The Eruption of Mount St. Helens!

The Eruption of Mount St. Helens! is a 1980 American short documentary film directed by George Casey. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short. It was released on DVD by Graphic Films Corporation.[1]

The Eruption of Mount St. Helens!
The Eruption of Mount St. Helens! FilmPoster.jpeg
DVD cover
Directed byGeorge Casey
Produced byGeorge Casey
Ammiel G. Najar
Paul Novros
Written byGeorge Casey
Narrated byRobert Foxworth
CinematographyJames Neihouse
Release date
  • 1980
Running time
25 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

See also

References

  1. ^ "NY Times: The Eruption of Mount St. Helens!". NY Times. Retrieved December 1, 2008.

External links

47th Air Division

The 47th Air Division is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with Strategic Air Command at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. It was inactivated on 27 February 1987.

The unit's origins begin with its predecessor, the World War II 47th Bombardment Wing was part of Fifteenth Air Force. Although earmarked for Eighth Air Force, it served instead with the Twelfth, and later, Fifteenth Air Forces, first as a fighter wing, then as a medium bomb wing, and finally as a heavy bomb wing. In the 1942 early 1943 period many of its assigned components did not actually operate under wing control, while other components were temporarily attached. Its components supported the bombing of Pantelleria Island and the invasions of Sicily, Italy, and southern France in 1943–1944. Wing aircraft also flew missions to the Balkans, Austria, France, and Germany, with the Rumanian oil fields as primary targets from April–August 1944. The final mission on 25 April 1945 struck marshalling yards at Linz, Austria. It returned to the United States in May 1945 to prepare for bombardment operations in the Pacific as a very heavy bombardment wing. On 7 September 1945, the wing became a paper unit and in mid Oct inactivated at Sioux City, Iowa.

Reactivated an intermediate command echelon of Strategic Air Command in June 1952, the 47th Air Division served as an intermediate echelon between Strategic Air Command's Eighth Air Force and operational units in the field. From April 1955 to March 1970, it filled the same role for the Fifteenth Air Force and from March 1970 to July 1971, for the Second Air Force. In July 1971 the 47th returned to Fifteenth Air Force control where it continued to supervise subordinate unit training and other activities.

The eruption of Mount St Helens in the state of Washington in May 1980 seriously affected division operations. Aircraft were dispersed to various bases while around the clock shifts removed the volcanic ash. The division as inactivated in February 1987 as a result of budget restraints.

Cascades Volcano Observatory

The David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) is a volcano observatory that monitors volcanoes in the northern Cascade Range. It was established in the summer of 1980, after the eruption of Mount St. Helens. The observatory is named for United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcanologist David A. Johnston, who was swept away in the Mount St. Helens eruption on the morning of May 18, 1980. The observatory's current territory covers Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. The Cascade Range's extent includes northern California, and Cascade volcanoes in that state, such as Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak, previously fell under the CVO's jurisdiction. However, these volcanoes now fall under the jurisdiction of the California Volcano Observatory (CalVO), formed in February 2012 and based in Menlo Park, California, which monitors and researches volcanic activity throughout California and Nevada.The Cascades Volcano Observatory is part of the USGS, a scientific agency of the United States government. It is located in Vancouver, Washington in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area.

Cougar, Washington

Cougar is an unincorporated community and former town in Cowlitz County, Washington, northeast of the city of Woodland. Cougar is located 29 miles (47 km) northeast of Woodland along Washington State Route 503 and situated along the northwest bank of Yale Lake, a reservoir on the Lewis River. The population was 122 at the 1990 Census, when it was still incorporated as a town, but disincorporated before the 2000 Census. The Cougar community is part of the Woodland School District, a K-12 school district of about 2,200 students. Cougar is the nearest community to Mount St. Helens, which lies 13 miles (20.9215 km) to its northeast. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

A post office called Cougar was established in 1902. The community was named after the cougar.

Explosive eruption

In volcanology, an explosive eruption is a volcanic eruption of the most violent type. A notable example is the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Such eruptions result when sufficient gas has dissolved under pressure within a viscous magma such that expelled lava violently froths into volcanic ash when pressure is suddenly lowered at the vent. Sometimes a lava plug will block the conduit to the summit, and when this occurs, eruptions are more violent. Explosive eruptions can send rocks, dust, gas and pyroclastic material up to 20 km into the atmosphere at a rate of up to 100,000 tonnes per second, traveling at several hundred meters per second. This cloud may then collapse, creating a pyroclastic flow of hot volcanic matter.

