The Kid from Cleveland

The Kid from Cleveland is a 1949 sports drama film starring George Brent, Lynn Bari and Russ Tamblyn. Directed by Herbert Kline, the film was released by Republic Pictures.

The Kid from Cleveland tells the story of a "troubled teenaged fan" being helped by his favorite baseball team – the Cleveland Indians. The Indians had just won the 1948 World Series and many of the team's players made appearances along with owner Bill Veeck, co-owner and former Major League Baseball star Hank Greenberg, and then current coach and Baseball Hall-of-Famer Tris Speaker. Also featured were the team's then current and former ballparks, Cleveland Municipal Stadium and League Park. Several Cleveland Indians and Boston Braves players also appear in the film in archive baseball footage segments from the 1948 World Series.

The Kid from Cleveland
The Kid From Cleveland (1949) poster
Directed byHerbert Kline
Produced byWalter Colmes
Written byHerbert Kline (Story)
John Bright
StarringGeorge Brent
Lynn Bari
Russ Tamblyn
Tommy Cook
Ann Doran
Louis Jean Heydt
K. Elmo Lowe
John Beradino
Music byNathan Scott
CinematographyJack Marta
Edited byJason H. Bernie
Production
company
Herbert Kline Productions
Distributed byRepublic Pictures
Release date
  • September 2, 1949 (Cleveland)
  • September 5, 1949 (U.S.)
Running time
89 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Cast

Cleveland Indians in the cast

as themselves:

Uncredited Cleveland Indians in the cast

(as themselves)

Baseball umpires (uncredited)

External links

1949 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world.

Ann Doran

Ann Lee Doran (July 28, 1911 – September 19, 2000) was an American character actress, possibly best known as the mother of Jim Stark (James Dean) in Rebel Without a Cause (1955). She was an early member of the Screen Actors Guild and served on the board of the Motion Picture & Television Fund for 30 years.

Cleveland

Cleveland ( KLEEV-lənd) is a major city in the U.S. state of Ohio, and the county seat of Cuyahoga County. The city proper has a population of 383,793, making it the 52nd-largest city in the United States and the second-largest city in Ohio. Greater Cleveland is ranked as the 32nd-largest metropolitan area in the U.S., with 2,055,612 people in 2016. A Gamma + city, Cleveland anchors the Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area, which had a population of 3,515,646 in 2010 and is ranked 15th in the nation.

Cleveland is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie, across the U.S. maritime border with Canada. It was founded in 1796 near the mouth of the Cuyahoga River by surveyors of the Connecticut Land Company, led by General Moses Cleaveland, after whom the city was named. Following the American Civil War, the town grew into a manufacturing center due to its location on both the river and the lake shore, as well as being a transportation hub on major railroad lines that connected the urban centers of the East Coast to Chicago.

The influx of large numbers of immigrants and migrants greatly expanded the size of the city and, by 1920, it grew into a densely-populated metropolis of 796,841 people, making it the fifth largest city in the nation at the time. Guided by the spirit of the City Beautiful movement, Cleveland boasts stunning architecture from this era, as best exemplified by the Cleveland Mall Plan. By 1930, the year of the dedication of Cleveland's iconic Terminal Tower skyscraper, the city had grown to a population of over 900,000 and, by 1950, that number grew to 914,808. Although hit by the decline of heavy industry in subsequent decades, Cleveland is now experiencing a comeback and its Downtown is growing. Today, its economy relies on diversified sectors including not only manufacturing, but also healthcare, biomedicals, financial services, and higher education. The internationally-renowned Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals are among Cleveland's major healthcare centers, and the nationally-ranked Case Western Reserve University is one of the city's many leading academic institutions.

Ohio's premier cultural center, Cleveland is home to Playhouse Square, the second largest performing arts district in the U.S. after New York City's Lincoln Center, as well as the Cleveland Orchestra (one of the "Big Five" American orchestras), the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The city boasts a nationally-renowned culinary culture and was named the 7th best food city in the nation by Time magazine in 2015. Known as the "Forest City" (among many other nicknames), Cleveland is richly endowed with an extensive shoreline and numerous parks and nature reserves, many of which are part of the Cleveland Metroparks system. The city has emerged as a national leader in environmental protection. In 2019, the American Rivers conservation association named the Cuyahoga River "River of the Year" in honor of "50 years of environmental resurgence" and clean-up by the city. Cleveland is also home to the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, the Cleveland Botanical Garden, and the Greater Cleveland Aquarium.

