The Family Man

The Family Man is a 2000 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Brett Ratner, written by David Diamond and David Weissman, and starring Nicolas Cage and Téa Leoni. Cage's production company, Saturn Films, helped produce the film. The film centers on a man who experiences what his life might have been if he had made a different decision earlier in his life; is he just dreaming or is there a deeper explanation?

The Family Man
Family man movie
Theatrical release poster
Directed byBrett Ratner
Produced by
Written by
Starring
Music byDanny Elfman
CinematographyDante Spinotti
Edited byMark Helfrich
Production
companies
Distributed byUniversal Pictures
Release date
  • December 22, 2000
Running time
126 minutes[1]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$60 million[2]
Box office$124.7 million[2]

Plot

Jack and Kate, who have been together since college, are at JFK Airport, where Jack is about to leave to take up a twelve-month internship with Barclays in London. Kate fears the separation will be fatal for their relationship and asks him not to go, but he reassures her, saying their love is strong enough to last, and he flies out.

The scene fades out to "13 years later": Jack is now an unmarried Wall Street executive in New York City, living a carefree bachelor's life. At work, he is putting together a multi-billion dollar merger and has ordered an emergency meeting on Christmas Day. In his office, on Christmas Eve, he gets a message to contact Kate, but, even though he remembers her, he dismisses it, apparently uninterested.

On his way home, he is in a convenience store when a young man, Cash, enters claiming to have a winning lottery ticket worth $238, but the store clerk refuses him, saying the ticket is a forgery. Cash pulls out a gun and threatens him, so Jack offers to buy the ticket and Cash eventually agrees. Outside, Jack tries to help Cash, to which he responds by asking Jack if anything is missing from his life. Jack says he has everything he needs, whereupon Cash enigmatically remarks that Jack has brought upon himself what is now going to happen, and walks away. A puzzled Jack returns to his penthouse and sleeps.

On Christmas Day, Jack wakes up in a suburban New Jersey bedroom with Kate and two children. He rushes out to his condo and office in New York, but both doormen refuse him entrance and do not recognize him. Jack runs out into the street and encounters Cash driving Jack's Ferrari. Although Cash offers to explain what is happening, all he says is a vague reference to "The Organization" and that Jack is getting "a glimpse" which will help him to figure out for himself what it's about.

Jack slowly realizes that he is living the kind of life he might have had if he had stayed in the United States with Kate as she had asked. He has a modest family life, where he is a car tire salesman for Kate's father and Kate is a non-profit lawyer. Jack's young daughter, Annie, thinks he is an alien but a friendly one and assists him in fitting into his new life. With a few setbacks, Jack begins to succeed, bonding with his children, falling in love with his wife and working hard at his job.

Taking advantage of a chance meeting when his former boss, chairman Peter Lassiter, comes in to have a tire blowout fixed, he impresses him with his business savvy and Lassiter invites him to his office, where Jack worked in his 'other' life. There, after a short interview, Lassiter offers him a position. While he is excited by the potential salary and other perks, Kate argues that they are very happy and they should be thankful for the life they have.

Having decided that he now likes this 'other' life, Jack again sees Cash, now a store clerk. He demands to stay in this life, but Cash tells him there is no choice: "a glimpse", by definition, is an impermanent thing. That night, Jack tries to stay awake, but fails and wakes the "next day", Christmas Day, to find himself in his original life. He forgoes closing the acquisition deal to intercept Kate, finding her moving out of a luxury townhouse before flying to Paris. Like Jack, she has focused on her career, and has become a very wealthy corporate lawyer. She had only called him to return a box of his old possessions. He chases after her to the airport and, in an effort to stop her leaving, describes in detail their children and family life he had seen. Intrigued, she eventually agrees to go with him for a coffee. From a distance, they are seen talking animatedly over their coffees as the credits begin to roll.

