The House That Stood Still

The House That Stood Still is a science fiction novel by Canadian-American author A. E. van Vogt, first published in 1950. It was also published under the titles The Mating Cry (1960, revised edition) and The Undercover Aliens (1976).

The House That Stood Still
House Stood Still
Dust-jacket of the first edition
AuthorA. E. van Vogt
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction
PublisherGreenberg
Publication date
1950
Media typePrint (Hardback)
Pages210 pp
OCLC990522

Plot outline

Through various intrigues and investigations, a California estate lawyer learns that the pre-Toltec stone building upon which his retainer's ancestor, a conquistador, built a mansion four centuries earlier, confers immortality to those who know its secret. A cult of immortals operates secretly from the house and even has spaceships capable of travel to Mars where it has a base.

The lawyer falls for a beautiful cult member who tells him an atomic war is imminent and that most of the cultists want to remove the building's stones to Mars to keep their power safe from radioactive fallout. He makes it his mission to prevent the war, secure the secret of the ancient house for the benefit of all mankind, and get the girl.

Reception

Damon Knight reviewed the novel favorably, saying "Uncharacteristically [for van Vogt], all the threads in this story have been satisfactorily tied up, and the suspense is kept at a high level."[1] Groff Conklin described the original text as "readable" but criticized it for being short on "ideas, imagination [and] scope", describing it as an Erle Stanley Gardner detective story "forced into a science fiction mold".[2] Forrest J Ackerman reported that the novel "departs considerably" from van Vogt's previous work.[3] The New York Times reviewer Fletcher Pratt found House to be "one of the more original science fiction stories, if not one of the sounder," noting that "it is also frequently impossible to understand precisely what is going on."[4]

References

  1. ^ "The Dissecting Table", Worlds Beyond, December 1950, p.115
  2. ^ Conklin, Groff (January 1951). "Galaxy's 5 Star Shelf". Galaxy Science Fiction. pp. 137–139.
  3. ^ "Book Reviews", Astounding Science Fiction. April 1951, p.135
  4. ^ "Realm of the Spacement", The New York Times, December 17, 1950

External links

Children of Tomorrow

Children of Tomorrow is a 1970 science fiction novel by Canadian-American author A. E. van Vogt.

Galaxy Science Fiction Novels

Galaxy novels, sometimes titled Galaxy Science Fiction Novels, were a series of mostly reprint American science fiction novels published between 1950 and 1961.

The series was started by H.L. Gold, the editor of Galaxy Science Fiction, in 1950 as a companion to the main Galaxy magazine. There was one (often abridged) novel per issue, which appeared in digest size format, which made the books in the series look like digest magazines.

In 1959, after 35 issues, the series was sold to Beacon Books, which changed the format to mass-market (small size) paperback and introduced its own numbering scheme, continuing the series for another 11 issues. They also had the contents of some books revised to add mild sexual content and changed their titles accordingly.

List of Harlequin Romance novels released in 1952

This is a list of Harlequin Romance novels released in 1952.

M33 in Andromeda

M33 in Andromeda is a collection of six science fiction stories by Canadian-American writer A. E. van Vogt, first published in April 1971.

Masters of Time

Masters of Time is a collection of two science fiction novellas by Canadian-American writer A. E. van Vogt. It was first published in 1950 by Fantasy Press in an edition of 4,034 copies. The novellas originally appeared in the magazine Astounding SF.

Monsters (collection)

Monsters is a collection of eight science fiction short stories by Canadian-American writer A.E. van Vogt; written during 1940 and 1950, they were assembled by Forrest J. Ackerman in 1965.

More Than Superhuman

More Than Superhuman is a collection of science fiction short stories by Canadian-American writer A.E. van Vogt, published in 1971.

Null-A Three

Null-A Three, usually written Ā Three, is a 1985 science fiction novel by A. E. van Vogt. It incorporates concepts from the General semantics of Alfred Korzybski and refers to non-Aristotelian logic.

The novel is a continuation of the adventures of Gilbert Gosseyn from The World of Null-A (1945) and The Pawns of Null-A (1948).

Out of the Unknown (collection)

Out of the Unknown is a collection of fantasy short stories by Canadian writers A. E. van Vogt and E. Mayne Hull. It was first published in 1948 by Fantasy Publishing Company, Inc. in an edition of 1,000 copies. The stories originally appeared in the magazine Unknown.

Quest for the Future

Quest for the Future is a science fiction novel by A. E. van Vogt. It was first published by Ace Books in 1970.

A schoolteacher from the 20th century becomes involved in the activities of a group of time travelers.

Rogue Ship

Rogue Ship is a 1965 science fiction novel by Canadian-American writer A. E. van Vogt, adapted from three short stories to form a novel. The three short stories used were:

"Centaurus II" (Originally published in Astounding Science-Fiction, June 1947)

"Rogue Ship" (Originally published in Super Science Stories, March 1950)

"The Expendables" (Originally published in if Worlds of Science Fiction, September 1963)Using Van Vogt's own terminology when creating a novel from 3 previous short stories, he named it a fixup.

Supermind (novel)

Supermind is a science fiction novel by A. E. van Vogt first published in complete form in 1977 by publisher DAW Books. It is a fix-up of "Asylum," a short story first published in Astounding Science Fiction in May 1942.

The Book of Ptath

The Book of Ptath is a science fiction novel by Canadian-American writer A. E. van Vogt. It was first published in book form in 1947 by Fantasy Press in an edition of 3,021 copies. The novel was originally serialized in the magazine Unknown in October 1943. The book has also appeared under the titles Two Hundred Million A.D. and Ptath.

The Man with a Thousand Names

The Man with a Thousand Names is a short science fiction novel by Canadian-American writer A. E. van Vogt. It was published in August 1974 by DAW Books, and in December 1975 by Sidgwick and Jackson.

The Mind Cage

The Mind Cage is a 1957 science fiction novel by Canadian-American writer A. E. Van Vogt, adapted from the short story "The Great Judge" (1948).

The Mixed Men

The Mixed Men is a fix-up novel of science fiction short stories by Canadian-American writer A. E. van Vogt that focus on the mixed offspring of Dellian Supermen and human beings. The novel's title is taken from van Vogt's 1945 Astounding SF short story "Mixed Men", which was nominated for a Retro-Hugo Award in 1996. The stories published in the novel were originally released between the years of 1943 to 1945 in Astounding SF, with the novel being first published in a 5,000 copy printing in 1952 by Gnome Press and a 1955 Berkley Books edition under the title Mission to the Stars.The novel is an early example of "fix-up" literature where several stories are re-written to make one cohesive novel.

The Weapon Makers

The Weapon Makers is a science fiction novel by Canadian writer A. E. van Vogt.

The novel was originally serialized in Astounding Science Fiction from February to April 1943. The serial version was first published in book form in 1947 with a print run of 1,000 copies. It was then thoroughly revised in 1952. All subsequent printings contain the 1952 text.

The events in the novel take place approximately seven years after the events described in The Weapon Shops of Isher (1951) even though the serial was published before some of the other Isher stories contained in The Weapon Shops of Isher. The first paperback edition, part of an Ace Double, was retitled One Against Eternity.

The Weapon Shops of Isher

The Weapon Shops of Isher is a science fiction novel by Canadian writer A. E. van Vogt, first published in 1951. The novel is a fix-up created from three previously published short stories about the Weapon Shops and Isher civilization:

"The Seesaw" (Analog Science Fiction and Fact, July 1941)

"The Weapon Shop" (Analog Science Fiction and Fact, December 1942)

"The Weapon Shops of Isher" (Wonder Stories, February 1949)

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