The Hudson Reporter

The Hudson Reporter is a newspaper chain based in Hudson County, New Jersey. It is the only weekly newspaper chain in Hudson County and one of only two newspaper companies in this busy metropolitan area. The Hudson Reporter publications focus on local politics and community news. In addition to articles written by the staff, the papers print readers' letters to the editor. The oldest newspaper in the chain is the Hoboken Reporter, founded in 1983.

The company publishes eight weekly newspapers and three local lifestyle magazines. The papers cover news and features in Bayonne, Hoboken, Jersey City, North Bergen, Weehawken, Secaucus, West New York, Union City, and Guttenberg. The lifestyle magazines cover Bayonne (Bayonne: Life on the Peninsula), Hoboken (07030), and Jersey City (Jersey City Magazine).[1]

The Hudson Reporter
7.17.16HudsonReporterByLuigiNovi2
The newspaper's headquarters since June 2016, at 447 Broadway in Bayonne
TypeWeekly newspaper
Owner(s)Newspaper Media Group
Founder(s)Joseph Barry
EditorCaren Matzner
Founded1983
Headquarters447 Broadway
Bayonne, New Jersey 07002
CountryUnited States
WebsiteOfficial website

History

The Hudson Reporter was founded in 1983 by Hoboken-based developer Joseph Barry, founder of the development company Applied Housing, who bought the weekly Hoboken Pictorial and its group of local newspapers. Its first newspaper was The Hoboken Reporter,[2][3] which Barry published out of a small building in downtown Hoboken. It subsequently moved to a basement office on 14th Street. As Barry's real estate holdings in Hudson County grew throughout the 1980s, the organization bought a chain of local newspapers and consolidated them into a coordinated weekly paper group. In 1995 the chain moved to a large, historic bank building at 1400 Washington Street, across the street from the basement office.[1][2] Lucha Malato joined the company in 1983 and David Unger in 1985.[3] both becoming his minority partners.[2] In 1987, the chain began The Secaucus Reporter. It eventually added similar papers as part of its Reporter brand for Jersey City, North Bergen, Weehawken, Union City, and West New York. The company purchased the Bayonne Community News in 2004 and relocated to Bayonne in 2016.[3] In 1999, with the real estate market becoming even busier, Barry no longer had time to dedicate to the newspapers, and sold his majority share in the company to Malato and Unger. In 2004, the group bought the Bayonne Community News.[1][2][3]

1.20.10HudsonReporterByLuigiNovi
The building on the corner of 14th Street and Washington Street in Hoboken, that housed the Reporter from 1995 to June 2016

After both offices lost power during Hurricane Sandy in October/November 2012, the staff worked out of Palisades Medical Center.[4]

In early June 2016, after 33 years in Hoboken, the paper moved its main office to 447 Broadway in Bayonne, three blocks from the 22nd Street Light Rail station. The consolidation of the staff at the new location also saw the closing of the small satellite office in Bayonne that published the Bayonne Community News for years. Among the reasons Malato cited for the move was the amount of unused space at previous Hoboken location, such as the large darkroom that became obsolete since the staff's adoption of digital photography around 2000. The company continues to maintain its distribution facility in North Bergen.[1]

On June 10, 2018, it was announced that publishers Lucha Malato and David Unger had sold the Hudson Reporter Assoc. LP, the company that publishes their papers, to the Newspaper Media Group (NMG) of Cherry Hill, New Jersey, a publisher of more than 50 weekly community newspapers in Central and Southern New Jersey and Philadelphia, as well as a monthly newspaper on Staten Island. Newspaper Media Group Owner & CEO Richard Donnelly stated, "The decision to purchase the Hudson Reporter was an easy one. The award-winning publications fit perfectly into our successful business model of community newspapers. Pooling resources and talent will ensure an even greater success story down the road. We are excited to add this exceptional group of papers to our growing family."[3][5][6]

Accolades

The chain and its writers have won numerous awards for investigative reporting,[3] going beyond the norm for weekly newspapers. The company has become a training ground for reporters and writers in the New York area, having sent two to The New York Times, and several to other top publications including The Star-Ledger and news organizations like Associated Press.

Other writers have published novels[7] and nonfiction books, and written for television.