Cleveland Indians

The Cleveland Indians are an American professional baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Indians compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division. Since 1994, they have played at Progressive Field. The team's spring training facility is at Goodyear Ballpark in Goodyear, Arizona. Since their establishment as a major league franchise in 1901, the Indians have won two World Series championships: in 1920 and 1948, along with 10 Central Division titles and six American League pennants. The Indians' current World Series championship drought is the longest active drought among all 30 current Major League teams.The name "Indians" originated from a request by club owner Charles Somers to baseball writers to choose a new name to replace "Cleveland Naps" following the departure of Nap Lajoie after the 1914 season. The name referenced the nickname "Indians" that was applied to the Cleveland Spiders baseball club during the time when Louis Sockalexis, a Native American, played in Cleveland. Common nicknames for the Indians include the "Tribe" and the "Wahoos", the latter being a reference to their former logo, Chief Wahoo. Also, the team's mascot is named "Slider."

The franchise originated in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1894 as the Grand Rapids Rustlers, a minor league team that competed in the Western League. The team then relocated to Cleveland in 1900 and changed its name to the Cleveland Lake Shores. The Western League itself changed its name to the American League while continuing its minor league status. One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the major league incarnation of the club was founded in Cleveland in 1901. Originally called the Cleveland Bluebirds, the team played in League Park until moving permanently to Cleveland Stadium in 1946. At the end of the 2018 season, they had a regular season franchise record of 9,384–8,968 (.511). From August 24 to September 14, 2017, the Indians won 22 consecutive games, which is the longest winning streak in American League history.

Cleveland Stadium

Cleveland Stadium, commonly known as Municipal Stadium or Lakefront Stadium, was a multi-purpose stadium located in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the early multi-purpose stadiums, built to accommodate both baseball and football. The stadium opened in 1931 and is best known as the long-time home of the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball, from 1932 to 1993, and the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL), from 1946 to 1995, in addition to hosting other teams, sports, and being a regular concert venue. The stadium was a four-time host of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, one of the host venues of the 1948 and 1954 World Series, and the site of the original Dawg Pound, Red Right 88, and The Drive.

Through most of its tenure as a baseball facility, the stadium was the largest in Major League Baseball by seating capacity, seating over 78,000 initially and over 74,000 in its final years. It was superseded only by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum from 1958 to 1961, while it was the temporary home of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and by Mile High Stadium in 1993, the temporary home of the expansion Colorado Rockies. For football, the stadium seated approximately 80,000 people, ranking as one of the larger seating capacities in the NFL.

Former Browns owner Art Modell took over control of the stadium from the city in the 1970s and while his organization made improvements to the facility, it continued to decline. The Indians played their final game at the stadium in October 1993 and moved to Jacobs Field the following season. Although plans were announced to renovate the stadium for use by the Browns, in 1995 Modell announced his intentions to move the team to Baltimore citing the state of Cleveland Stadium as a major factor. The Browns played their final game at the stadium in December 1995. As part of an agreement between Modell, the city of Cleveland, and the NFL, the Browns were officially deactivated for three seasons and the city was required to construct a new stadium on the Cleveland Stadium site. Cleveland Stadium was demolished in 1996 to make way for FirstEnergy Stadium, which opened in 1999. Much of the debris from the demolition was placed in Lake Erie to create an artificial reef.

George Brent

George Brent (born George Patrick Nolan, 15 March 1904 – 26 May 1979) was an Irish-American stage, film, and television actor.

Greater Cleveland Film Commission

The Greater Cleveland Film Commission (GCFC) is a 501(c)(3) private non-profit organization, also known as the Greater Cleveland Media Development Corporation. Its mission is to bring jobs and economic impact to Northeast Ohio through the growth of a sustainable media production industry. It accomplishes this goal through a rigorous program of attraction, advocacy, and workforce development.

History of the Cleveland Indians

The Cleveland Indians are a professional baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. They are in the Central Division of Major League Baseball's American League. Since 1994, they have played in Progressive Field. The Cleveland team originated in 1900 as the Lake Shores, when the American League (AL) was officially a minor league. One of the AL's eight charter franchises, the major league incarnation of the club was founded in Cleveland in 1901.

Jack Marta

Jack A. Marta (March 5, 1903 – June 26, 1991) was a cinematographer who was active in hundreds of movies throughout his life.

John Beradino

John Beradino (born Giovanni Berardino, May 1, 1917 – May 19, 1996) was an American infielder in Major League Baseball and an actor. Known as Johnny Berardino during his baseball career, he was also credited during his acting career as John Berardino, John Baradino, John Barardino or John Barradino.