Cast

Release

Box office

The Family Man opened at #3 at the North American box office making $15.1 million in its opening weekend, behind What Women Want and Cast Away, which opened at the top spot.[3] After 15 weeks in release, the film grossed $75,793,305 in the US and Canada and $48,951,778 elsewhere, bringing the film's worldwide total to $124,745,083.[2]

Critical reception

The film received mixed reviews from critics. Rotten Tomatoes gave the film a score of 53% based on 128 reviews, with an average rating of 5.49/10. The site's consensus states: "Despite good performances by Cage and especially by Leoni, The Family Man is too predictable and derivative to add anything new to the Christmas genre. Also, it sinks under its sentimentality".[4] Metacritic reports a 42 out of 100 rating based on 28 reviews, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[5]

Chris Gore from Film Threat said: "If you're looking for a heartfelt, feel-good holiday movie, just give in and enjoy". Matthew Turner from ViewLondon said: "Perfect feel-good Christmas-period family entertainment. Highly recommended."[6] Common Sense Media and Redbox both rate it 4 out of 5 stars. Movie guide.org rates it four of four stars, noting "The Family Man is a heart-rending movie. Very well written, it makes you laugh and cry. Better yet, it’s an intentionally moral movie. It wants to prove that everyone needs love..."

Emma Cochrane from Empire in 2015 wrote: "This is exactly the kind of adult fantasy you want to see at Christmas and, as such, it's highly enjoyable entertainment", and gave the film 3 stars out of 5.[7]

References

  1. ^ "THE FAMILY MAN (12)". British Board of Film Classification. December 5, 2000. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c "The Family Man (2000)". Box Office Mojo. Internet Movie Database. April 5, 2001. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  3. ^ "The Family Man (2000) - Weekend Box Office Results - Box Office Mojo".
  4. ^ "The Family Man (2000)". Rotten Tomatoes. Flixster. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  5. ^ "The Family Man reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  6. ^ "Rotten Tomatoes". 22 December 2000.
  7. ^ https://www.empireonline.com/movies/family-man/review/

External links

27th Saturn Awards

The 27th Saturn Awards, honoring the best in science fiction, fantasy and horror film and television in 2000, were held on 12 June 2001.Below is a complete list of nominees and winners. Winners are highlighted in bold.

Beacon Pictures

Beacon Pictures is an American film production and international sales company founded in 1990 by Armyan Bernstein, who is also its chairman. The company produces motion pictures for studios such as Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, Universal Pictures and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Beacon was acquired in 1996 for $29 million by COMSAT, who one year later put the company under its Ascent Entertainment Group division. By early 1999, Ascent was about to be broken up due to financial problems, mostly steming from building the Pepsi Center in Denver. Bernstein and venture capitalists Kevin O’Donnell and convicted criminal Reed Slatkin purchased Beacon back for $19 million, restoring its independent company status.

Brett Ratner

Brett Ratner (born March 28, 1969) is an American director and producer. He directed the Rush Hour film series, The Family Man, Red Dragon, X-Men: The Last Stand, and Tower Heist. He was also a producer of the films Black Mass, The Revenant, War Dogs, The Lego Ninjago Movie, and the Horrible Bosses series.Ratner got his start directing with music videos in the 1990s, and directed his first motion picture, Money Talks, in 1997. Overall, the films Ratner has directed have earned over $2 billion at the global box office.Ratner is the co-founder of RatPac Entertainment, a film production and financing company. Ratner led RatPac's partnership with Dune Entertainment in September 2013 for a co-financing deal with Warner Bros. that included 75 films.On January 19, 2017, Ratner received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contributions to the motion picture industry, located at 6801 Hollywood Boulevard.In late 2017, former marketing executive Melanie Kohler and six other women including actresses Olivia Munn, Natasha Henstridge and Ellen Page accused Ratner of sexual misconduct and harassment. Ratner sued Kohler for defamation.

David Weissman

David Weissman is an American screenwriter and director, most known for his comedies. Frequently collaborates with David Diamond.B Diamond and Weissman met in high school, at Akiba Hebrew Academy (now Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy). They graduated in 1983.

His film credits include Dream a Little Dream 2 (his only produced project not co-written with Diamond), The Family Man, Old Dogs, When in Rome, Evolution and the television film Minutemen.

Don Cheadle

Donald Frank Cheadle Jr. (; born November 29, 1964) is an American actor. Following early roles in Hamburger Hill (1987), and as the gangster "Rocket" in the film Colors (1988), Cheadle built his career in the 1990s with roles in Devil in a Blue Dress (1995), Rosewood (1997) and Boogie Nights (1997). His collaboration with director Steven Soderbergh resulted in the films Out of Sight (1998), Traffic (2000) and Ocean's Eleven (2001).

