The Edinburgh Gazette

The Edinburgh Gazette, along with The London Gazette and The Belfast Gazette, is an official newspaper of the United Kingdom government. The Stationery Office (TSO) is published on behalf of Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO) in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Publication of The Edinburgh Gazette began in 1699 by James Watson[1] (34 years after the first edition of The London Gazette). It ran for 41 issues, the last being on 17 July 1699, after which the link between the editor, Captain Donaldson, and the printer was broken.[2] It reappeared sporadically, but did not begin an unbroken and continuous publication run until 1793.

It is published on Tuesdays and Fridays, and it includes official notices relating to matters of state, Parliament, planning, transport, and public finance, as well as insolvency and bankruptcy notices. It also contains advertisements. For example, local authorities place notices in the Gazette about matters of local interest, such as road closures.

The Crown Agent is, ex officio, the Keeper of the Edinburgh Gazette.

References

  1. ^ Dictionary of National Biography:James Watson (d.1722)
  2. ^ Scottish Historical Review: April 1910

External links

1922 in Scotland

Events from the year 1922 in Scotland.

Court of the Lord Lyon

The Court of the Lord Lyon (the Lyon Court) is a standing court of law which regulates heraldry in Scotland. The Lyon Court maintains the register of grants of arms, known as the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland, as well as records of genealogies.

The Lyon Court is a public body, and the fees for grants of arms are paid to HM Treasury. It is headed by the Lord Lyon King of Arms, who must be legally qualified, as he has criminal jurisdiction in heraldic matters, and the court is fully integrated into the Scottish legal system, including having a dedicated prosecutor, known in Scotland as a procurator fiscal.

Its equivalent in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, in terms of awarding arms is the College of Arms, which is a royal corporation and not a court of law. The High Court of Chivalry is a civil court in England and Wales with jurisdiction over cases dealing with heraldry.

Ecclesiastical Household

The Ecclesiastical Household is a part of the Royal Household of the sovereign of the United Kingdom. Reflecting the different constitutions of the churches of England and Scotland, there are separate households in each nation.

Falkland Pursuivant

Falkland Pursuivant of Arms is a Scottish pursuivant of arms of the Court of the Lord Lyon.The title was first mentioned in 1493 and it is derived from the Royal Palace of the same name located in Fife. The title is often used for a Pursuivant Extraordinary: an officer who is not part of the ordinary complement of the Court but is called to duty when needed.

The badge of office is A stag lodged requardant Gules, gorged of a coronet of four fleur-de-lys (two visible) and four crosses pattee (one and two halves visible) Or.On 1 May 2018 the Lord Lyon appointed Roderick Macpherson to the role as an extraordinary Officer of Arms.

Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod

The Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod is the Gentleman Usher to the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, established in 1687.

List of historic Senators of the College of Justice

A list of the Senators of the College of Justice in Scotland from its establishment in 1532 to the present day.

Lord Advocate

Her Majesty's Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Scottish Gaelic: Morair Tagraidh, Scots: Laird Advocat), is the chief legal officer of the Scottish Government and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. He or she is the chief public prosecutor for Scotland and all prosecutions on indictment are conducted by the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service, nominally in the Lord Advocate's name.

The officeholder is one of the Great Officers of State of Scotland. The current Lord Advocate is The Rt Hon. James Wolffe, QC.

Lord Justice Clerk

The Lord Justice Clerk is the second most senior judge in Scotland, after the Lord President of the Court of Session.

Originally clericus justiciarie or Clerk to the Court of Justiciary, the counterpart in the criminal courts of the Lord Clerk Register, the status of the office increased over time and the Justice-Clerk came to claim a seat on the Bench by practice and custom. This was recognised by the Privy Council of Scotland in 1663 and the Lord Justice Clerk became the effective head of the reformed High Court of Justiciary in 1672 when the court was reconstituted. The Lord Justice Clerk now rarely presides at criminal trials in the High Court, with most of his or her time being spent dealing with civil and criminal appeals.

The Lord Justice Clerk has the title in both the Court of Session and the High Court of Justiciary and, as President of the Second Division of the Inner House, is in charge of the Second Division of Judges of the Inner House of the Court of Session. The office is one of the Great Officers of State of Scotland.

The current Lord Justice Clerk is Leeona Dorrian, Lady Dorrian, who was appointed to the position on 13 April 2016.

