The Guv'nor and Other Short Stories

The Guv'nor and Other Short Stories (Collins,1932) is a short story compilation by the British crime writer Edgar Wallace.

These are the final stories about Mr. J. G. Reeder, a police officer with "the mind of a criminal". They include

  • "The Guv'nor"
  • "The Man Who Passed" ("The Man from Sing Sing")
  • "The Shadow Man"
  • "The Treasure House"

In America the book was published as Mr. Reeder Returns (The Crime Club, Doubleday, Doran, 1932) with the stories in a different order: "The Guv'nor", "The Man from Sing Sing", "The Treasure House", and "The Shadow Man".

A later (1965) edition Mr. J. G. Reeder Returns contains only "The Treasure House" and "The Shadow Man" - the 1969 imprint was a tie in with the 1969 Thames Television series The Mind of Mr. J. G. Reeder, starring Hugh Burden.

References

  • The Detective Short Story; A Bibliography by Ellery Queen (Little, Brown and Company, 1942, p. 111)
Der Hexer (1964 film)

Der Hexer (aka The Ringer, The Wizard or The Mysterious Magician) is a 1964 West German black and white mystery film directed by Alfred Vohrer and starring Joachim Fuchsberger. It was part of a very successful series of German films based on the writings of Edgar Wallace and adapted from the 1925 novel titled The Ringer (originally: The Gaunt Stranger). In 1965, a sequel Neues vom Hexer (Again the Ringer) was released.

Edgar Wallace

Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace (1 April 1875 – 10 February 1932) was an English writer.

Born into poverty as an illegitimate London child, Wallace left school at the age of 12. He joined the army at age 21 and was a war correspondent during the Second Boer War, for Reuters and the Daily Mail. Struggling with debt, he left South Africa, returned to London, and began writing thrillers to raise income, publishing books including The Four Just Men (1905). Drawing on his time as a reporter in the Congo, covering the Belgian atrocities, Wallace serialised short stories in magazines such as The Windsor Magazine and later published collections such as Sanders of the River (1911). He signed with Hodder and Stoughton in 1921 and became an internationally recognised author.

After an unsuccessful bid to stand as Liberal MP for Blackpool (as one of David Lloyd George's Independent Liberals) in the 1931 general election, Wallace moved to Hollywood, where he worked as a script writer for RKO studios. He died suddenly from undiagnosed diabetes, during the initial drafting of King Kong (1933).

Wallace was such a prolific writer that one of his publishers claimed that a quarter of all books in England were written by him. As well as journalism, Wallace wrote screen plays, poetry, historical non-fiction, 18 stage plays, 957 short stories, and over 170 novels, 12 in 1929 alone. More than 160 films have been made of Wallace's work. He is remembered for the creation of King Kong, as a writer of 'the colonial imagination', for the J. G. Reeder detective stories, and for The Green Archer serial. He sold over 50 million copies of his combined works in various editions, and The Economist describes him as "one of the most prolific thriller writers of [the 20th] century", although few of his books are still in print in the UK.

Five Golden Dragons

Five Golden Dragons is a 1967 British/German international co-production comedy action film set in Hong Kong and photographed in Techniscope on location in September 1966 at the Tiger Balm Pagoda and Shaw Brothers studios. It was directed by Jeremy Summers and starred Bob Cummings in his final feature film, Margaret Lee who sings two songs in the film, Rupert Davies and a cast of "guest stars". The film was produced and written by Harry Alan Towers and features his wife Maria Rohm as the leading lady. The film features a minor connection to Edgar Wallace's short stories by using his Commissioner Sanders as an officer in the Royal Hong Kong Police with Towers using Wallace's name to attract funds from international film investors.

Neues vom Hexer

Neues vom Hexer (lit. "News from the Sorcerer"), aka Again the Ringer, is a 1965 West German black-and-white crime film directed by Alfred Vohrer and starring Heinz Drache. It is part of a series of German screen adaptations of Edgar Wallace's thriller novels, and the direct sequel of the 1964 film Der Hexer. It was also known as The Ringer Returns.

The Black Abbot (1963 film)

The Black Abbot (German: Der Schwarze Abt) is a 1963 West German mystery film directed by Franz Josef Gottlieb and starring Joachim Fuchsberger. It was part of a very successful series of German films based on the writings of Edgar Wallace and adapted from the 1926 novel of the same name.

