners, Laurie S. Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein, majority shareholders of Project Hollywood LLC.[12]

Facing falling revenue from print advertising in its flagship publication in 2011, The New York Times, the company introduced a paywall to its website. As of 2012, it has been modestly successful, garnering several hundred thousand subscriptions and about $100 million in annual revenue.[19]

In 2013, the New York Times Company sold The Boston Globe and other New England media properties to John W. Henry, the principal owner of the Boston Red Sox. According to the Times Company, the move was made in order to focus more on its core brands.[20][21]

Radio stations

The paper bought AM radio station WQXR (1560 kHz) in 1944.[22] Its "sister" FM station, WQXQ, would become WQXR-FM (96.3 MHz). Branded as "The Radio Stations of The New York Times", its classical music radio format was simulcast on both the AM & FM frequencies until December 1992, when the big-band and pop standards music format of station WNEW (1130 kHz – now WBBR/"Bloomberg Radio") was transferred to and adopted by WQXR; in recognition of the format change, WQXR changed its call letters to WQEW (a "hybrid" combination of "WQXR" and "WNEW").[23] By 1999, The New York Times was leasing WQEW to ABC Radio for its "Radio Disney" format.[24] In 2007, WQEW was finally purchased by Disney; in late 2014, it was sold to Family Radio (a religious radio network) and became WFME.[25] On July 14, 2009, it was announced that WQXR-FM would be sold to the WNYC radio group who, on October 8, 2009, moved the station from 96.3 to 105.9 MHz (swapping frequencies with Spanish-language station WXNY-FM, which wanted the more powerful transmitter to increase its coverage) and began operating it as a non-commercial, public radio station.[26] After the purchase, WQXR-FM retained the classical music format, whereas WNYC-FM (93.9 MHz) abandoned it, switching to a talk radio format.

Company holdings

Alongside its namesake newspaper, the company also owns the New York Times International Edition and their related digital properties including NYTimes.com, as well as various brand-related properties.[27]

Ownership

Since 1967, the company has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol NYT. Of the two categories of stock, Class A and Class B, the former is publicly traded and the latter is held privately—largely (nearly 90%) by the descendants of Adolph Ochs, who purchased The New York Times newspaper in 1896.

Carlos Slim loan and investment

On January 20, 2009, The New York Times reported that its parent company, The New York Times Company, had reached an agreement to borrow $250 million from Carlos Slim, a Mexican billionaire "to help the newspaper company finance its businesses".[28] The New York Times Company later repaid that loan ahead of schedule.[29] Since then, Slim has bought large quantities of the company's Class A shares, which are available for purchase by the public and offer less control over the company than Class B shares, which are privately held.[29] Slim's investments in the company included large purchases of Class A shares in 2011, when he increased his stake in the company to 8.1% of Class A shares,[30] and again in 2015, when he exercised stock options—acquired as part of a repayment plan on the 2009 loan—to purchase 15.9 million Class A shares, making him the largest shareholder.[29][31] As of March 7, 2016, Slim owned 17.4% of the company's Class A shares, according to annual filings submitted by the company.[32][33][34] While Slim is the largest shareholder in the company, his investment only allows him to vote only for Class A directors, a third of the company's board.[29]

Community awards

Linda Allen and Gigi Lincoln talk to Janet Robinson
2008 I Love My Librarian award recipients Linda Allen and Margaret "Gigi" Lincoln talk with Janet Robinson in The New York Times Building.

The company sponsors a series of national and local awards designed to highlight the achievements of individuals and organizations in different realms.

In 2007, it inaugurated its first Nonprofit Excellence Award, awarded to four organizations "for the excellence of their management practices". Only nonprofits in New York City, Long Island, or Westchester were eligible.[35]

Jointly with the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the American Library Association, The New York Times Company sponsors an award to honor librarians "for service to their communities". The I Love My Librarian! award was given to ten recipients in December 2008, and presented by The New York Times Company president and CEO Janet L. Robinson, Carnegie Corporation president Vartan Gregorian, and Jim Rettig, president of the American Library Association.[36]