Cheadle was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor for his lead role as Rwandan hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina in the historical genocide drama film Hotel Rwanda (2004). From 2012 to 2016, he starred as Marty Kaan on the Showtime comedy series House of Lies; he won a Golden Globe Award in 2013 for the role.

Cheadle extended his global recognition with his role of War Machine in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, replacing Terrence Howard. He appeared in Iron Man 2 (2010), Iron Man 3 (2013), Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), Captain America: Civil War (2016), and Avengers: Infinity War (2018) and appears in the mid-credits scene of Captain Marvel (2019). He will reprise his role in Avengers: Endgame (2019).

Jeremy Piven

Jeremy Samuel Piven (born July 26, 1965) is an American actor, comedian, and producer. He is known for his role as Ari Gold in the comedy series Entourage, for which he won a Golden Globe Award and three consecutive Emmy Awards. He also starred in the British period drama Mr Selfridge, which tells the story of the man who created the luxury English department store chain Selfridges, and portrayed Spence Kovak on Ellen DeGeneres's sitcom Ellen.

KUBL-FM

KUBL-FM (93.3 FM) is a radio station broadcasting a country format. Licensed to Salt Lake City, Utah, United States, it serves the Salt Lake City area. The station's studios are located in South Salt Lake (behind the I-15/I-80 interchange) and its transmitter site is located southwest of the city on Farnsworth Peak in the Oquirrh Mountains.

Libido (1973 film)

Libido is a 1973 Australian drama film comprising 4 segments written and directed as independent stories, but screened together as one piece, exploring a common theme of instinctive desire and contemporary sexuality.John B. Murray directs a segment called "The Husband", written by Craig McGregor, Tim Burstall directs "The Child", from a screenplay by Hal Porter, Fred Schepisi directs Thomas Keneally's "The Priest" and David Baker directs playwright David Williamson's screenplay for "The Family Man".

Magical Negro

In the cinema of the United States, the Magical Negro is a supporting stock character who comes to the aid of white protagonists in a film. Magical Negro characters, who often possess special insight or mystical powers, have long been a tradition in American fiction.The term Magical Negro was popularized in 2001 by film director Spike Lee, while discussing films with students during a tour of college campuses, in which he said he was dismayed at Hollywood's decision to continue employing this premise; he noted that the films The Green Mile and The Legend of Bagger Vance used the "super-duper magical Negro".

Critics use the word "Negro" because it is considered archaic, and usually offensive, in modern English. This underlines their message that a "magical black character" who goes around selflessly helping white people is a throwback to stereotypes such as the "Sambo" or "noble savage".

Makenzie Vega

Makenzie Vega (born February 10, 1994) is an American actress. She is known for her role as Grace Florrick on The Good Wife and as the 11-year-old counterpart of Nancy Callahan in Sin City.

Mark Helfrich (film editor)

Mark Helfrich (born November 1957) is an American film editor and director. He is an elected member of American Cinema Editors (ACE) and serves on the board as an associate director. Helfrich has edited over thirty films such as Stone Cold (1991), Showgirls (1995) with Mark Goldblatt. Helfrich is also the primary editor for director Brett Ratner's films, such as Money Talks (1997), Rush Hour (1998), The Family Man (2000), Rush Hour 2 (2001), Red Dragon (2002), and After the Sunset (2004), X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) with Mark Goldblatt and Julia Wong. Helfrich directed Good Luck Chuck.

He has also edited, with Brett Ratner's direction, a version of the Bollywood film production titled Kites:The Remix a.k.a. Kites (2010), as well as the pilot episode for Prison Break, an American-based TV drama series produced by Brett Ratner. Helfrich edited Brett Ratner's music video Beautiful Stranger featuring Madonna.

Nicolas Cage

Nicolas Kim Coppola (born January 7, 1964), known professionally as Nicolas Cage, is an American actor, director and producer. During his early career, Cage starred in a variety of films such as Valley Girl (1983), Racing with the Moon (1984), Birdy (1984), Peggy Sue Got Married (1986), Raising Arizona (1987), Moonstruck (1987), Vampire's Kiss (1989), Wild at Heart (1990), Fire Birds (1990), Honeymoon in Vegas (1992), and Red Rock West (1993).