Publications

Current publications

As of June 2018, The Hudson Reporter publishes the following eight community newspapers:[3][5]

The company also publishes three magazines:[3][5]

Former publications

  • Hudson Current, an arts and entertainment publication
  • Gateway Guide, a quarterly New Jersey tourism magazine published until late 2006

References

  1. ^ a b c d Pasquariello, Rory (June 12, 2016). "Hudson Reporter offices move: Newspaper chain relocates to new building in Bayonne". The Hudson Reporter.
  2. ^ a b c d "Hudson Reporter chain expands Newspaper company purchases Bayonne Community News". The Hudson Reporter. February 6, 2004.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Clark, Zane (June 10, 2018). "Newspaper Media Group acquires the Hudson Reporter newspaper chain". The Mt. Laurel Sun.
  4. ^ "About this special edition". The Hudson Reporter. November 4, 2012. Page 1
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Newspaper Media Group (NMG) acquires Hudson Reporter Assoc. LP, a group of 8 weekly local newspapers". Philadelphia Weekly. June 8, 2018
  6. ^ "Reporter newspaper chain sold to Newspaper Media Group". The Hudson Reporter. June 9, 2018.
  7. ^ Steinberg, Becki (June 10, 2010). "College alumnus to re-release lauded novel". The Daily Pennsylvanian. Retrieved June 13, 2010.
  8. ^ Jersey City Magazine Archived 2009-02-08 at the Wayback Machine

External links

Bayonne, New Jersey

Bayonne bay-OWN is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. Located in the Gateway Region, Bayonne is situated on a peninsula located between Newark Bay to the west, the Kill Van Kull to the south, and New York Bay to the east. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 63,024, reflecting an increase of 1,182 (+1.9%) from the 61,842 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 398 (+0.6%) from the 61,444 counted in the 1990 Census.Bayonne was originally formed as a township on April 1, 1861, from portions of Bergen Township. Bayonne was reincorporated as a city by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 10, 1869, replacing Bayonne Township, subject to the results of a referendum held nine days later. At the time it was formed, Bayonne included the communities of Bergen Point, Constable Hook, Centreville, Pamrapo and Saltersville.Bayonne is east of Newark, the state's largest city, north of Elizabeth in Union County and west of Brooklyn. It shares a land border with Jersey City to the north and is connected to Staten Island by the Bayonne Bridge. While somewhat diminished, traditional manufacturing, distribution, and maritime activities remain a driving force of the economy of the city, and a portion of the Port of New York and New Jersey is located there.

Bayonne Community News

The Bayonne Community News is a weekly community newspaper serving Bayonne, in Hudson County, New Jersey. The paper is one of nine weekly publications produced by The Hudson Reporter Assoc., L.P.

The Community News was founded in 1978 by publisher Edward Kukowski, who sold the paper to the Hudson Reporter in 2004. The company's main office is located in Bayonne, but the Community News.

Hudson Reporter publications focus on local politics, longform journalism, and community news. The newspaper prints editorials, feature stories, columns, and letters to the editor.

Brian P. Stack

Brian P. Stack (born May 16, 1966) is an American Democratic Party politician who serves in the New Jersey Senate, where he represents the 33rd Legislative District and has also served as the Mayor of Union City, New Jersey since 2000. Prior to his election to the Senate, he served in the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature, the General Assembly from 2004 to 2008.

He is considered by PolitickerNJ to be one of the most powerful elected officials in Hudson County, New Jersey. In 2012 The Hudson Reporter named him #2 in its list of Hudson County's 50 most influential people, behind North Bergen mayor Nicholas Sacco. In 2013, he and Sacco were tied at #3, and in 2015 he was ranked #7.

Caren Lissner

Caren Lissner is an American novelist, essayist, and newspaper editor. Her published novels include Carrie Pilby (2003) and Starting from Square Two (2004). She has also published essays, articles, and satire in The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Atlantic, and McSweeney's Internet Tendency. She is editor-in-chief of the Hudson Reporter group of newspapers based in Hoboken, New Jersey. Her novel Carrie Pilby was re-released July 1, 2010, by Harlequin Teen and was made into an independent film of the same name starring Bel Powley and Nathan Lane. The film debuted in theaters in March 2017, and was released to Netflix in September 2017.

Lissner was born in 1973, grew up in Freehold Township, New Jersey, and attended Laura Donovan School and Barkalow Middle School. She graduated from Cedar Ridge High School in Old Bridge Township, New Jersey and the University of Pennsylvania, where she wrote for the student newspaper, the Daily Pennsylvanian, and was a member of the Philomathean Society.

