The Last Will of a Russian Fascist

The Last Will of a Russian Fascist (Russian: Завещание русского фашиста, Zaveshchanie russkogo fashista) is a reprint edition published in 2001 of a book by Konstantin Rodzaevsky, the leader of the All-Russia Fascist Party. Circulation of the book was 12,000 copies, of which 5,000 were a first-edition volume with illustrations, and the remainder were a second-edition volume without illustrations.[1]

Zaveshchanie russkogo fashista
Zaveshanie
AuthorKonstantin Rodzaevsky
Original titleЗавещание русского фашиста
CountryRussia
LanguageRussian
Genrejournalism
PublisherFERI-V
Publication date
2001
Pages512
ISBN5-94138-010-0
OCLC49660451

Preface

The book begins with a preface by I. Dyakov, "At the Edge of Russian Graves", and a biography of Konstantin Rodzaevsky written by K. Gusev.

Monograph

The bulk of the book is the monograph by Rodzaevsky "Contemporary Judaisation of the World or the Jewish Question in the 20th Century", published in Harbin in 1943.[2] The monograph is divided into four parts:

  1. "Traveling around the world" discusses political geography, and the views of the author regarding the geography of the world in terms of the presence of Jews and the degree of their influence in a country
  2. "Excursion to the story": the author's conception of Jewish history
  3. "World Jewish interstate": the author's conception of the organization of Jewish communities of the world
  4. "The decision of our destiny": the author's opinions about contemporary world events, their causes, and the hidden consequences of the Jewish Policy

Azbuka fashizma

Also included in the book is "Azbuka fashizma" ("The ABC of fascism"),[3] compiled, edited and with additions by Rodzaevsky published in Harbin in 1934. This work represents 100 responses to 100 questions about fascism. At the end of book, the anthem of the Russian Fascist Party (VFP) is found.

Party documents

In the book published by VFP Program (approved 03/07/1935 in Harbin)[4] and approved by the Supreme Council of 25.10.1936, is included the VFP position papers: "On the party greeting" № 69,[5] "On the party flag of VFP" № 71, "On the National Flag and National Anthem" № 73, "On the party icon" № 67, "On the party banner" № 72, "On the party and form a hierarchical Signs" № 68 (with appendix – table of hierarchical letters), and "On the religious icon" № 65.

Articles

After the party documents in the book there are two articles by Aleksey Shiropaev: "Voice of Russian Truth" and "Russian of the future".[6]

Necessary additions

The book includes a statement dated October 4, 1997, concerning the rehabilitation of Rodzaevsky, Lev Okhotin, and others; the definition of the Military Collegium of the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation № 043/46 dated 26.03.1998; the refusal of rehabilitation of Rodzaevsky, Lev Okhotin and others; as well as the response from the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office on the legality of this definition.

Banned in Russia

On October 11, 2010, due to a decision by the Central District Court of Krasnoyarsk, the book became recognized in Russia as extremist material,[7][8][9][10] and the book has been included in the Federal List of Extremist Materials (№ 861).

Notes

  1. ^ К. В. Родзаевский. Завещание Русского фашиста М., ФЭРИ-В, 2001, Imprint
  2. ^ Contemporary Judaisation of the World or the Jewish Question in the 20th Century Archived 2014-03-04 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Azbuka fashizma
  4. ^ Text in Russian
  5. ^ Text in Russian
  6. ^ Aleksey Shiropaev. Articles. Poems. Archived 2009-10-02 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ Site Prosecutor Krasnoyarsk
  8. ^ Rodzaevsky book "Testament Russian fascist" was recognized as "extremist" material.
  9. ^ Book All-leader of the Fascist Party as extremist.
  10. ^ http://www.sova-center.ru/en/misuse/reports-analyses/2012/04/d24302/

References

  • Звезда и свастика: Большевизм и русский фашизм. М., Терра, 1994
  • Н.Е. Аблова. КВЖД и российская эмиграция в Китае. М., Русская панорама, 2004 ISBN 5-93165-119-5
Argentine Fascist Party

The Argentine Fascist Party (Partido Fascista Argentino, PFA) was a fascist political party in Argentina from 1932 until its official disbandment in 1936, when it was succeeded by the National Fascist Union (Union Nacional Fascista, UNF). Founded by Italian Argentines, the party was formed as a breakaway faction from Argentina's National Fascist Party (Partido Nacional Fascista, PNF). It was based upon Italian Fascism and was recognized by Benito Mussolini's Italian National Fascist Party in 1935. In the 1930s the party became a mass organization, particularly in Córdoba. Nicholás Vitelli led the PFA's branch in Córdoba until his death in 1934, whereafter Nimio de Anquín took the leadership of the party. The PFA's main political allies in Córdoba were the Argentine Civic Legion and the Nationalist Action of Argentina/Affirmation of a New Argentina movement.