Larry Doby

Lawrence Eugene Doby (December 13, 1923 – June 18, 2003) was an American professional baseball player in the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball (MLB) who was the second black player to break baseball's color barrier and the first black player in the American League. A native of Camden, South Carolina and three-sport all-state athlete while in high school in Paterson, New Jersey, Doby accepted a basketball scholarship from Long Island University. At 17 years of age, he began his professional baseball career with the Newark Eagles as the team's second baseman. Doby joined the United States Navy during World War II. His military service complete, Doby returned to baseball in 1946, and along with teammate Monte Irvin, helped the Eagles win the Negro League World Series.

In July 1947—three months after Jackie Robinson made history with the Brooklyn Dodgers—Doby broke the MLB color barrier in the American League when he signed a contract to play with Bill Veeck's Cleveland Indians. Doby was the first player to go directly to the majors from the Negro leagues. A seven-time All-Star center fielder, Doby and teammate Satchel Paige were the first African-American players to win a World Series championship when the Indians took the crown in 1948. He helped the Indians win a franchise-record 111 games and the AL pennant in 1954, finished second in the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) award voting and was the AL's RBI leader and home run champion. He went on to play for the Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, and Chunichi Dragons before his retirement as a player in 1962.

Doby later served as the second black manager in the majors with the Chicago White Sox, and in 1995 was appointed to a position in the AL's executive office. He also served as a director with the New Jersey Nets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was selected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998 by the Hall's Veterans Committee and died in 2003 at the age of 79.

List of American films of 1949

A list of American films released in 1949.All the King's Men won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

List of sports films

This compilation of films covers all sports activities. Sports films have been made since the era of silent films, such as the 1915 film The Champion starring Charlie Chaplin. Films in this genre can range from serious (Raging Bull) to silly (Horse Feathers). A classic theme for sports films is the triumph of an individual or team who prevail despite the difficulties, standard elements of melodrama.

Louis Jean Heydt

Louis Jean Heydt (April 17, 1903 – January 29, 1960) was an American character actor in film, television and theatre, most frequently seen in hapless, ineffectual, or fall guy roles.

Lynn Bari

Lynn Bari (born Margaret Schuyler Fisher, December 18, 1913 – November 20, 1989) was a film actress who specialized in playing sultry, statuesque man-killers in roughly 150 20th Century Fox films from the early 1930s through the 1940s.

Nathan Scott (composer)

Nathan Scott (May 11, 1915 – February 27, 2010) was an American film score and television composer. He composed, conducted, arranged and orchestrated more than 850 separate credits in television, as well as the music for more than 100 films. His credits in television included Lassie, The Twilight Zone and Dragnet, while his film credits included the film score for Wake of the Red Witch.

Russ Tamblyn

Russell Irving Tamblyn (born December 30, 1934) is an American film and television actor and dancer. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Tamblyn was trained as a gymnast in his youth. He began his career as a child actor for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Tamblyn appeared in the musical Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954). He subsequently portrayed Norman Page in the drama Peyton Place (1957), for which he earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. This led to Tamblyn being cast in leading roles, such as in the crime film High School Confidential (1958), and in the title role of Tom Thumb (1958).

Tamblyn's gymnastic and acrobatic talents were showcased in several other musicals, including West Side Story (1961), in which he portrayed Riff, the leader of the Jets gang. The success of West Side Story led to additional leading roles, including parts in the horror film The Haunting (1963), directed by Robert Wise, and the Japanese science fiction film The War of the Gargantuas (1966).

Throughout the 1970s, Tamblyn appeared in several exploitation films and worked as a choreographer in the 1980s. In 1990, he starred as Dr. Lawrence Jacoby in David Lynch's television drama Twin Peaks, reprising the role during its 2017 revival.

Stanley Wilson (composer)

Stanley Wilson (November 25, 1917 – July 12, 1970) was an American musical conductor, arranger and film composer.

Tommy Cook (actor)

Tommy Cook (born July 5, 1930) is an American producer, screenwriter and actor. He came up with the story for the 1977 disaster film Rollercoaster, starring George Segal. Cook also voiced Augie Anderson and Biff on Hanna-Barbera's animated series The Funky Phantom and Jabberjaw.

Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Key personnel
Postseason appearances (14)
Division championships (10)
American League pennants (6)
World Series championships (2)
Hall of Fame inductees
Minors

Languages

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