In May 2009, the company launched The New York Times Outstanding Playwright Award to honor an American playwright who had recently had his or her professional debut in New York.[37] The first winner was Tarell Alvin McCraney for his play "The Brothers Size".[38] In 2010, Dan LeFranc won for his play "Sixty Miles to Silver Lake".[39]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The New York Times Company 2017 Annual Report (PDF) (Report). The New York Times Company. February 27, 2018.
  2. ^ "Mexican Billionaire Invests in Times Company". The New York Times. January 20, 2009.
  3. ^ "The Sulzberger Dynasty Tightens Its Grip on the New York Times". Fortune. October 19, 2016.
  4. ^ Vinton, Kate (June 1, 2016). "These 15 Billionaires Own America's News Media Companies". Forbes.
  5. ^ "Times Publisher and His Wife Separate". The New York Times. May 10, 2008.
  6. ^ "Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. Biography" Archived December 19, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Contact Us". The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on May 6, 2009. Retrieved August 28, 2009.
  8. ^ "Timeline". The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on September 14, 2008. Retrieved September 29, 2008.
  9. ^ (November 28, 1994). "The New York Times Co. has decided to enter the cable network business by taking a 40% stake in the soon-to-be-launched Popcorn Channel. (Brief Article)." Broadcasting & Cable. NewBay Media LLC. 1994. Retrieved April 27, 2015 from HighBeam Research.
  10. ^ Kirkpatrick, David D. (January 2, 2003). "International Herald Tribune Now Run Solely by The Times". The New York Times. Retrieved August 29, 2008. The International Herald Tribune, descendant of an American paper first published in Paris in 1887, is appearing today for the first time under the sole ownership and management of The New York Times Company. The takeover ends an anomalous 35-year partnership between The Times and its domestic competitor The Washington Post that produced a journalistic hybrid consisting mainly of articles and editorials from both papers compiled by editors in Paris. In October, The Times reached an agreement to buy The Post's 50 percent stake in the venture for about $70 million -- in part, The Post said, by threatening to start a rival paper overseas.
  11. ^ Teather, David (2005-02-17). "New York Times buys About.com". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-01-08.
  12. ^ a b "NY Times Sells TV/Movie Database Baseline". Deadline Hollywood. October 7, 2011.
  13. ^ "The New York Times Company Announces Plan to Sell Its Broadcast Media Group" (Press release). The New York Times Company. September 12, 2006. Retrieved July 23, 2008.
  14. ^ Story, Louise (January 4, 2007). "New York Times to Sell 9 Local TV Stations". The New York Times. Retrieved August 23, 2008.
  15. ^ a b "The New York Times Company Reports April Revenues" (Press release). The New York Times Company. May 17, 2007. Archived from the original on July 22, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2008. On May 7, 2007, the Company sold the Broadcast Media Group, consisting of nine network-affiliated television stations, their related Web sites and the digital operating center, for approximately $575 million.
  16. ^ "The New York Times Company Enters The 21st Century With A New Technologically Advanced And Environmentally Sensitive Headquarters" (PDF) (Press release). The New York Times Company. November 19, 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 24, 2008. Retrieved August 23, 2008.
  17. ^ Bensinger, Greg (July 14, 2009). "New York Times to Get $45 Million for Radio Station". Bloomberg News. Retrieved July 18, 2009.
  18. ^ Staff/wire reports (December 27, 2011). "New York Times agrees to sell regional news group". The Boston Globe. Retrieved December 30, 2011.
  19. ^ Sass, Erik (March 12, 2012). "'NYT' Pay Wall Could Bring $100M Annually". Media Daily News. Retrieved March 13, 2012.
  20. ^ Christine, Haughney (August 3, 2013). "New York Times Company Sells Boston Globe". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  21. ^ "Red Sox Principal Owner to Buy Boston Globe Newspaper". The Wall Street Journal. August 3, 2013. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  22. ^ "New York Times Timeline 1941–1970". The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on September 7, 2008. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  23. ^ Kozinn, Allan (October 21, 1992). "WQXR-AM to Change Its Format, to Popular Music From Classical". The New York Times. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  24. ^ Blumenthal, Ralph (December 2, 1998). "WQEW-AM: All Kids, All the Time". The New York Times. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  25. ^ Family Radio Returns To New York – RadioInsight Archived February 21, 2015, at the Wayback Machine November 21, 2014
  26. ^ Bensinger, Greg (July 14, 2009). "New York Times to Get $45 Million for Radio Station". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on February 16, 2012. Retrieved July 18, 2009.
  27. ^ "Business Units". The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on August 30, 2008. Retrieved August 29, 2008. The New York Times Company, a leading media company with 2007 revenues of $3.2 billion, includes The New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, 16 other daily newspapers, WQXR-FM, and more than 50 Web sites, including NYTimes.com, Boston.com, and About.com. The Company's core purpose is to enhance society by creating, collecting, and distributing high-quality news, information, and entertainment.
  28. ^ Dash, Eric (January 19, 2009). "Mexican Billionaire Invests in Times Company". The New York Times. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d Laya, Patricia; Smith, Gerry (January 14, 2015). "Billionaire Carlos Slim Doubles Holdings in New York Times". Bloomberg News. Retrieved June 20, 2015.
  30. ^ Saba, Jennifer (October 6, 2011). "Carlos Slim increases stake in NY Times". Reuters. Retrieved July 1, 2012."
  31. ^ "Carlos Slim becomes top New York Times shareholder". January 14, 2017 – via Reuters.
  32. ^ "The New York Times Company Notice of 2016 Annual Meeting and Proxy Statement" (PDF). The New York Times Company. March 22, 2016. Retrieved October 28, 2016.
  33. ^ "Annual Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, for The New York Times Company (Form 10-K)". Securities and Exchange Commission. February 24, 2016. Retrieved October 28, 2016., See Item 12, which states, "The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to the sections titled "Principal Holders of Common Stock," "Security Ownership of Management and Directors" and "The 1997 Trust" of our Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.
  34. ^ Stiles, Andrew (27 May 2016). "New York Times Is Very Concerned About Billionaire Media Investors—But Not Their Billionaire Investor". Heatstreet. Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Retrieved 29 May 2016. Slim doubled his stake in the Times to 16.8 percent last year after exercising options tied to a $250 million loan he gave the company that helped it survive the financial downturn in 2009. His current stake in the company is valued at more than $300 million.
  35. ^ "The New York Times Company Announces Four Winners of Its First Nonprofit Excellence Awards" (Press release). The New York Times Company. June 28, 2007. Retrieved December 10, 2008.
  36. ^ "Carnegie Corporation of New York/New York Times I Love My Librarian Award winners announced" (Press release). American Library Association. December 8, 2008. Retrieved February 3, 2009.
  37. ^ Healy, Patrick. "Times's Outstanding Playwright Award Goes to Kristoffer Diaz". ArtsBeat. Retrieved 2017-02-12.
  38. ^ Joseph, Chris (2011-08-31). "Tarell Alvin McCraney Brings His Award-Winning The Brothers Size Home to Miami". Miami New Times. Retrieved 2017-02-12.
  39. ^ "The New York Times Company - Dan LeFranc Wins the 2010 New York Times Outstanding Playwright Award For "Sixty Miles to Silver Lake"". investors.nytco.com. Retrieved 2017-02-12.