Harrington Place, Washington

Harrington Place, also known as Herrington Place, is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington. Harrington Place is located east of the city of Castle Rock and along the South Fork Toutle River. Harrington Place is accessed by about 19 miles (31 km) of logging roads off of Washington State Route 504, also known as the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway, after reaching the community of Toutle while traveling eastbound. The Harrington Place community is part of the Kelso School District, a K-12 school district of nearly 5,000 students.

Harrington Place is located 27.5 miles (44.3 km) northwest of Mount St. Helens. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

Harry Truman (disambiguation)

Harry S. Truman (1884–1972) was the 33rd President of the United States.

Presidency of Harry S. Truman, his presidencyHarry Truman may also refer to:

Harry R. Truman (1896–1980), victim of the eruption of Mount St. Helens

USS Harry S. Truman, a Nimitz-class super-carrier of the United States Navyin entertainment:

Harry S. Truman, a fictional character in the television show Twin Peaks

"Harry Truman" (song), a 1975 song on the Chicago album Chicago VIII

"Harry Truman", a song about the Mount St. Helens volcano victim by the Irish band Headgear

"Harry Truman", a song by Mindless Self Indulgence off their album Frankenstein Girls Will Seem Strangely Sexy

Helenite

Helenite, also known as Mount St. Helens obsidian, emerald obsidianite, and ruby obsidianite, is an artificial glass made from the fused volcanic rock dust from Mount St. Helens and marketed as a gemstone. Helenite was first created accidentally after the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. Workers from the Weyerhaeuser Timber Company were attempting to salvage equipment damaged after the volcanic eruption. Using acetylene torches, they noticed that the intense heat was melting the nearby volcanic ash and rock and turning it a greenish color. The silica, aluminium, iron, and trace amounts of chromium and copper present in the rocks and ash in the area, combined with the heat of the torches, transformed the volcanic particles into a compound that would be later commercially replicated as helenite.

As word of the discovery spread, jewelry companies took note and began to find ways to reproduce the helenite. Helenite is made by heating rock dust and particles from the Mount St. Helens area in a furnace to a temperature of approximately 2,700 °F (1,480 °C). Although helenite and obsidian are both forms of glass, helenite differs from obsidian in that it is man-made. The stone has been marketed by the jewelry industry because of its emerald-like color, good refractive index, and durability. It is seen as an inexpensive alternative to naturally occurring green gemstones like emerald and peridot. Helenite can also come in various red, green and blue varieties.

James Neihouse

James Lawson Neihouse (born April 3, 1955) is an American cinematographer who has been involved with many of the most memorable and successful IMAX 2D and IMAX 3D films to date.

Kathi Goertzen

Kathi Goertzen (April 30, 1958 – August 13, 2012) was a longtime co-news anchor of Seattle ABC affiliate KOMO-TV along with Dan Lewis (the 6PM edition) and also the 5PM edition with Eric Johnson. She joined KOMO in June 1980, after the eruption of Mount St. Helens and did many special newscasts thereafter, including the fall of the Berlin Wall (she was the first local American TV news reporter to do so).

Kid Valley, Washington

Kid Valley is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington. Kid Valley is located east of the city of Castle Rock and along the North Fork Toutle River. Kid Valley is reached by traveling 17.8 miles (28.6 km) east of Castle Rock along Washington State Route 504, which is also known as the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway. The Kid Valley community is part of the Toutle Lake School District, a K-12 school district of about 600 students.

Kid Valley is located 23.86 miles (38.40 km) northwest of Mount St. Helens. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

Pigeon Springs, Washington

Pigeon Springs is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington. Pigeon Springs is located east of the city of Kalama and along the Kalama River. Pigeon Springs is reached by traveling 16.8 miles (27.0 km) east on Kalama River Road from exit 32 of Interstate 5. The Pigeon Springs community is part of the Kalama School District, a K-12 school district of about 900 students.

Pigeon Springs is located 22.7 miles (36.5 km) southwest of Mount St. Helens. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States and it even reached the Cowlitz river and pigeon springs.

Richard Perkins (scientist)

Richard W. Perkins is a former scientist at the Hanford Site and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at Richland, Washington State. His research included study of nuclear reactors and their effect on their environment, study of the ash from the eruption of Mount St. Helens, and Operation "Star Wars." He also worked with the first moon rocks. Although too young to join, he joined the U.S navy to fight in WW2.

He learned to use SONAR as part of his training in the navy.