Lord Lieutenant of Banffshire

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Banffshire, Scotland.

James Duff, 2nd Earl Fife 17 March 1794 – 24 January 1809

In commission 1809–1813 Sir George Abercromby, 4th Baronet

Francis Garden Campbell

Stewart Souler

James Duff, 4th Earl Fife 8 June 1813 – 1856

James Duff, 5th Earl Fife 17 March 1856 – 7 August 1879

Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox, 6th Duke of Richmond 22 August 1879 – 27 September 1903

Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox, 7th Duke of Richmond 16 November 1903 – 18 January 1928

Sir John Ritchie Findlay, 1st Baronet 11 April 1928 – 13 April 1930

James Archibald 19 July 1930 – 8 September 1946

Sir George Abercromby, 8th Baronet 21 December 1946 – 9 September 1964

Col. Thomas Robert Gordon-Duff 15 January 1965 – 1987 †

James Alexander Strachan McPherson 11 December 1987 – 2002 †

Clare Nancy Russell 19 February 2003 – present † Known as Lord-Lieutenant of the County of Banff in Grampian Region 1975–1996.

Marchmont Herald

Marchmont Herald of Arms is a current Scottish herald of arms of the Court of the Lord Lyon (there are six herald titles but only three heralds at any one time)

The office was first mentioned in 1438, and the title is derived from the royal castle of Marchmont, an older name for Roxburgh Castle in the Scottish Borders.The badge of office is A tower of three castellations Vert masoned Argent, the dexter castellation Azure charged of a saltire Argent the sinister castellation Argent charged of a cross Gules, all ensigned of the Crown of Scotland Proper..The office is currently held by The Hon. Adam Bruce, WS. He was appointed to this post on 2 April 2012.

New towns in the United Kingdom

The new towns in the United Kingdom were planned under the powers of the New Towns Act 1946 and later acts to relocate populations in poor or bombed-out housing following the Second World War. They were developed in three waves. Later developments included the expanded towns: existing towns which were substantially expanded to accommodate what was called the "overspill" population from densely populated areas of deprivation.

Designated new towns were removed from local authority control and placed under the supervision of a development corporation. These corporations were later disbanded and their assets split between local authorities and, in England, the Commission for New Towns (later English Partnerships).

Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer

The Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer is an officer in Scotland who represents the Crown's interests in bona vacantia, ultimus haeres and treasure trove.

The Q<R holds two offices, both instituted at the foundation of the Court of Exchequer in 1707 and which were joined in 1836. The Queen's Remembrancer was the chief executive officer of the Exchequer under the Barons of Exchequer. The Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's principal duty was the examination and audit of the criminal accounts for Scotland. In more recent history, this officer was the Treasury representative on various Scottish government boards and acted as Paymaster-General in Scotland.

From 1835, the King's Rembrancer carried out the duties of the King's Almoner (which office had been suppressed in 1832), including the payment of annuities to those on the royal charity roll.From 1858 the office of Q<R was held in conjunction with that of Registrar of Companies, Limited Partnerships and Business Names, auditor of the accounts of sheriff clerks and procurators fiscal, responsible for the collection of fines and penalties imposed in Scottish courts, Keeper of the Edinburgh Gazette, administrator of treasure trove and of estates of deceased persons which fall to the Crown as ultimus haeres, and responsible for the custody of the Regalia of Scotland kept in Edinburgh Castle.

In 1981 the office was transferred to the Crown Agent, the senior officer of the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service. Since 1999 that office has been part of the Scottish Government, and the link with the Treasury and company registration has been severed.

Sheriff of Ayr

The Sheriff of Ayr was historically (from 1221) the royal official responsible for enforcing law and order in Ayr, Scotland and bringing criminals to justice. Sundrum Castle was used by the sheriff from the 14th century, and Loudoun Castle from the 16th century. Prior to 1748 most sheriffdoms were held on a hereditary basis. From that date, following the Jacobite uprising of 1745, the hereditary sheriffs were replaced by salaried sheriff-deputes, qualified advocates who were members of the Scottish Bar.

In 1946 Bute was added to form the new sheriffdom of Ayr and Bute, which was in turn abolished in 1975 and replaced by the current sheriffdom of South Strathclyde, Dumfries and Galloway .