External links

Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr.

Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. (born September 22, 1951) is an American journalist. Sulzberger became the publisher of The New York Times in 1992, and chairman of The New York Times Company in 1997, succeeding his father, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger. On December 14, 2017, he announced he would be ceding the post of publisher to his son, Arthur Gregg "A.G." Sulzberger, effective January 1, 2018.

Byron Brown

Byron William Brown II (born September 24, 1958) is the 62nd and current mayor of Buffalo, New York, elected on November 8, 2005 and is the City's first African-American mayor. He previously served Western New York as a member of the New York State Senate and Buffalo Common Council. He was the first African-American politician elected to the New York State Senate to represent a district outside New York City and the first member of any minority race to represent a majority white New York State Senate district.

Brown was born and raised in Queens, New York. He rose to elective office after serving in a variety of political roles. He began his political career performing as an aide to local representatives in several legislative bodies (Buffalo Common Council, Erie County Legislature and New York State Assembly) and later getting involved in a regional political organization. After several roles as a legislative aide, he was appointed to the Erie County cabinet-level Director of Equal Employment Opportunity post.

As both a New York State Senator and Buffalo Mayor, he has been closely involved in the development of the three Seneca Nation casinos that have been planned and built in Western New York since 2002. As someone born and raised downstate who went on to become an upstate political servant, he has been active on the statewide political front. He is a close political ally of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. He has also been active with the National Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition in efforts to prevent gun-related crime. His plan to revitalize Buffalo by demolishing its abundant vacant buildings has drawn opposition from historic preservationists, but he has made the development of the Buffalo waterfront a priority.

Jack Kemp

Jack French Kemp (July 13, 1935 – May 2, 2009) was an American politician and a professional player in both American football and Canadian football. A member of the Republican Party from New York, he served as Housing Secretary in the administration of President George H. W. Bush from 1989 to 1993, having previously served nine terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1971 to 1989. He was the Republican Party's nominee for Vice President in the 1996 election, where he was the running mate of presidential nominee Bob Dole. Kemp had previously contended for the presidential nomination in the 1988 Republican primaries.