He is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Richard Perkins died December 29, 2016 at home at the age of 90.

Saint Helens, Washington

Saint Helens is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington. Saint Helens is located east of the city of Castle Rock and along the North Fork Toutle River. Saint Helens is reached by traveling 24 miles (39 km) east of Castle Rock along Washington State Route 504, which is also known as the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway. The Saint Helens community takes its name from Mount St. Helens, which, in turn, was named by explorer George Vancouver after a friend of his, Baron St. Helens. The Saint Helens community is part of the Toutle Lake School District, a K-12 school district of about 600 students.

Saint Helens is located 19.15 miles (30.82 km) northwest of Mount St. Helens. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

Sightly, Washington

Sightly is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington. Sightly is located east of the city of Castle Rock and east of Silver Lake. Sightly is reached by taking exit 49 off of Interstate 5, traveling 10.4 miles (16.7 km) east along Washington State Route 504, which is also known as the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway, and then traveling 2.4 miles (3.9 km) along Sightly Road. The Sightly community was given its name due to its views of Mount St. Helens. The Sightly community is part of the Toutle Lake School District, a K-12 school district of about 600 students.

Sightly is located 25.7 miles (41.4 km) northwest of Mount St. Helens. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

Silver Lake, Washington

Silver Lake, sometimes Silverlake, is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington, in the southwestern portion of the state. Silver Lake is located 6 miles (9.7 km) east of Castle Rock along Washington State Route 504, which is also known as the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway. The area considered Silverlake is about 6 miles (10 km) east of Interstate 5 (I-5) and is approximately 50 miles (80 km) from Portland, Oregon, to the south and Seattle about 110 miles (180 km) to the north. The closest cities to the subject property are Castle Rock, six miles (10 km) to the west, and Toutle, four miles (6 km) east.

The Silver Lake community takes its name from the lake of the same name, which it lies on the northwest shore of. The Silver Lake community is part of the Toutle Lake School District, a K-12 school district of about 600 students. Silver Lake is about 30 miles (48 km) west of Mount St. Helens and near the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, which lies at the end of the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States. The WDFW has planted Grass Carp in this lake, however it is illegal to fish for or retain grass carp.Silverlake also describes the associated marsh. It is home to a nature trail, and the visitor center for the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.

Toutle, Washington

Toutle is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington. Toutle is located 10 miles (16 km) east of Castle Rock along Washington State Route 504, which is also known as the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway. The Toutle community, similar to Toutle River, takes its name from the Hullooetell, a band of the Skillot - a Chinookan tribe. The Toutle community is part of the Toutle Lake School District, a K-12 school district of about 720 students. Toutle is near Mount St. Helens and the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, which lies at the end of the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

Toutle is a rural community at the foot of Mt. St. Helens.

Washington state tartan

Washington state tartan is the official state tartan established by the Washington state legislature.Consisting of a green background with stripes of blue, white, yellow, red, and black, the state tartan of Washington was designed by Margaret McLeod van Nus and Frank Cannonito in 1988 to commemorate the Washington centennial celebration. It was registered with the Scottish Tartans Society after its adoption by the state legislature in 1991. The colors represent various aspects of nature: green symbolizes rich forests of the state; blue the lakes, rivers and ocean; white the snow-capped mountains; red the apple and cherry crops; yellow the wheat and grain crops; and black the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Woodland Park, Washington

Woodland Park is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington. The Woodland Park community is located 17 miles (27 km) northeast of Woodland along Washington State Route 503 and on the north shore of Lake Merwin, a reservoir on the Lewis River. The Woodland Park community is part of the Woodland School District, a K-12 school district of about 2,200 students.

Woodland Park is located 19.3 miles (31.1 km) southwest of Mount St. Helens. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

Yale, Washington

Yale is an unincorporated community in Cowlitz County, Washington, northeast of the city of Woodland. Yale is located 22.4 miles (36.0 km) northeast of Woodland along Washington State Route 503 and situated between Yale Lake and Lake Merwin, both reservoirs on the Lewis River. The rock-fill hydro-electric Yale Dam is nearby. Named for Yale University, the only school teaching forestry in the 19th century, the Yale community is part of the Woodland School District, a K-12 school district of about 2,200 students.

Yale is second nearest community, after Cougar, to Mount St. Helens, which lies 16.2 miles (26.1 km) to its northeast. The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States. For many years climbers attempting to scale Mount St. Helens registered at Jack's Store until it burned down in December 2007. Yale has several view locations for Mount Saint Helens.

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