Felix Roque

Felix Roque is a Cuban-American medical doctor, U.S. Army Reserve colonel, and Democratic Party politician who is the current Mayor of West New York, New Jersey. The five-person slate he led defeated a slate headed by Mayor Silverio Vega in the May 10, 2011 general election and his running mates chose Roque to serve as the town's mayor. Subsequently to this, his allegiance with Commissioner Count Wiley, who had previously helped him unseat Vega, soured, and Wiley was his chief opponent in the May 2015 election, which Roque won.In 2012 the Hudson Reporter named him #50 in its list of Hudson County's 50 most influential people. In 2013 he was ranked #57, and in 2014 he and Deputy Mayor Silvio Acosta were tied for #30.

Hoboken Reporter

The Hoboken Reporter is a weekly community newspaper serving Hoboken, in Hudson County, New Jersey.The paper is one of nine weekly publications produced by The Hudson Reporter Assoc., L.P. The company's main office is located at 14th and Washington streets in Hoboken. The paper and its writers have won numerous awards for investigative reporting. Since its founding in 1983, the Reporter has become a major news source in town.

As of March 2013, Dean DeChiaro is the paper's lead correspondent.

The Hudson Reporter publications focus on local politics and community news. In addition to articles written by the reporting staff, the paper's letters-to-the-editor page has proven popular, even spawning a book of letters, Yuppies Invade My House at Dinnertime, in 1987. Journalists who started their careers at the Reporter have gone on to full-time positions at major newspapers including The New York Times and New York Post.

Hudson Catholic Regional High School

Hudson Catholic Regional High School is a regional four-year co-educational University-preparatory Catholic high school in Jersey City, in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. The school was established in 1964 by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark, and currently serves young men and young women in ninth through twelfth grades. The high school was conducted by the De La Salle Christian Brothers of the Baltimore District, later the District of Eastern North America, from its inception until 2008; the remaining Brothers were withdrawn in the summer of 2012, leaving the school entirely in the hands of the Archdiocesan education office. The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1972.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 495 students and 24.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 20.6:1. The school's student body was 36.2% Hispanic, 19.2% White, 16.6% Black, 11.3% Asian, 0.2% Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander and 16.6% two or more races.

Joey Diaz

José Antonio "CoCo" Díaz (born February 19, 1963) is a Cuban-American standup comedian, actor, and podcast host. Born in Cuba and raised in North Bergen, New Jersey, Diaz began his stand-up career in 1991. He had roles in the television series My Name Is Earl and the films The Longest Yard and Taxi. Since 2012, Diaz has hosted the podcast, The Church of What's Happening Now, is a regular guest on The Joe Rogan Experience, and produced an autobiographical documentary.

Mark Lukasiewicz

Mark Lukasiewicz (born March 8, 1973) is a former professional baseball pitcher who played two seasons for the Anaheim Angels of Major League Baseball.

Lukasiewicz grew up in Secaucus, New Jersey and graduated from Secaucus High School in 1991 before being inducted into the school's Hall of Fame in 2003.Drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays in 1993, Lukasiewicz spent from 1994 to 2000 in their minor leagues before signing with the Anaheim Angels in 2001. He made his major league debut at the age of 28 in 2001. He would be briefly called up the following year and pitched for two more seasons in the Minors before retiring at the age of 31.

North Bergen, New Jersey

North Bergen is a township in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 60,773, reflecting an increase of 2,681 (+4.6%) from the 58,092 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 9,678 (+20.0%) from the 48,414 counted in the 1990 Census. The town was founded in 1843. It was much diminished in territory by a series of secessions. Situated on the Hudson Palisades, it is one of the "hilliest" municipalities in the United States. Like neighboring North Hudson communities, North Bergen is among those places in the nation with the highest population density and a majority Hispanic population.

North Bergen Reporter

The North Bergen Reporter is a weekly community newspaper serving North Bergen, in Hudson County, New Jersey. The paper is one of nine weekly publications produced by The Hudson Reporter Assoc., L.P. The company's main office is located in Hoboken.

Hudson Reporter publications focus on local politics and community news. In addition to articles written by the staff, the papers print readers' letters to the editor.