Before entering politics, Kemp was a professional quarterback for 13 years. He played briefly in the National Football League (NFL) and the Canadian Football League (CFL), but became a star in the American Football League (AFL). He served as captain of both the San Diego Chargers and Buffalo Bills and earned the AFL Most Valuable Player award in 1965 after leading the Bills to a second consecutive championship. He played in the AFL for all 10 years of its existence, appeared in its All-Star game seven times, played in its championship game five times, and set many of the league's career passing records. Kemp also co-founded the AFL Players Association, for which he served five terms as president. During the early part of his football career, he served in the United States Army Reserve.

As an economic conservative, Kemp advocated low taxes and supply-side policies during his political career. His positions spanned the social spectrum, ranging from his conservative opposition to abortion to his more libertarian stances advocating immigration reform. As a proponent of both Chicago school and supply-side economics, he is notable as an influence upon the Reagan agenda and the architect of the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981, which is known as the Kemp–Roth tax cut.

After his days in political office, Kemp remained active as a political advocate and commentator; he served on corporate and nonprofit organization boards. He also authored, co-authored, and edited several books. He promoted American football and advocated for retired professional football players. Kemp was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009 by President Barack Obama.

List of United States politicians who have acknowledged cannabis use

Cannabis is a plant and, as hemp, a source for fibers, oil, and seed. Prior to its prohibition, U.S. politicians known for growing hemp include some of the nation's Founding Fathers and presidents. Politicians who have admitted to recreational use of the drug during prohibition include mayors, governors, members of the House of Representatives, Senators and presidents.

List of assets owned by The New York Times Company

This is a list of assets owned by The New York Times Company.

List of people banned or suspended by the NBA

Under Article 21 of the National Basketball Association (NBA) Constitution, the NBA commissioner has the power to hand down disciplinary actions (either suspensions or fines less than $60,000) on players for on-court incidents, conduct that does not conform to standards of fair play, conduct that does not comply with federal or state laws, and conduct that is detrimental to the game of basketball or the league. As defined by the 2005 Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) and the NBA, any party (a player, a team, the NBA or the NBPA) can appeal to an arbitrator if a suspension is longer than 12 games or a fine is more than $50,000. If an appeal is filed, the arbitrator would have the power to either uphold or reject the decisions made by the commissioner. If the incident is serious enough, such as point shaving or substance abuse, players can be permanently banned from playing, although players banned for substance abuse are permitted to be reinstated two years later under the anti-drug agreement between the league and the NBPA.In the league's early years, a handful of players were banned permanently because of their involvement with point shaving in college, although Connie Hawkins was able to overturn the ban through litigation. Several more were banned permanently for abusing banned substances and they usually never returned, though some such as Micheal Ray Richardson and Chris Andersen were able to return to play after the ban. Among those suspended, Metta World Peace (then Ron Artest) and Latrell Sprewell faced the most serious punishments for on-court altercations; they were suspended 86 and 68 games, respectively. Gilbert Arenas was also suspended for more than half of a regular season's games for bringing firearms into an arena and drawing them in a dispute with teammate Javaris Crittenton.

The Gadsden Times

The Gadsden Times is a daily newspaper serving Gadsden, Alabama, and the surrounding area in northeastern Alabama.

The Times was owned by Halifax Media Group. Before that, the newspaper was a member of the New York Times Regional Media Group, a subsidiary of the New York Times Company, through the corporate entity of NYT Holdings, Inc., an Alabama corporation. The New York Times Company acquired the Times in 1985 from the Public Welfare Foundation, a charitable entity. The Times had been donated to that foundation by its owner Edward Marsh, along with other newspapers he owned, before his death in 1964.In 2015, Halifax was acquired by New Media Investment Group.The Times has twelve-month average circulation of 19,400 daily and 20,600 Sunday. Of the 25 daily newspapers published in Alabama, the Times has the ninth highest daily circulation.The Times has received several awards over the years from area journalistic groups, such as the Alabama Press Association, the Alabama Sports Writers Association, and the Alabama Associated Press Managing Editors.The Times website provides local news coverage, as well as local forum and lifestyle pages. In addition to its editorial offices in Gadsden, the Times maintains a state capital bureau in Montgomery.

The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. Founded in 1851, the paper has won 125 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 17th in the world by circulation and 2nd in the U.S.

The paper is owned by The New York Times Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure. It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G. Sulzberger, the paper's publisher, and his father, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., the company's chairman, are the fourth and fifth generation of the family to helm the paper.Nicknamed "The Gray Lady", the Times has long been regarded within the industry as a national "newspaper of record". The paper's motto, "All the News That's Fit to Print", appears in the upper left-hand corner of the front page.

