The Longest Voyage

"The Longest Voyage" is a science fiction short story by American writer Poul Anderson. It won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1961.

"The Longest Voyage"
Longest Voyage
AuthorPoul Anderson
Genre(s)Science fiction
PublisherAnalog Science Fiction and Fact
Publication date1960

Plot summary

On a distant world the age of exploration is beginning. A party of daring explorers attempts to circumnavigate their world. In unknown waters they encounter an island civilization which claims to have a prophet who fell from the stars.

Reception

"The Longest Voyage" won the 1961 Hugo Award for Best Short Story.[1]

Jean-Daniel Brèque has described "The Longest Voyage" as "a rousing adventure yarn", "solidly plotted, like a well-oiled mechanism", and "also a work of poetry".[2]

Gardner Dozois, upon selecting "The Longest Voyage" for inclusion in his 2000 anthology Explorers: SF Adventures to Far Horizons, said that it is "nearly unmatched" in science fiction for its "lyricism, compassion, subtlety, thoughtfulness, and above all the relish it takes in the bristling strangeness and wonder of the world".[3]

Steven H. Silver commented that what distinguishes "The Longest Voyage" from similar stories is that "Anderson provides strong motivation for both the explorers and the natives".[4]

References

  1. ^ 1961 Hugo Awards, at TheHugoAwards.org; retrieved January 6, 2017
  2. ^ News from France: A Man Who Counts, by Jean-Daniel Brèque; at DanSimmons.com; published 2008; retrieved May 30, 2015
  3. ^ Introduction to 'The Longest Voyage', in Explorers: SF Adventures to Far Horizons, by Gardner Dozois, published 2000 by MacMillan
  4. ^ THE HUGO WINNERS, VOLUME I - Edited by Isaac Asimov, reviewed by Steven H. Silver, on the SF Site; published no later than March 7, 2004 (earliest version on archive.org); retrieved May 30, 2015

External links

19th World Science Fiction Convention

The 19th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Seacon, was held September 2–4, 1961, at the Hyatt House Hotel in Seattle, Washington, United States. The convention chair was Wally Weber.The guest of honor at the 19th Worldcon was Robert A. Heinlein, who gave a speech titled "The Future Revisited". He was previously the guest of honor at the 3rd Worldcon and would again be the guest of honor at the 34th Worldcon. The Toastmaster was Harlan Ellison.

Cassandra (short story)

"Cassandra" is a science fiction short story by American writer C. J. Cherryh. It was first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in October 1978, and won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1979. It was only her second published short story, after "The Dark King" (1977).

"Cassandra" has been translated into German, French, Polish, Italian and Romanian.Short story writing is an activity that Cherryh generally only undertakes upon request or when an idea surfaces that does not lend itself to a novel. Receiving a Hugo Award for this story therefore came as a complete surprise to Cherryh.This short story is Cherryh's modern take on the Greek mythological figure Cassandra who had the gift of prophecy.

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After the start of World War I, AE2 was sent to German New Guinea with the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force, then spent time patrolling around Fiji. With no need for submarines in the Pacific or Indian theatres, AE2 was towed to the Mediterranean, and arrived off Egypt in early 1915. The boat was assigned to the Dardanelles Campaign, and was the first submarine to successfully penetrate the waterway and enter the Sea of Marmara. With orders to "run amok" inside Turkish territory, AE2 operated for five days before mechanical faults forced her to the surface, where she was damaged by the torpedo boat Sultanhisar. The submarine was scuttled by her crew, all of whom were captured.

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On 15 August 1945, Nerger was interned by the Soviet Union at the Sachsenhausen NKVD camp where he died two years later.

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The story originally appeared in the June 1979 issue of Omni. In 1980, it won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story as well as the Locus Award for best short story. It is set in the same fictional "Thousand Worlds" universe as several of Martin's other works, including Dying of the Light, Sandkings, Nightflyers, A Song for Lya and the stories collected in Tuf Voyaging.

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S-3 departed Pearl Harbor on 9 November and sailed to the West Coast where she operated until mid-July 1923. On 17 July, she took departure from San Francisco Bay to retransit the Panama Canal en route to New London.

Reaching New London on 5 September, she was attached to SubDiv 2, Atlantic Fleet, and assigned experimental duty at the Submarine School at New London, assuming the duties of S-1, flagship of SubDiv 2, which was conducting special experiments with aircraft. During the remainder of 1923 and the years following, into 1927, she ranged the East Coast conducting training operations and evaluating new techniques in submarine development.

In July 1927, S-3 and S-1 formed SubDiv 4 and began a schedule which included operational cruises to the Panama Canal Zone in the spring months of 1928-1930. The remaining months of those years were spent in operations along the New England coast.

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Winners is a collection of science fiction award-winning short fiction by American writer Poul Anderson, first published in paperback by Tor Books in August 1981. The pieces were originally published between 1960 and 1972 in the magazines The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Analog, and Galaxy Magazine.The book contains five novellas and novelettes by the author, all of which won literary awards.

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