Argentine Patriotic League

The Argentine Patriotic League (Liga Patriótica Argentina) was a Nacionalista paramilitary group, officially created in Buenos Aires on January 16, 1919, during the Tragic week events. Presided over by Manuel Carlés, a professor at the Military College and the Escuela Superior de Guerra, it also counted among its members the deputy Santiago G. O'Farrell (1861-1926). The League was merged into the Argentine Civic Legion in 1931. The Argentine Patriotic League formed part of a larger movement of patriotic leagues active in Chile and Argentina during the early 20th century.

Blueshirts (Falange)

The Blueshirts (Spanish: Camisas Azules) was the Falangist paramilitary militia in Spain. The name refers to the blue uniform worn by members of the militia. The colour blue was chosen for the uniforms in 1934 by the FE de las JONS because it was, according to José Antonio Primo de Rivera, "clear, whole, and proletarian," and is the colour typically worn by mechanics, as the Falange sought to gain support among the Spanish working class. In Francoist Spain the Blueshirts were officially reorganized and officially renamed the Falange Militia of the FET y de las JONS in 1940.

Brit HaBirionim

Brit HaBirionim (Hebrew: ברית הבריונים, The Strongmen Alliance (Alliance of Thugs)) was a clandestine, self-declared fascist faction of the Revisionist Zionist Movement (ZRM) in Mandatory Palestine, active between 1930 and 1933. It was founded by the trio of Abba Ahimeir, Uri Zvi Greenberg and Yehoshua Yeivin.

Crypto-fascism

Crypto-fascism is the secret support for, or admiration of, fascism. The term is used to imply that an individual or group keeps this support or admiration hidden to avoid political persecution or political suicide. The common usage is "crypto-fascist", one who practices this support.

Faisceau

Le Faisceau (French pronunciation: ​[lə fɛso], The Fasces) was a short-lived French Fascist political party. It was founded on November 11, 1925 as a far right league by Georges Valois. It was preceded by its newspaper, Le Nouveau Siècle - founded as a weekly on February 26, it became a daily after the party's creation.

Fascio

Fascio (pronounced [ˈfaʃʃo]; plural fasci) is an Italian word literally meaning "a bundle" or "a sheaf", and figuratively "league", and which was used in the late 19th century to refer to political groups of many different (and sometimes opposing) orientations. A number of nationalist fasci later evolved into the 20th century Fasci movement, which became known as fascism.

Fascist Union of Youth

The Fascist Union of Youth (Russian: Союз Фашистской Молодёжи, Soyuz Fashistskoy Molodyozhi) was the youth organization of the Russian Fascist Party. It was founded in 1936 in Harbin, Manchukuo, which consisted of all automatic members of the organizations VFP from ages 16 to 25.Ideology and tactics of the Union is entirely determined by ideology and tactics of the Russian Fascist Party.

Admission to the Union was carried out automatically: all members of the organization VFP appropriate age, regardless of gender. Members of the Union remained part of the VFP.The Union was divided into two groups, Junior and Senior, each of which had two levels, Second Level (Young Fascist) and First Level (Avangardisty). Members had to pass certain exams to advance to a higher level. Those who successfully passed to the second stage of the Union were enrolled in the Stolypin Fascist Academy.

The Union had cultural, educational, dramatic and philosophical circles, as well as sewing and language schools. The military and political sections were the most important ones in the Union. Structural units of the Union were branches of the Department of the VFP. The head of the Union was appointed by the Head of the VFP and the remaining leaders were appointed by the head of the Union.

Fashist

Fashist (Russian: Фашистъ, 'Fascist') was a Russian fascist publication, issued from Putnam, Connecticut, United States. It was published by Anastasy Vonsyatsky. Fashist was distributed among Russian exiles around the world.

Heroic capitalism

Heroic capitalism or dynamic capitalism was a concept that Italian Fascism took from Werner Sombart's explanations of capitalist development. This phase was known by Sombart as early capitalism. In 1933, Benito Mussolini claimed that capitalism began with dynamic or heroic capitalism (1830-1870) followed by static capitalism (1870-1914) and then reached its final form of decadent capitalism, known also as supercapitalism, which began in 1914.Mussolini argued that although he did not support this type of capitalism he considered it at least a dynamic and heroic form. Some Fascists, including Mussolini, considered it a contribution to the industrialism and technical developments, but they claimed not to favour the creation of supercapitalism in Italy due to its strong agricultural sector.Mussolini claimed that dynamic or heroic capitalism inevitably degenerates into static capitalism and then supercapitalism due to the concepts of bourgeois economic individualism. Instead, he proposed a state supervised economy, although he contrasted it to Russian state supercapitalism. Italian Fascism presented the economic system of corporatism as the solution that would preserve private initiatives and property while allowing the state and the syndicalist movement to intervene in the economy in the matters where private initiative intervenes in public affairs. This system would lead also to some nationalizations when necessary and the greatest participation of the employees in all the aspects of the company and in the utility given by the company.