Since the mid-1970s, The New York Times has greatly expanded its layout and organization, adding special weekly sections on various topics supplementing the regular news, editorials, sports, and features. Since 2008, the Times has been organized into the following sections: News, Editorials/Opinions-Columns/Op-Ed, New York (metropolitan), Business, Sports of The Times, Arts, Science, Styles, Home, Travel, and other features. On Sunday, the Times is supplemented by the Sunday Review (formerly the Week in Review), The New York Times Book Review, The New York Times Magazine and T: The New York Times Style Magazine. The Times stayed with the broadsheet full-page set-up and an eight-column format for several years after most papers switched to six, and was one of the last newspapers to adopt color photography, especially on the front page.

The New York Times Building

The New York Times Building is a skyscraper on the west side of Midtown Manhattan, New York City that was completed in 2007. Its chief tenant is The New York Times Company, publisher of The New York Times as well as the International New York Times, and other newspapers. Construction was by a joint venture of The New York Times Company, Forest City Ratner (Forest City Enterprises's New York subsidiary), and ING Real Estate. As of 2018, The New York Times Building is the eighth-tallest building in the city, tied with the Chrysler Building.

The New York Times International Edition

The New York Times International Edition is an English-language newspaper printed at 38 sites throughout the world and sold in more than 160 countries and territories. Founded under the title Paris Herald in 1887 in Paris as the European edition of the New York Herald, it changed owners and was renamed several times: it became the Paris Herald Tribune, global edition of the New York Herald Tribune in 1924, then the International Herald Tribune in 1967, with The Washington Post and The New York Times as joint parent newspapers.

In 2002, The New York Times Company took control of the International Herald Tribune, which was subtitled since then The Global Edition of the New York Times. On October 15, 2013, the paper was renamed The International New York Times, and in October 2016, it was fully integrated with its parent and renamed The New York Times International Edition. Autumn that year also saw the closing of editing and preproduction operations in the Paris newsroom, where the paper, under its various names, had been headquartered since 1887.

TimesDaily

The TimesDaily is the daily newspaper for Florence, Alabama. The TimesDaily covers a four-county region in Alabama including Lauderdale, Colbert, Franklin, and Lawrence counties, as well as portions of southern Tennessee and northeast Mississippi. In addition to editorial offices in Florence, The TimesDaily maintains a state capital bureau in Montgomery.The newspaper is owned by the Tennessee Valley Printing Co., which also publishes The Decatur Daily. The TimesDaily has a twelve-month average circulation of 28,900 daily and 30,500 Sunday. Of the 25 daily newspapers published in Alabama, The TimesDaily has the seventh highest daily circulation.The TimesDaily was founded in 1889 as The Florence Times and published its first edition on July 4, 1890. A sister paper, The Tri-Cities Daily, was founded in 1907. The merger of these two newspapers in 1967, which published for a time as The Florence Times—Tri-Cities Daily, gives The TimesDaily its distinctive name. In 1972, the TimesDaily was acquired by Worrell Newspapers. The New York Times Company acquired 8 daily papers, including the TimesDaily, from Worrell in 1982. The Tennessee Valley Printing Co. purchased the TimesDaily from the New York Times Regional Media Group, a subsidiary of the New York Times Company, in March 2009.

Times Books

Times Books (previously the New York Times Book Company) is a publishing imprint owned by The New York Times Company and licensed to Henry Holt and Company.

Times Books began as the New York Times Book Company in 1969, when The New York Times Company purchased Quadrangle Books, a small publishing house in Chicago, Illinois, founded in 1959 by Michael Braude. Its President was Melvin J. Brisk. Initially run entirely by The New York Times Company, the publishing arm name was changed to Times Books in 1977.

In 1984, the Times Company licensed the imprint to Random House. From 1991 through 1996, during the Random House tenure, the head of Times Books was Peter Osnos, who later founded Public Affairs Books.Times Books was re-licensed in 2000 as an imprint of Henry Holt, which is itself an imprint of Holtzbrinck Publishers/Macmillan, the U.S. arm of the Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group.

Editorial directors for Times Books have included David Sobel and Paul Golob.Times Books has had a somewhat controversial right of first refusal policy with respect to manuscripts by employees of The New York Times Company.

The current location of Times Books is 115 West 18th Street, between Sixth and Seventh Avenues in the Chelsea/Flatiron area of Manhattan, New York City, United States.

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