Sheriff of Caithness

The Sheriff of Caithness was historically the royal official responsible for enforcing law and order in Caithness, Scotland.

The sheriffdom of Caithness appears to have been created in the mid 12th century and to have been dissolved and incorporated into the sheriffdom of Inverness in the 13th century. in 1455, William Sinclair, Earl of Caithness gained a grant of the justiciary and sheriffdom of the area from the Sheriff of Inverness. Prior to 1748 most sheriffdoms were held on a hereditary basis. From that date, following the Jacobite uprising of 1745, the hereditary sheriffs were replaced by salaried sheriff-deputes, qualified advocates who were members of the Scottish Bar.

In 1747, the office became known as the Sheriff of Caithness & Sutherland, however the sheriffdoms were disunited in 1806 again being known as the Sheriff of Caithness. It became the Sheriff of Sutherland & Caithness in 1857. In 1870 the office became known as the Sheriff of Caithness, Orkney & Shetland. It was again reorganised as the Sheriff of Caithness, Sutherland, Orkney & Zetland in 1946, but was abolished in 1975 when the current sheriffdom of Grampian, Highland and Islands was created.

Sheriff of Fife and Kinross

The Sheriff of Fife was historically the office responsible for enforcing law and order in Fife, Scotland and bringing criminals to justice.

Prior to 1748 most sheriffdoms were held on a hereditary basis. From that date, following the Jacobite uprising of 1745, they were replaced by salaried sheriff-deputes, qualified advocates who were members of the Scottish Bar.

Following a merger of the sheriffdoms, the office became the Sheriff of Fife and Kinross in 1881.In 1975 the sheriffdom was largely merged into the new sheriffdom of Tayside, Central and Fife.

Solicitor General for Scotland

Her Majesty's Solicitor General for Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Àrd-neach-lagha a' Chrùin an Alba) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Scottish Government on Scots Law. They are also responsible for the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service which together constitute the Criminal Prosecution Service in Scotland.

Until 1999, when the Scottish Parliament and Scottish Executive were created, the Lord Advocate and the Solicitor General for Scotland advised Her Majesty's Government. Since their transfer to the Scottish Government, the British Government has been advised on Scots Law by the Advocate General for Scotland.

The Belfast Gazette

The Belfast Gazette, along with The London Gazette and The Edinburgh Gazette, is an official newspaper of the United Kingdom government. It is published by The Stationery Office (TSO), on behalf of Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO) in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The Belfast Gazette was first published on 7 June 1921. Previously the same function was performed for the whole of Ireland by The Dublin Gazette, but with the partition of Ireland, a separate publication was required in Northern Ireland. The Dublin Gazette now continues in the Republic of Ireland as Iris Oifigiúil.The Belfast Gazette is now published once a week, on Fridays, and it includes official notices relating to matters of state, Parliament, the Northern Ireland Executive, the Northern Ireland Assembly, planning, transport, and public finance, as well as insolvency and bankruptcy notices.

The London Gazette

The London Gazette is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford Gazette. This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury (1712) and Berrow's Worcester Journal (1690), because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage. It does not have a large circulation.

Other official newspapers of the UK government are The Edinburgh Gazette and The Belfast Gazette, which, apart from reproducing certain materials of nationwide interest published in The London Gazette, also contain publications specific to Scotland and Northern Ireland, respectively.

In turn, The London Gazette carries not only notices of UK-wide interest, but also those relating specifically to entities or people in England and Wales. However, certain notices that are only of specific interest to Scotland or Northern Ireland are also required to be published in The London Gazette.

The London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes are published by TSO (The Stationery Office) on behalf of Her Majesty's Stationery Office. They are subject to Crown copyright.

Unicorn Pursuivant

Unicorn Pursuivant of Arms in Ordinary is a current Scottish pursuivant of arms in Ordinary of the Court of the Lord Lyon.The title was created after 1381, and derived from the unicorn. One of these beasts is used as a supporter for the royal arms of Scotland, and as a royal badge.

The badge of office is A unicorn couchant Argent, horded, unguled, maned and tufted Or gorged of a coronet of four fleurs-de-lys (two visible) and four crosses pattee (one and two halves visible) Or.The office is currently held by Liam Devlin, Esq. He was appointed to this post on 6 January 2016.

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