Cage received an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, and Screen Actors Guild Award for his performance as an alcoholic Hollywood writer in Leaving Las Vegas (1995) before coming to the attention of wider audiences with mainstream films, such as The Rock (1996), Face/Off (1997), Con Air (1997) and City of Angels (1998). He earned his second Academy Award nomination for his performance as Charlie and Donald Kaufman in Adaptation (2002). He also directed the film Sonny (2002), for which he was nominated for Grand Special Prize at Deauville Film Festival. Cage owns the production company Saturn Films and has produced films such as Shadow of the Vampire (2000) and The Life of David Gale (2003).

He has also appeared in National Treasure (2004), Lord of War (2005), Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009), and Kick-Ass (2010). Films such as Ghost Rider (2007) and Knowing (2009) were box office successes. In the 2010s, he has starred in The Croods (2013), Joe (2014), Mom and Dad (2018), Mandy (2018), Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018) and Love, Antosha (2019).

Nicolas Cage filmography

The filmography of American actor, director and producer, Nicolas Cage includes the year the film was or will be released, the name of his character, the director, and other related notes. There is also a list of films he has produced and his appearances in television. Cage has appeared in over 90 films throughout his career.

Scott Weinger

Scott Weinger (born October 5, 1975) is an American actor, voice actor, writer and producer, best known as the voice of the title character in Disney's Aladdin. Weinger reprised the role in the two direct-to-video sequels, the television series of the same name, and the Kingdom Hearts and Disney Infinity video game series. He is also known for playing Steve Hale on the ABC sitcom Full House and its Netflix sequel Fuller House. He is also a writer and producer for television, including for ABC's Galavant and Black-ish. He was a co-executive producer of ABC's The Muppets.

Step by Step (TV series)

Step by Step is an American television sitcom that aired for seven seasons. It ran on ABC as part of its TGIF Friday night lineup from September 20, 1991 to August 15, 1997, then moved to CBS, where it aired from September 19, 1997 to June 26, 1998. Patrick Duffy and Suzanne Somers star as single parents, each with three children, who spontaneously marry during a Jamaican vacation after developing a budding relationship while Frank is Carole’s client, resulting in their becoming the heads of a large blended family.

The Cares of a Family Man

"The Cares of a Family Man" (German: "Die Sorge des Hausvaters") is a short story by Franz Kafka, originally written in German, between 1914 and 1917 about a creature called Odradek.

The creature has drawn the attention of many philosophers and literary critics, who have all attempted to interpret its meaning; thus, there are numerous analyses of the text.

In 1919, the story appeared in Ein Landarzt. Kleine Erzählungen (A Country Doctor), a collection of Kafka's short stories published by Kurt Wolff (Munich and Leipzig).

The Family Man (U.S. TV series)

The Family Man is an American sitcom which aired on CBS from September 11, 1990, to July 17, 1991. The series, starring Gregory Harrison, was created by William Bickley and Michael Warren, who also served as executive producers with Thomas L. Miller and Robert L. Boyett. Martha Williamson served as supervising producer, with Ross Brown as co-executive producer. In addition to being produced by Lorimar Television and Miller-Boyett Productions, the show was also under the Catalina Television marque (Harrison's production company).

Lasting for 22 episodes, The Family Man originally aired on Saturday nights at 8 p.m. alongside the established Miller-Boyett series The Hogan Family, which had moved to CBS from NBC.

Téa Leoni

Elizabeth Téa Pantaleoni (; born February 25, 1966), better known by her stage name Téa Leoni, is an American actress and producer.

In her early career, she starred in the television sitcoms Flying Blind (1992–93) and The Naked Truth (1995–98). Her breakthrough role was in the 1995 action comedy film Bad Boys. In later years, Leoni had the female lead roles in films including Deep Impact (1998), The Family Man (2000), Jurassic Park III (2001), Spanglish (2004) and Fun with Dick and Jane (2005). In 2014, she returned to television in the leading role in the CBS political drama series Madam Secretary.

Films directed by Brett Ratner

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