Otis Davis

For the baseball player, see Otis Davis (baseball)

Otis Crandall Davis (born July 12, 1932) is a former American athlete, winner of two gold medals for record-breaking performances in both the 400 m and 4×400 m relay at the 1960 Summer Olympics. Davis set a new world record of 44.9 seconds in the 400 m event, and he became the first man to break the 45-second barrier.

Secaucus, New Jersey

Secaucus ( SEE-kaw-kəs) is a town in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town's population was 16,264, reflecting an increase of 333 (+2.1%) from the 15,931 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,870 (+13.3%) from the 14,061 counted in the 1990 Census.Located within the New Jersey Meadowlands, it is the most suburban of the county's municipalities, though large parts of the town are dedicated to light manufacturing, retail, and transportation uses, as well as protected areas.Secaucus is a derivation of the Algonquian words for "black" (seke or sukit) and "snake" (achgook), or "place of snakes", or sekakes, referring to snakes.

Secaucus Reporter

The Secaucus Reporter is a weekly community newspaper serving Secaucus, in Hudson County, New Jersey. The paper is one of nine weekly publications produced by The Hudson Reporter Assoc., L.P. The company's main office is located in Hoboken.

Hudson Reporter publications focus on local politics and community news. In addition to articles written by the staff, the papers print readers' letters to the editor.

The Secaucus Reporter was published under the banner The Secaucus Press before being purchased by The Hudson Reporter.

Trump Plaza (Jersey City)

Trump Plaza also known as Trump Plaza Residences, is the first of two apartment complex buildings to be built in Jersey City, New Jersey. Trump Plaza Residences is 532 ft tall (162 m) and has 55 floors, and is the tallest residential building in New Jersey.

The property was initially approved in 1999 for a twin-tower project to be known as HarborSpire, which never materialized. In 2005, Donald Trump and Dean Geibel partnered to develop Trump Plaza on the property. The project was to consist of two towers, the first of which opened in 2008. The second tower, known as Trump Bay Street, was opened in 2016.

Union City, New Jersey

Union City is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. According to the 2010 United States Census the city had a total population of 66,455, reflecting a decline of 633 (−0.9%) from the 67,088 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 9,076 (+15.6%) from the 58,012 counted in the 1990 Census. As of the 2010 Census it was the most densely populated city in the United States, with a density of 51,810.1 per square mile.Union City was incorporated as a city by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 1, 1925, with the merger of Union Hill and West Hoboken Township. The city's name marks the combination of the two municipalities.Two major waves of immigration, first of German speakers and then of Spanish speakers, greatly influenced the development and character of Union City. Its two nicknames, "Embroidery Capital of the United States" and "Havana on the Hudson", reflect important aspects of that history. Thousands make a pilgrimage to Union City each year to see the nation's longest-running passion play and the annual Cuban Day Parade of New Jersey.

The city is notable for being the location where Mallomars were first sold and the site of the first lunch wagon built by Jerry and Daniel O'Mahoney and John Hanf, which helped spark New Jersey's golden age of diner manufacturing, and made the state the diner capital of the world.

Union City High School

Union City High School is a three-year comprehensive public high school serving students in tenth through twelfth grades from Union City, in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States, operating as part of the Union City Board of Education. The four-story school is located between Kennedy Boulevard and Summit Avenue, from 24th to 26th Street, with additional facilities a block south on Kerrigan Avenue. The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1928.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 2,723 students and 178.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.3:1. There were 2,042 students (75.0% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 240 (8.8% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.The school opened in September 2009, merging the student bodies of the city's prior two high schools, Union Hill High School and Emerson High School, and marking the first high school opened in the city in 90 years. The school, which was built on the site of the former Roosevelt Stadium, cost $180 million, covers 4.5 acres (1.8 ha) and includes a rooftop football field. The school's colors are navy blue and silver.

Weehawken, New Jersey

Weehawken is a township in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 12,554, reflecting a decline of 947 (-7.0%) from the 13,501 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,116 (+9.0%) from the 12,385 counted in the 1990 Census.

Weehawken High School

Weehawken High School is a four-year comprehensive public high school that serves students in seventh through twelfth grade from Weehawken, in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States, operating as part of the Weehawken School District. The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1928.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 538 students and 48.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.2:1. There were 263 students (48.9% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 46 (8.6% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.