Konstantin Rodzaevsky

Konstantin Vladimirovich Rodzaevsky (Russian: Константи́н Влади́мирович Родзае́вский; 11 August 1907 – 30 August 1946) was the leader of the Russian Fascist Party, which he led in exile from Manchuria. Rodzaevsky was also the chief editor of the RFP paper "Nash Put'". White émigré. Was lured by NKVD to return back from immigration to Soviet Union with false promises of immunity and executed after a show trial in Lubyanka prison cellar for "anti-soviet and counter-revolutionary activities".

List of fascist movements by country

This is a list of political parties, organizations, and movements that have been claimed to follow some form of fascist ideology. Since definitions of fascism vary, entries in this list may be controversial. For a discussion of the various debates surrounding the nature of fascism, see fascism and ideology and definitions of fascism.

This list has been divided into four sections for reasons of length:

List of fascist movements by country A–F

List of fascist movements by country G–M

List of fascist movements by country N–T

List of fascist movements by country U–Z

Nash Put' (newspaper)

Nash Put (Russian: Наш Путь, Our Way) was a daily newspaper founded by Konstantin Rodzaevsky on 3 October 1933, that was issued in Harbin (1933–41) and Shanghai (1941-1943). The newspaper was the official organ of the Russian Fascist Party. Nash Put' was published until July 1943. The newspaper promoted Christian Orthodoxy, Russian ultranationalism and fascism. Estimated circulation was 4,000. The paper was edited by Konstantin Rodzaevsky from 1933 to 1943. There was also a publishing house, "Izdatel'stvo gazety Nash Put'" (Russian: «Издательство газеты „Наш Путь“», "Publisher of the newspaper Our Way"). In 1936 it published Vladimir Kislitsin's memoirs In the fires of the Civil War: Memoires.

National Fascist Party (Argentina)

The National Fascist Party of Argentina (Partido Nacional Fascista) was a fascist political party formed in 1923. In 1932, a group broke away from the party to form the Argentine Fascist Party, which eventually became a mass movement in the Córdoba region of Argentina.

Proletarian nation

Proletarian nation was a term used by 20th century Italian nationalist intellectuals such as Enrico Corradini and later adopted by Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini to refer to Italy and other poorer countries that were subordinate to the Western imperialist powers. These powers were described by Mussolini as "plutocratic nations" (nazioni plutocratiche). Corradini associated the proletariat with the economic function of production and believed that the producers should be at the forefront of a new imperialist proletarian nation. Mussolini considered that the military struggles unfolding in Europe in the mid-20th century could have revolutionary consequences that could lead to an improvement in the position of Italy in comparison with the major imperialist powers such as Britain.

Nazism rejected the Marxist concept of internationalist class struggle, it identified "class struggle between nations" and sought to resolve internal class struggle in the nation while it identified Germany as a proletarian nation fighting against plutocratic nations.

Russian Fascist Organization

Russian Fascist Organization (RFO) was the name adopted by a Russian émigré group active in Manchuria before World War II.

The RFO was formed in 1925 by members of the Law Faculty at Harbin Normal University. Under the leadership of Prof. N.I. Nikiforov, it looked to Italian fascism for inspiration and produced the 'Theses of Russian Fascism' in 1927. The RFO smuggled some propaganda into the Soviet Union, although this was brought to the attention of China who banned the group from publishing such works. In 1931 the RFO absorbed into the newly founded Russian Fascist Party (RFP) under the leadership of Konstantin Rodzaevsky.

Tropical fascism

In African political science, tropical fascism is a type of post-colonial state which is either considered fascist or is seen to have strong fascist tendencies. Gnassingbé Eyadéma dictator of Togo and leader of the Rally of the Togolese People, Mobutu Sese Seko dictator of Zaire and leader of the Popular Movement of the Revolution and Idi Amin dictator of Uganda have all been considered an example of tropical fascism in Africa. The Coalition for the Defence of the Republic and larger Hutu Power movement, a Hutu ultranationalist and supremacist movement that organized and committed the Rwandan Genocide aimed at exterminating the Tutsi people of Rwanda, has been regarded as a prominent example of tropical fascism in Africa. Pol Pot and The Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia has been called a tropical fascist regime, as they officially renounced communism in 1981.

Union of Fascist Little Ones

The Union of Fascist Little Ones (Russian: Союз фашистских крошек, Soyuz fashistskikh kroshek) was a youth organization of the Russian Fascist Party. It was founded by Russian immigrants in 1934 in Harbin, China. It was open to "Russian boys and girls who believe in God, love Russia and respect labor".

The Union's declared goal was "saving Russian children from the streets and denationalization impact, raising them for future Russia in the Fascist spirit of religion and nationalism". The Union's members were Russian emigrant children aged between 3 and 10. Their parent's letter affirming agreement was all that was needed to secure membership.

Young Egypt Party (1933)

The Young Egypt Party (Arabic: حزب مصر الفتاة‎, Misr El-Fatah) was an Egyptian political party.

Russian fascism to 1945
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