The Curse of the Hidden Vault

The Curse of the Hidden Vault (German: Die Gruft mit dem Rätselschloß) is a 1964 black and white West German crime film directed by Franz Josef Gottlieb and starring Harald Leipnitz.

The Dead Eyes of London

The Dead Eyes of London (German: Die toten Augen von London and also known as Dark Eyes of London) is a 1961 West German black and white crime film directed by Alfred Vohrer and starring Joachim Fuchsberger, Karin Baal and Dieter Borsche.

The Devil's Daffodil

The Devil's Daffodil (also known as Daffodil Killer or German: Das Geheimnis der gelben Narzissen) is a 1961 British-West German black-and-white crime film directed by Ákos Ráthonyi. The film was produced in an English and a German version, starring different actors in the lead roles but otherwise featuring an almost identical cast and crew. It starred William Lucas in the English version and Joachim Fuchsberger in the German one.

The Door with Seven Locks (1962 film)

The Door with Seven Locks (German: Die Tür mit den sieben Schlössern) is a 1962 West German-French crime film directed by Alfred Vohrer and starring Heinz Drache. It is an adaptation of the Edgar Wallace novel The Door with Seven Locks.

The Great Unknown (1927 film)

The Great Unknown (German:Der große Unbekannte) is a 1927 German silent crime film directed by Manfred Noa and starring Jack Trevor, Arthur Kraußneck and Andrée Lafayette. It is based on a novel by Edgar Wallace.The film's sets were designed by the art director Karl Machus. It was shot at the Bavaria Studios in Munich.

The Indian Scarf

The Indian Scarf (German: Das indische Tuch) is a 1963 West German crime film directed by Alfred Vohrer. It was part of a very successful series of German films based on the writings of Edgar Wallace and adapted from the 1931 play The Case of the Frightened Lady.

The Inn on the River

The Inn on the River (German: Das Gasthaus an der Themse/ The Inn on the Thames) is a 1962 black-and-white West German crime film directed by Alfred Vohrer and starring Joachim Fuchsberger, Eddi Arent and Klaus Kinski.

The Puzzle of the Red Orchid

The Puzzle of the Red Orchid (German: Das Rätsel der roten Orchidee) and also known as The Secret of the Red Orchid) is a 1962 West German black-and-white crime film directed by Helmut Ashley and starring Christopher Lee, Adrian Hoven and Marisa Mell.It was made as part of the long-running series of Edgar Wallace adaptations made by Rialto Film. It was made at the Wandsbek Studios in Hamburg with location shooting in London and around the harbor at Cuxhaven.

The Ringer (1932 film)

The Ringer (German: Der Hexer) is a 1932 Austrian-German mystery film directed by Martin Frič and Karel Lamač and starring Paul Richter, Maria Matray and Wera Engels. It is a screen adaptation of Edgar Wallace's novel The Ringer. Another German version Der Hexer was made in 1964. It was shot at the Sievering Studios in Vienna. The film's sets were designed by the art director Heinz Fenchel.

The Squeaker (1963 film)

The Squeaker (German: Der Zinker) is a 1963 West German-French crime film directed by Alfred Vohrer and starring Heinz Drache. It was part of a very successful series of German films based on the writings of Edgar Wallace and adapted from the 1927 novel of the same name.

The Strange Countess

The Strange Countess (German: Die seltsame Gräfin) is a 1961 West German crime film directed by Josef von Báky and starring Joachim Fuchsberger based on Edgar Wallace's 1925 book of the same title.

The Trygon Factor

The Trygon Factor is a 1966 British-West German crime film directed by Cyril Frankel and starring Stewart Granger, Susan Hampshire and Robert Morley. It is one of the films based on works by Edgar Wallace of the 1960s and its German title is Das Geheimnis der weißen Nonne/ Mystery of the White Nun. The film is based on the Edgar Wallace novel Kate Plus Ten.

Traitor's Gate (film)

Traitor's Gate (German: Das Verrätertor) is a 1964 West German-British co-production of a black-and-white crime film directed by Freddie Francis and starring Albert Lieven and Gary Raymond. It was made by Rialto Film using Hammer Films' Freddie Francis and screenwriter Jimmy Sangster updating the 1927 novel The Traitor's Gate by Edgar Wallace to the mid-1960s. The film features a group of criminals planning to steal the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom from the Tower of London.

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